TPOD Archive 2022

← 2021 TPODs

Daughter of Heaven

Daughter of Heaven

Original Post May 16, 2012 Recent analyses suggest that Saturn's moon Phoebe resembles a planet. Saturn's moon Phoebe is comparatively small, roughly 220 kilometers in diameter. Its surface gravity is 0.224m/s^2, compared to the 9m/s^2 on Earth. Phoebe is also as black as night, making it one of the darkest ...
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Globular star cluster Messier 55

Old Theories about Young Stars

Original Post May 11, 2012 Spherical stars in spherical arrangements From the ESO: “A new image of Messier 55 from ESO's VISTA infrared survey telescope shows tens of thousands of stars crowded together like a swarm of bees.... One hundred thousand stars are packed within a sphere with a diameter ...
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Oarkziz crater, Algeria

Crater Analysis

Original Post May 9, 2012 Is this Algerian crater the result of an asteroid impact? Previous Picture of the Day articles have taken up the question of cratering on planets and moons. In the larger sense, that of the Solar System as a whole, it has been argued that craters ...
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Uranus with a few of its moons

Sturm und Drang

Original Post May 7, 2012 Uranus recently erupted with a new bright region in its lower latitudes. Could electrical effects be responsible? The planet Uranus revolves around the Sun at a mean orbital radius of 2,870,990,000 kilometers, 19 times as far as the Earth. Of course, its most exotic attribute ...
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Les Panaches De La Lune

Les Panaches De La Lune

Original Post May 4, 2012 Enceladus continues to provide evidence supporting Electric Universe theories. On March 2, 2012 the Cassini-Solstice spacecraft flew by Saturn's moon Enceladus at a distance of 74 kilometers, the closest it will come for the next three years. Cassini again passed over the "superheated geysers" erupting ...
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Two for One

Two for One

Original Post April 27, 2012 The Sombrero galaxy appears to be a giant elliptical galaxy with an embedded disk. One of the most significant contributions to plasma cosmology comes from Dr. Anthony L. Peratt, a plasma physicist and protégé of the Nobel laureate Hannes Alfvén. Peratt studied plasma formations in ...
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Part of the IceCube neutrino observatory in Antarctica

Cosmic Ions

Original Post April 25, 2012 New studies suggest that the origin of the strongest cosmic rays is still mysterious. Cosmic rays are energetic ions from space that arrive in the Sun's local neighborhood traveling at extremely high velocities. About 90% of all cosmic rays are single protons, or hydrogen nuclei, ...
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The Missing Matter is Missing

The Missing Matter is Missing

Original Post April 23, 2012 The missing matter that has to be there to account for the “fast” rotation of the Milky Way’s arms is missing. Recent measurements of the velocities of stars within 13,000 light-years of the Sun have allowed astronomers to calculate the total mass of the matter ...
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Composite x-ray and infrared image of a nearby purported supernova remnant

Made You Blink

Original Post April 19, 2012 The problem with astronomy is not that the stars are so far away or that modern instruments are expensive. The problem with astronomy is the human tendency to blink when something unexpected comes at you quickly. For three centuries, Newton was God, Gravity was King, ...
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Artist’s impression of imagined fog

The Fog Clears

Original Post April 16, 2012 Redshift measurements of five galaxies verify what astronomers have always believed—if their beliefs are true. The nice thing about math is that it provides results that are absolutely true. Unless you’ve made errors in your addition, you can be sure that your conclusions are without ...
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A Ring of Truth

A Ring of Truth

Original Post April 13, 2012 Rings around stars confirm Electric Universe theory. A recent press release from the European Space Agency announces that a ring around the star Fomalhaut (Fo-mal-HOUT) demonstrates “the glow from dust in the debris disc - a structure resembling the Kuiper Belt in the primordial Solar ...
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The Orion Nebula

Electric “Creation”

Original Post April 9, 2012 Million-degree plasma in the Orion Nebula comes not from the kinetic excitation of cold gas, but from the electric currents of space. For many years astrophysical theories of stellar and galactic development have been relegated to the processes of mechanical action. Everything we see and ...
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The Moon's north pole

The Moon, Yes, That Will Be My Home

Original Post April 5, 2012 Lunar colonization awaits a benefit that exceeds the cost. A recent Picture of the Day article discussed the new GRAIL mission to the Moon. Two satellites will orbit the Moon together, with a range-finding system that will detect gravity variations on the lunar surface. On ...
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Predicting Volcanic Eruptions by Isohypse Reconnection

Predicting Volcanic Eruptions by Isohypse Reconnection

Original Post April 1, 2012 Recent research in volcanology has concentrated on improving the predictability of major eruption events with the primary aim of providing sufficient warning to enable evacuation of personnel from the danger zone. A breakthrough in understanding the underlying mechanism of eruption events has recently emerged from ...
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Saturn's twin aurorae

Saturn’s Auroral Ovals

Original Post March 30, 2012 Astrophysicists are beginning to acknowledge the role that electricity plays in space. The Cassini-Huygens mission (now called Cassini-Equinox) was launched from Cape Canaveral on October 15, 1997. Its primary mission is the exploration of the Saturnian system, including Saturn's atmosphere, its rings, its magnetosphere and ...
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Gravity anomalies on the Moon

Lunar Grail

Original Post March 26, 2012 A new mission to map the gravity field of the Moon. On September 10, 2011 NASA launched the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) satellites on a mission to the Moon. GRAIL-A and GRAIL-B are nearly identical spacecraft, except that B is designed to follow ...
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Mercury's north pole

Mercury’s Catastrophic Birth

Original Post March 23, 2012 Mercury reveals the violence of planetary genesis. Mercury's story is probably a complicated tale of extremes. The planet's surface is heavily scarred, with steep-walled canyons, scarps that rise up several kilometers, and craters that penetrate the crust for several kilometers below the mean elevation. The ...
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Vesta

Goddess of the Hearth

Original Post March 20, 2012 Vesta is confirming Electric Universe ideas about planetary scarring. Vesta appears to have experienced some powerful forces. Several craters more than 50 kilometers in diameter mar its surface. Near Vesta's south pole is a particularly large example that is 460 kilometers wide. Since Vesta has ...
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Dark against light solar spicules in the H-alpha band

The Dark of the Sun

Original Post March 15, 2012 Dark mode plasma phenomena exist on the Sun. The image at the top of the page is the most detailed ever taken of the Sun's chromosphere. The smallest features are 130 kilometers in size. Each spicule is about 480 kilometers in diameter, with a length ...
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Firdousi, a rampart crater (center) on Mercury

The Electrical Etching of Mercury

Original Post March 8, 2012 The MESSENGER space probe is confirming the Electric Universe theory. MESSENGER entered orbit around Mercury on March 17, 2011 after traveling nearly eight billion kilometers. Since that time, it has sent hundreds of close-up images of the surface, revealing features and topography that assure Mercury's ...
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The Raymondi (1200-200 BCE).

The Very Stones Cry Out

Original Post March 7, 2012 Even the lonely monuments left behind have a story to tell. Chavín de Huantar, in the Peruvian Andes, is one of many civilisations to have preceded the mighty Inca empire. The occupants of the ruins have no name; lacking a script, their cultural identity is ...
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Orion Nebula

My Friend Flicker

Original Post March 2, 2012 What causes the rapid changes observed in Orion Nebula "protostars"? Using a combination of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the ESA Herschel Space Observatory, astronomers found that so-called "young stars" are changing in brightness much faster than they thought possible. Instead of taking several years ...
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The Columbia River Basin

From the Canadian Northwest to the Ocean so Blue

Original Post February 29, 2012 The Columbia River is a life-giving artery to the Pacific Northwest. Is it a recent addition to American geography? Many Picture of the Day articles discuss cosmic electrical forces that sculpted the face of the Earth in the recent past. The result of that interaction ...
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The Grand Canyon

The Case of the Missing Delta

Original Post February 24, 2012 Where is the material that used to fill the Grand Canyon? In previous Picture of the Day articles, it was suggested that features on other planets and moons should be used to help explain what is found on Earth, rather than vice versa. Since the ...
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A portion of the Rimae Burg graben on the Moon

Lunar Graben

Original Post February 22, 2012 Did tectonic and volcanic forces create the wide, parallel trenches on the Moon? The Moon has seen cataclysmic devastation at some time in its past. There are giant craters, wide and deep valleys, and multi-kilometer long rilles crisscrossing its surface. Conventional theories postulate that the ...
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← 2021 TPODs

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