TPOD Archive 2020

← 2019 TPODs

Muddy Mars

Muddy Mars

Cracks in this 1.2 meter Martian rock are thought to be from drying mud more than 3 billion years ago. Credit: Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on the arm of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover. January 22, 2020 NASA officials recently announced that there is water on Mars. Again. That ...
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Obscure Visualization

Obscure Visualization

This artist’s concept depicts a hypothetical form of dark energy called quintessence. Credit: Science Photo Library. January 20, 2020 Dark energy does not exist. In 1997, two astronomers were studying Type 1a supernovae, when they found that there was “something wrong” with their data. They were shocked to discover that ...
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Stellar Mass

Stellar Mass

A neutron star is said to energize the Crab Nebula. Credit: NASA/ESA. January 17, 2020 High-velocity particles in orbit around some stars seem to indicate relativistic effects. Part of what physicists are trying to understand is the observation of spectral lines from "hot iron atoms" that appear to orbit close-in ...
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Moving Charges

Moving Charges

Electric Charge. Stock image. January 16, 2020 Astronomers see magnetism but not electricity. Scientists working with dynamos (an abbreviation of the nineteenth century term, electric-dynamo) think they found clues to how stars and galaxies acquire their magnetism. Turbulence in plasmas forms small magnetic fields, but scientists struggle to understand how ...
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Ionization

Ionization

Segment of the THOR survey near the Sagittarius arm of the Milky Way. The crosses indicate the position of polarized radio emissions. Sizes correspond to the magnitude of a Faraday rotation effect. Strong radio sources indicate the position of the spiral arm. Credit: J. Stil/University of Calgary/MPIA. January 15, 2020 ...
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Electric Furrows

Electric Furrows

Cassini's view of Dione on July 23, 2012. Credit: NASA. Click to enlarge. January 14, 2020 Images of Saturn's moon, Dione reveal trenches and cliffs. The Cassini-Huygens mission was launched from Cape Canaveral on October 15, 1997. Few now remember the public outcry against the mission. There were several attempts ...
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Stellar Vibrations

Stellar Vibrations

An illustration of vibration modes in the Sun. Credit: Kosovichev et al., "Structure and Rotation of the Solar Interior". January 13, 2020 When asking, "what are stars?", the question might seem self-evident, since they are almost always described as intensely bright, burning balls of hydrogen gas. Any particular star's size, ...
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That's No Moon!

That’s No Moon!

Mimas and Herschel crater. Credit: NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Institute. January 10, 2020 Large impact scenarios make no sense. According to Electric Universe theory, the Solar System was chaotic a few thousand years ago. The scars left on its many moons and rocky planets are forensic evidence for that idea. How ...
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Electrical Bestiary

Electrical Bestiary

The Cat's Paw nebula from the Spitzer Infrared Space Telescope in conjunction with the Galactic Legacy Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire project (GLIMPSE). Credit: NASA. January 9, 2020 Nebulae display their true natures, but convention is unable to see them. "Imagination is a beast that has to be put in a cage."--- ...
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As Above So Below

As Above So Below

Bright aurora in Utsjoki, Finnish Lapland. Credit: Rayann Elzein. January 8, 2020 What happens in space affects Earth. NASA launched the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft on August 25, 1997. From its location at LaGrange point L1, ACE analyzes the solar wind, providing real-time “space weather” reports about geomagnetic storms ...
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Not a Crater?

Not a Crater?

The walls of Wollangambie crater. January 7, 2020 The terrain found in Australia is not easy to explain using conventional theories. Many previous Picture of the Day articles discuss the continent of Australia. Wilpena Pound, Uluru, the Olgas, and the coastal topography seem to disprove gradual processes of sedimentation and ...
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Slow Down!

Slow Down!

"Dark Energy". Fractal by Stephen Smith. January 6, 2020 Is dark energy speeding everything up? Dark energy is considered a necessary adjunct to the Big Bang theory, because distant galaxies appear to be accelerating as they recede from Earth-based observatories. Recessional velocity is something that astronomers believe contributes to the ...
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Essential Knots

Essential Knots

Energetic ions stream down into the poles, exciting atmospheric molecules to the point where they emit various colors of light: red frequencies from oxygen at high altitudes, green from oxygen at lower altitudes, and blue light from nitrogen. January 3, 2020 In 1966 the U.S. Navy satellite, TRIAD, recorded "disturbances" ...
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Blue Oblivion

Blue Oblivion

NGC 3532, the "Wishing Well" star cluster. Some of the stars are blue, but others are red giants, glowing with an orange hue. Credit: ESO/G. Beccari. January 2, 2020 The Chandra X-ray Observatory recently experienced a fault that, were it not resolved, would have meant the end of its life ...
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