tpods of 2012 archive

← 2011 tpods

The Sun's changing electromagnetic field. Credit: NASA/SDO.
December 31, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 31, 2012 Problems with various theories could be resolved if mistaken identity were considered. It has been demonstrated over the centuries that the worst possible witnesses in court are often those who were present at the scene of … Continue reading
Globular cluster M4. Credit: NOAO/AURA/NSF
December 28, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 28, 2012 The light from remote globular clusters should be blue according to theory because the farther away one looks the farther back in time one sees. It seems as if each new observation from the Hubble Space … Continue reading
Color image of Rachmaninoff basin
December 27, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 27, 2012 The MESSENGER spacecraft has recently been approved for an extended mission in Mercury orbit. The Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral on August 3, 2004. On March 17, 2011 MESSENGER … Continue reading
SN1994D, a supernova in NGC 4526
December 26, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 26, 2012 NASA computer simulations are not able to correctly model supernova explosions. Contemporary astrophysical models of stellar evolution rely on the mechanical action of cold gas collapsing from gravitational impetus. Stars are seen as whirling vortices of … Continue reading
Lightning strikes the Eiffel Tower. Credit: Bertrand Kulik
December 24, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Dec 24, 2012 Glass, plastics, and various metal oxides are efficient dielectric insulators. Dry air is another example. Lightning is not well understood. The most common interpretation involves the circulation of water vapor up and down through clouds in a … Continue reading
Left: The Current Orbit of Venus as seen from the Earth in the centre. Right: What the orbit would look like with a 360-day year and a 260-day period for Venus.
December 20, 2012 by Bob Johnson
  Dec 20, 2012 Thoughts on the Origins of the Mayan Calendar The sacred Mayan calendar based on cycles of 260 days and 360 days can be traced back to the Olmecs living in 800 BCE but the cycles themselves … Continue reading
The Coma Cluster of galaxies. Credit: Sloan Digital Sky Survey
December 18, 2012 by Stephen Smith
   Dec 19, 2012 Images of the Coma Cluster from the Subaru Telescope reveal galactic filaments connecting bright “knots” of ionized gas. According to redshift calculations, the Coma Cluster is a sphere of galaxies 3.5 million light years in diameter … Continue reading
A traditional cosmology based on Icelandic mythology and a scientific cosmology
December 18, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
  Dec 18, 2012 Science and folk tradition are supposed to be strictly separate domains of knowledge, but in practice they often shade into each other. The image shown above right attempts to map the entire visible universe. The galaxies tend to … Continue reading
Archive Thumb
December 17, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 17, 2012 Is planetary science correct to use Earth as the basis for explaining other planets? “Appearances to the mind are of four kinds. Things either are what they appear to be; or they neither are, nor appear … Continue reading
Archive Thumb
December 14, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 14, 2012 Volcanoes on Mars should not be found in chains, since no crustal plate movement exists either there or on Earth. According to a recent press release, Mars experiences plate tectonics, just like Earth does. As An … Continue reading
Eta Carina in X-ray wavelengths. Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO
December 13, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 13, 2012 Wind socks, bow shocks, shockwaves and collisions are often used to describe the phenomena that create high-frequency electromagnetic radiation in the cosmos. From gamma rays down through X-rays and extreme ultraviolet, conventional theories have relied upon … Continue reading
A chain of electrically etched craters in the Alba Terra region of Mars.
Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
December 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 12, 2012 The surface of Mars is electrically eroded. Editor’s note: The following image links require the use of anaglyph glasses to see the 3D effect. What caused the majority of craters on Mars? From a consensus perspective, … Continue reading
Sirius A and its white dwarf companion in X-ray light. Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO
December 11, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 11, 2012 The Sun’s nearest neighbors do not share a similar chemical composition. There are ten stars within 11 light-years of the Sun: Star Name                   Distance Proxima Centauri     … Continue reading
X-ray jet from a quasar said to be over 12 billion light-years away. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NRC/C.Cheung et al; Optical: NASA/STScI; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA
December 9, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 10, 2012 X-rays in space are an electrical phenomenon According to a recent press release, the most distant X-ray jet ever observed is spewing from a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the center of a quasar known as … Continue reading
The Helicon Double Layer Thruster (HDLT). Credit: Australian National University Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering.
December 6, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Dec 07, 2012 Electric double layers are like waterfalls that energize charged particles falling through them. “We have to learn again that science without contact with experiments is an enterprise which is likely to go completely astray into imaginary conjecture.” … Continue reading
Kayapo headdress, C. 1910
December 6, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
  Dec 06, 2012 In parts of the Amazonian rainforest, traditional costume included a headdress consisting of a circular arrangement of feathers. The ring of 36 feathers, most of which are white, lacks an obvious counterpart in the skies we … Continue reading
Signpost. Photographer unknown.
December 5, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 05, 2012 Electric planets exist in an electric Solar System. “The main aurora oval on Jupiter we think should dim when the solar wind blows harder, but what we see is that actually gets brighter, which is totally … Continue reading
A massive cloud of hydrogen is pictured on a collision course
December 4, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 04, 2012 According to astronomers, a cloud of gas with the mass of a small galaxy is approaching the Milky Way. A cloud of hydrogen gas known as Smith’s Cloud, massive enough to be considered a galaxy itself, … Continue reading
0-0-Ice-in-the-Furnace-550x350
December 3, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Dec 03, 2012 Is there frozen water on Mercury? Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice. From what I’ve tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire. But if it had to perish … Continue reading
Strange glow on the lunar horizon. Credit: NASA/Surveyor 7
November 30, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 30, 2012 Static electric charge might help to explain the glowing haze sometimes seen rising 100 kilometers above the Moon’s horizon. Between May 1966 and January 1968, NASA launched the Surveyor missions to the Moon. Each Surveyor spacecraft … Continue reading
What looks like blue light and hot gas but isn’t? Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/BU/E.Blanton; Optical: ESO/VLT
November 29, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Nov 29, 2012 Is hot gas sloshing in a gravitational wine glass—or is astrophysicists’ reasoning going in a circle? A recent press release explains: “Like wine in a glass, vast clouds of hot gas are sloshing back and forth….” The blue … Continue reading
Saturn’s north pole in infrared. Credit: NASA/JPL/Oxford University
November 28, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 28, 2012 Electric Universe advocates were not surprised by Saturn’s hot poles. In a past press release, NASA scientists admitted their surprise at finding a hot north pole on Saturn, although the term “hot” is relative. The temperature … Continue reading
Geological map of Alaska showing various exotic terranes. Credit: USGS
November 27, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 27, 2012 David Pratt’s publication in the year 2000 enumerates multiple problems affecting the theory of plate tectonics and seafloor spreading. The above schematic of Alaska reveals regions of rock strata that appear to have “accreted” to an original craton. Southern … Continue reading
Albedo and elevation images for Oppia crater on Vesta
November 26, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 26, 2012 New images of the third largest asteroid reveal etched chasms and deep holes. The Dawn mission continues in orbit around Vesta. Vesta is ranked high among minor planets, with Pallas (531 kilometers) and Ceres (952 kilometers) … Continue reading
Venus passed in front of the Sun on June 8, 2004
November 22, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 22, 2012 Venus will transit the Sun on June 5, 2012. Venus and Earth describe a unique orbital configuration with respect to the Sun. The resonance between the two planets is readily apparent when a plot of their movements is … Continue reading
The Pillars of Creation. Credit: J. Hester, P. Scowen (ASU) HST/NASA
November 21, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Nov 21, 2012 Rather than being a stellar nursery the famous dust clouds in the Eagle Nebula may already be gone. On November 2, 1995, NASA released the now-famous image of M16, the Eagle Nebula, in the constellation Serpens. Jeff … Continue reading
Caloris Basin on Mercury
November 20, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Nov 20, 2012 Images of Mercury reveal an unusual blend of mineral compounds in its surface structure, as well as a thin atmosphere. The planet Mercury is 4878 kilometers in diameter. The moons Ganymede and Titan are both larger, while … Continue reading
The planetary nebula Fleming 1 seen with ESO’s Very Large Telescope
Credit: ESO/H. Boffin
November 18, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Nov 19, 2012 “Planetary nebulae are glowing shells of gas around white dwarfs,” according to the standard explanation. This is a better description of dogma than of the image. “Astronomers have long debated how these symmetric jets could be created,” … Continue reading
Shallow depressions carved into the Utopia Planitia region on Mars. Note they are crossed by concentric cracks. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona.
November 16, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Nov 16, 2012 Areas of Mars larger than Texas are wrenched and twisted, with deep canyons and sharp fissures, yet they are scoured clean of rocks and dust. In previous Thunderbolts Picture of the Day articles about the areology of … Continue reading
Supposed black hole
November 15, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 15, 2012 Problematic black hole physics is in the news again. In a recent press release from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Pan-STARRS1 telescope in Hawaii, astronomers announced “direct evidence” for the existence of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) … Continue reading
"Young stars" in NGC 346 within the Small Magellanic Cloud.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and A. Nota (STScI/ESA)
November 14, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 14, 2012 The nebular hypothesis is brought out once again to explain how stars are born and age. In 1755, the German philosopher Immanuel Kant proposed that the Sun and the planets of the solar system were originally … Continue reading
NGC 5128
November 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 13, 2012 One of the largest “active galaxies” is thought to be powered by a supermassive black hole. Electrical energy is a more likely driving force. A recent press release from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) announces that the elliptical … Continue reading
Left: 3mm crater electrically etched in sandstone. Credit: C. J. Ransom, VEMASAT Labs.
Right: 150 meter Martian “skylight”. Original image credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
November 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 12, 2012 Deep cylindrical pits on Mars are not easy to explain. Small-scale plasma discharge experiments could offer some clues to their formation. In previous Thunderbolts Picture of the Day articles about unusual geological structures on Mars, it … Continue reading
The Tarantula Nebula
November 9, 2012 by Mel Acheson
Nov 09, 2012 The Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a companion galaxy to the Milky Way, is called a nursery for new stars. The growing awareness of plasma should make it also a nursery for new ideas to … Continue reading
Cygnus X-1
November 7, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Nov 08, 2012 Without a theory of electricity in space, astronomers must explain cosmic lightning with theories of falling gas. To get x-rays from falling gas, the gas must be attracted to a source of gravity with orders-of-magnitude more … Continue reading
Left: Tvashtar “volcanic plume” on Io. Credit: NASA/New Horizons mission.
Right: Solar prominence. Credit: NASA/Marshall Spaceflight Center.
November 7, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Nov 07, 2012 Phenomena throughout the visible universe exhibit features that are twisted and “stringy”. From plume to prominence it is plasma interactions that we see. In previous Picture of the Day articles, there have been many discussions about formations … Continue reading
Clusters of galaxies on the same electric circuit. Credit: ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech/CXC/McGill University
November 6, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 06, 2012 A galaxy-wide filament connects two galactic clusters. The Herschel Space Observatory possesses the largest mirror ever launched into space: 3.5 meters in diameter. Herschel entered orbit around LaGrange point L2 (behind Earth in relation to the Sun) in … Continue reading
Credit: "Squatter man" images gathered by Anthony Peratt
November 5, 2012 by Peter Mungo Jupp
  Nov 05, 2012 Did cosmic lightning wipeout the mammoths? Siberia, Alaska, Malta! Three mass slaughter sites! Sites littered with carcasses and skeletons captured in violent death throes. Some are petrified as rocks (Malta), some are preserved in ice (Siberia), … Continue reading
The center of the Milky Way in multiple wavelengths. Low X-ray bands in blue,
medium bands in green, and high bands in red. Credit: NASA/UMA/D.Wang et al.
November 2, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 02, 2012 The Chandra X-ray Telescope has puzzled astronomers with the discovery of abnormally high temperatures at the core of the Milky Way. A news release announcing this image of the center of the Milky Way stated that … Continue reading
Chaotic terrain on Europa
November 1, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 01, 2012 Do the features on Europa indicate subsurface lakes? I care not what the sailors say: All those dreadful thunder-stones, All that storm that blots the day Can but show that Heaven yawns; Great Europa played the … Continue reading
Starburst galaxy NGC 3310. Credit: NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
Acknowledgment: G.R. Meurer and T.M. Heckman (JHU),
and C. Leitherer, J. Harris and D. Calzetti (STScI), M. Sirianni (JHU)
October 30, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 31, 2012 Scientists working with four of the most sensitive observatories ever built have discovered a galaxy that seems to contradict theories of cosmic evolution. Astronomers from Caltech using NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, Japan’s Subaru Telescope, the Hubble … Continue reading
Coal-black Phoebe. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
October 29, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 30, 2012 Recent analyses suggest that Saturn’s moon Phoebe resembles a planet. Saturn’s moon Phoebe is comparatively small, roughly 220 kilometers in diameter. Its surface gravity is 0.224m/s^2, compared to the 9m/s^2 on Earth. Phoebe is also as black as … Continue reading
Satellite image showing a cloud of Saharan sand blown off the west coast of Africa. Credit: NASA.
October 28, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 29, 2012 Could the Amazon rainforest be only a few thousand years old? The Amazon Rainforest is a moist broadleaf forest that covers most of the Amazon Basin of South America. This basin encompasses seven million square kilometers … Continue reading
A superbubble in the gas (or is it plasma?) of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy (or is it a plasma discharge fragment?) of the Milky Way. 
Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/U.Mich./S.Oey, IR: NASA/JPL, Optical: ESO/WFI/2.2-m
October 25, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Oct 26, 2012 Both nuclear powered stars and electrically powered stars produce bubbles in the plasma surrounding them. From that common observational beginning, the theoretical explanations diverge. Nuclear generated bubbles come in two types: planetary nebulae (PNs) and supernova … Continue reading
Globular star cluster Messier 55
October 24, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Oct 25, 2012 Spherical stars in spherical arrangements From a recent press release: “A new image of Messier 55 from ESO’s VISTA infrared survey telescope shows tens of thousands of stars crowded together like a swarm of bees…. One hundred … Continue reading
“Hairy ring” and “sputtering spiral” around the star R Sculptoris. Consensus theories shuffle shells. Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)
October 23, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Oct 24, 2012 The geometry of gravity is spherical: a uniform attraction toward a center of mass that tends to produce ball-shaped objects. This “bias for balls” predisposes astronomers to interpret rings as spherical shells. The European Southern Observatory press … Continue reading
Neptune's clouds in false color
October 22, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 23, 2012 Neptune is the Solar System’s most remote planet. What drives its extraordinary winds? The winds on Jupiter average about 400 kilometers per hour, with the fastest streaming around the Great Red Spot at 635 kilometers per hour. On … Continue reading
Credit: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2. Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin
October 21, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Oct 22, 2012 To talk about something, we have to conceive ideas and words with which to describe the thing. We can’t avoid these pre-conceptions. But will we try to compensate for this prejudice by conceiving more than one? … Continue reading
Globular cluster M4. Credit: NOAO/AURA/NSF
October 18, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 19, 2012 The light from remote globular clusters should be blue according to theory because the further away one looks the further back in time one sees. It seems as if each new observation from the Hubble Space … Continue reading
Dione crossing Saturn's ring plane
October 17, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Oct 18, 2012 Dione exhibits some unusual features that may indicate electrical forces at work. Recently, the Cassini-Solstice spacecraft made a close flyby of the moon Enceladus. As the Picture of the Day from May 3, 2012 discussed, the bright … Continue reading
The plaque attached to Pioneer 10 now billions of miles from the Sun. Credit: NASA/JPL
October 16, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 17, 2012 Scientists have found a small but significant deceleration in the Pioneer spacecraft as it makes its way through interstellar space. For several years, NASA analysts have reported a slow but steady “tug” on the Pioneer 10 … Continue reading
The south pole of Enceladus. Credit: NASA/Space Science Institute
October 15, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 16, 2012 Enceladus continues to provide evidence supporting Electric Universe theories. On March 2, 2012 the Cassini-Solstice spacecraft flew by Saturn’s moon Enceladus at a distance of 74 kilometers, the closest it will come for the next three … Continue reading
Unnamed crater with “concentric fill” in the northern Martian highlands. Credit: NASA/HiRISE.
October 14, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 15, 2012 Fluvial effects and aeolian processes are said to have eroded the surface of Mars. Could it have been electric discharges? Mars represents a new frontier in the history of science. No celestial body, not even the … Continue reading
Simulated position of the gas cloud's orbit (shown in red). Credit: ESO/MPE/Marc Schartmann
October 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
October 12, 2012 A cloud of interstellar gas and dust will soon be annihilated by a black hole in the center of our galaxy, astronomers say. According to a recent press release: “This is the first time ever that the … Continue reading
X-ray image of Saturn
October 10, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 11, 2012 Both Saturn’s body and its rings are so electrically active that they shine in X-ray light. “Saturn is more like the Sun than the Earth.” — Wal Thornhill Almost everyone knows that one should not look … Continue reading
Unnamed "pit-floor crater" on Mercury. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Smithsonian Institution/Carnegie Institution of Washington
October 9, 2012 by Stephen Smith
 Oct 10, 2012 Rather than volcanic vents, pits in craters could be a sign of electrical activity. On August 3, 2004, NASA launched the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) experiment from the Cape Canaveral facility on a … Continue reading
A 3D image of the Sun in ionized helium light (17.5 nanometers) Credit: NASA
October 8, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Oct 9, 2012 The time has come to let the thermonuclear Sun theory go. Everything has a natural explanation. The Moon is not a god, but a great rock, and the Sun a hot rock. — Anaxagoras, Greek philosopher circa … Continue reading
Ruins of Tiwanaku in Bolivia
October 7, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 08, 2012 Did this ancient site experience a catastrophic end? Tiwanaku, or Tiahuanaco in Spanish, is a ruined citadel occupying almost 10 square kilometers in the Bolivian Andes at an altitude greater than 3800 meters. Carbon-14 dating methods … Continue reading
Saturn's rings are diffuse. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
October 4, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 05, 2012 The Cassini-Solstice mission discovered that there might be more rings around Saturn than can be seen with telescopes. “It seems almost incredible that such a ring of cosmic dust should be able to exist for ever, … Continue reading
New infrared image of NGC 4594, the Sombrero galaxy. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
October 3, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 04, 2012 The Sombrero galaxy appears to be a giant elliptical galaxy with an embedded disk. One of the most significant contributions to plasma cosmology comes from Dr. Anthony L. Peratt, a plasma physicist and protégé of the … Continue reading
"Solar Flare" by FracFx at Deviantart.com
October 2, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Oct 03, 2012 Thermonuclear fusion reactions from deep in the core are said to drive the Sun. Hypothetically, how does the Sun produce heat and light enough to sustain life on Earth at a mean distance of 149,476,000 kilometers? According … Continue reading
Part of the IceCube neutrino observatory in Antarctica
October 1, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 02, 2012 New studies suggest that the origin of the strongest cosmic rays is still mysterious. Cosmic rays are energetic ions from space that arrive in the Sun’s local neighborhood traveling at extremely high velocities. About 90% of … Continue reading
Orbital diagram of comet 2012 S1. Credit: JPL Small Body Database.
September 30, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Oct 01, 2012 Are comets “dirty snowballs”? Comet 2012 S1, an object approximately three kilometers in diameter, is presently inside the orbit of Jupiter. It is “remarkably bright” according to astronomers, although it is still millions of kilometers from the … Continue reading
"The Truth Lies Within" by Jim Muth.
September 27, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 28, 2012 Astronomical research in the virtual realm instigates foregone conclusions. “It is only because the majority opinion will always be opposed by some that our knowledge and understanding progress.” — Friedrich Hayek The most important issue separating … Continue reading
Dark chocolate
September 26, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 27, 2012 (This TPOD first ran on April 20, 2012)  More nails in the dark matter coffin. Dark matter is supposed to be what holds the Universe together. However, modern telescopes are not able to see it because … Continue reading
Topographic map of Mars. Credit: Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA)
September 25, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 26, 2012 Did sulfurous compounds from ancient volcanoes help warm up Mars and form the now extinct Martian oceans? Speculations about the existence of liquid oceans on Mars have been around for centuries. The Mars Science Laboratory, known … Continue reading
NGC 2070
September 24, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 26, 2012 Luminous nebulae confirm Electric Universe theory. 30 Doradus, otherwise known as the Tarantula Nebula, is a large glowing region in one of the closest galaxies to the Milky Way, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A well-known supernova, 1987a, exploded … Continue reading
The Crab Nebula pulsar, a theoretical neutron star. Credit: NASA/CXC/ASU/J. Hester et al.
September 23, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 24, 2012 Could there be “warped space-time” around so-called “neutron stars”? The smeared lines of an iron spectrum have given astronomers another mystery to solve when it comes to explaining the Universe. Using the XMM-Newton and the JAXA/NASA … Continue reading
Composite image of galaxy cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745 from HST and Chandra.
Credit: X-ray (NASA/CXC/IfA/C. Ma et al.); Optical (NASA/STScI/IfA/C. Ma et al.)
September 20, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Sep 21, 2012 Astronomers have detected a strand of galaxies and gas flowing into a remote cluster. The predominant cosmological hypotheses within which most astronomers conduct their research are based on a gravity-only paradigm. Moving masses and heat are the … Continue reading
Dark looking region against the Sun's bright background
September 19, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 20, 2012 Charged vortices erupting from the Sun can form relatively dark cavities. Recently, much has been made about a so-called “black sphere connected to the Sun.” Outlandish claims that a solid object was in close solar orbit, “feeding” … Continue reading
The Great Red Spot on Jupiter surrounded by smaller rotating cells. Credit: Voyager 2/NASA-JPL.
September 18, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 19, 2012 Is the famous gyre on Jupiter the result of atmospheric convection? The red spot in Jupiter’s atmosphere has persisted for more than 300 years, at least as long as there have been telescopes on Earth able … Continue reading
Ring around Fomalhaut. ESA/Herschel/PACS/Bram Acke, KU Leuven, Belgium
September 17, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Sep 18, 2012 Rings around stars confirm Electric Universe theory. A recent press release from the European Space Agency announces that a ring around the star Fomalhaut (Fo-mal-HOUT) demonstrates “the glow from dust in the debris disc – a structure resembling … Continue reading
Artist's conception of flaring black hole GX 339-4
September 16, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 17, 2012 Black hole theory contradicts itself. Most astrophysicists try to explain narrow jets erupting from various sources by using words like “nozzle” or “high pressure,” contradicting the known behavior of gases in a vacuum. For example, according … Continue reading
Pencil Nebula. Credit: ESO
September 13, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Sep 14, 2012 This recent image of the Pencil Nebula from La Silla Observatory showcases a cosmic counterpart to “hair” discharges from Tesla coils. Electric forces separate the plasma into parallel filaments. Magnetic forces further constrict them (the “z … Continue reading
The Orion Nebula
September 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 13, 2012 Million-degree plasma in the Orion Nebula comes not from the kinetic excitation of cold gas, but from the electric currents of space. For many years astrophysical theories of stellar and galactic development have been relegated to … Continue reading
The surface of Comet Wild 2 (left). Saturn's moon Phoebe (right). Credit: NASA/JPL
September 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 12, 2012 Comets are said to be composed of “dusty ices.” Why have crystalline structures that require high temperatures been found in them? On February 7, 1999 NASA launched the Stardust spacecraft on a mission to collect dust … Continue reading
Evolution of an artist’s illustration into an inside-out star
September 10, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Sep 11, 2012 Is Cassiopeia A (Cas A) dying or just changing her fashion? Bio 1: In the beginning was an artist’s illustration of the consensus theory of stellar evolution. Thermonuclear fusion reactions at the center of the star … Continue reading
The Orion Nebula. Credit: Vasco Soeiro
September 9, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 10, 2012 Rather than simply clouds of dust and gas, spiraling filaments in nebulae suggest electric currents in space. The Orion Nebula is faintly visible to the naked eye as the second star in Orion’s sword. It looks … Continue reading
Curiosity's cameras focus on its own tracks in the Martian desert. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
September 6, 2012 by Stephen Smith
   Sep 07, 2012 The Mars Science Laboratory has begun its journey to Mount Sharp Mars is composed mostly of iron and silicon, with massive quantities of oxygen bound into the soils and bedrock. Although quite a bit like Earth’s … Continue reading
Saturn's twin aurorae
September 5, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 06, 2012 Astrophysicists are beginning to acknowledge the role that electricity plays in space. The Cassini-Huygens mission (now called Cassini-Equinox) was launched from Cape Canaveral on October 15, 1997. Its primary mission is the exploration of the Saturnian system, including Saturn’s atmosphere, … Continue reading
Image181-550x584
September 4, 2012 by Mel Acheson
   Sep 05, 2012 Astronomers have finally observed “dark galaxies,” proving again that if you look hard enough for what you believe, you’ll find it (or something that’s close enough). Dark galaxies, like the many other dark things in modern … Continue reading
Europa, Earth and the Moon
September 3, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 04, 2012 Could an ocean of liquid water exist on Europa? According to a recent press release, “Sending a submarine to the bottom of the ocean on Jupiter’s icy moon Europa is the most exciting potential mission in planetary … Continue reading
The Sun is not an oblate spheroid.
September 2, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Sep 03, 2012 Astronomers have recently taken more precise measurements of the Sun’s shape over several years. They found that it was rounder and less variable than they expected from theory. If gravity and centrifugal force from its rotation … Continue reading
'Thunderstones' in the form of fulgurites
August 30, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
August 31, 2012 Leaving no stone unturned, some thunderstones may have acquired their association with lightning in still other ways. As mentioned in part three of this article, a future realisation that the Australites may actually have precipitated within the … Continue reading
Gravity anomalies on the Moon
August 29, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 30, 2012 A new mission to map the gravity field of the Moon. On September 10, 2011 NASA launched the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) satellites on a mission to the Moon. GRAIL-A and GRAIL-B are nearly identical … Continue reading
Australite in flanged button shape, backside, diameter 20 millimetres, weight 3.5 grams. Courtesy Herbert Raab (2006).
August 28, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
August 29, 2012 ‘Thunderstones’ in the form of tektites – Did human beings watch them falling? As an additional possibility of no small importance, the concept of the thunderstone may have been sparked by a conflation of lightning with meteors … Continue reading
Mercury's north pole
August 27, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 28, 2012 Mercury reveals the violence of planetary genesis. Mercury’s story is probably a complicated tale of extremes. The planet’s surface is heavily scarred, with steep-walled canyons, scarps that rise up several kilometers, and craters that penetrate the crust … Continue reading
‘Thunderstones’ in the form of fossil belemnites (Belemnitidia)
August 26, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
August 27, 2012 That many a thunderstone earned the sobriquet by virtue of its exposure during a thunderstorm strikes one as correct to a degree. Intellectual lassitude perfuses the attempts of those who blamed the conception of the thunderstone on … Continue reading
'Thunderstones' in the form of prehistoric flint arrowheads
August 23, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
August 24, 2012 The thunderstone is familiar from the folklore of virtually every culture, but plays no ‘roll’ in the serious sciences. In the eyes of most, the proposition that thunderbolts deposit rocks is an asinine artefact of superstitious belief … Continue reading
Looping solar prominence
August 22, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 23, 2012 Heliophysicists acknowledge the role of plasma in solar eruptions but miss important aspects of its behavior. In Bengal to move at all Is seldom, if ever, done, But mad dogs and Englishmen Go out in the midday … Continue reading
Gamma ray "bubbles" and a tilted jet are seen erupting from the center of the Milky Way in this artist's conception. Credit: David A. Aguilar/CfA
August 22, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 22, 2012 Astronomers continue to ignore electricity in space, opting for outdated ideas about gravity and heat. Recently, astronomers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics announced that our own Milky Way galaxy is expelling enormous jets of gamma rays … Continue reading
(Top) Ceres and Dione. (Bottom) Tethys. Credit: NASA/JPL
August 20, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 21, 2012 The Dawn spacecraft will arrive at Ceres in August of 2015 Ceres is the largest asteroid in the Solar System. The most recent measurement from the Hubble Space Telescope puts it at approximately 975 kilometers in mean … Continue reading
Filaments of dust obscure starlight near the center of the Milky Way. Credit: ESO
August 19, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Aug 20, 2012 It twists like a Birkeland Current; it’s stringy like a Birkeland Current; it’s dense like a Birkeland Current; but Everyone Knows (if they want to pursue a career in astronomy) that There is No Such Thing … Continue reading
'Nothing to see here. Move along!'
August 16, 2012 by Stephen J. Crothers
Aug 17, 2012 Brian Schmidt et al. authored the paper Formation of the Black Hole in Nova Scorpii, The Astrophysical Journal, 567:491-502, 2002 March 1. Editor’s note: Many Picture of the Day articles have been written about the problems with so-called … Continue reading
The Northern Lights above Lake Superior. Photographer unknown.
August 15, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Aug 16, 2012 Recent X-class solar flares have ignited the polar lights. An electrically active magnetotail (or plasma tail) extends for millions of kilometers from Earth. Charged particles from the Sun, otherwise known as the solar wind, together with ions generated … Continue reading
The Raymondi (1200-200 BCE).
August 14, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
    Aug 15, 2012 Even the lonely monuments left behind have a story to tell. Chavín de Huantar, in the Peruvian Andes, is one of many civilisations to have preceded the mighty Inca empire. The occupants of the ruins … Continue reading
Coat of Arms
August 13, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
  Aug 14, 2012 Why are animals used so widely in coats of arms? The familiar red dragon of Wales and the double-headed eagle of the House of Habsburg exemplify a widespread and familiar practice to embed animal figures in … Continue reading
A giant crater on Iapetus
August 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  August 13, 2012 Is it gravity and heat that cause landslides on Iapetus? Recently, the science journal Nature Geoscience described giant, icy landslides that are supposedly taking place on the Saturnian moon Iapetus. According to the report, it is … Continue reading
Orion Nebula
August 9, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 09, 2012 What causes the rapid changes observed in Orion Nebula “protostars”? Using a combination of NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the ESA Herschel Space Observatory, astronomers found that so-called “young stars” are changing in brightness much faster than … Continue reading
A planet made of compressed carbon is said to be orbiting a neutron star.
August 8, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 09, 2012 A star becomes a diamond? A recent press release announced the “discovery” of a planet in orbit around a pulsar that is thought to have once been a star, but is now a planetary body composed of … Continue reading
Trenches cut in the Martian soil by the robot scoop onboard the Phoenix lander.
August 7, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  August 08, 2012 The significance of life on other planets leaves many unanswered questions. Note: 32 years ago the managing editor’s father speculated about the possibility and significance of extraterrestrial life. The universal feeling that man is unique has … Continue reading
Planck image showing carbon monoxide distribution in the galactic plane
August 6, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 07, 2012 Astronomers continue to cling to outmoded theories of star formation The European Space Agency (ESA) launched the Planck telescope platform on May 19, 2009 into an orbit around Lagrange point L2. Planck is designed to analyze the cosmic microwave background … Continue reading
The Mars Science Laboratory
August 5, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 06, 2012 The Mars rover Curiosity is on schedule for touchdown at 12:31 AM CDT on August 6, 2012. Curiosity is five times heavier than the Mars Exploration Rovers “Opportunity” and “Spirit,” with upgraded instrumentation, including a high definition … Continue reading
A detail from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field image
August 2, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 03, 2012 A new theory states that dark matter might prevent stars from aging normally and preserve them for billions of years. According to astronomers, the Universe is almost 14 billion years old. It started out with a bang … Continue reading
A portion of the Rimae Burg graben on the Moon
August 1, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 02, 2012 Did tectonic and volcanic forces create the wide, parallel trenches on the Moon? The Moon has seen cataclysmic devastation at some time in its past. There are giant craters, wide and deep valleys, and multi-kilometer long rilles … Continue reading
Pluto and its five moons are considered to be Kuiper Belt Objects.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and M. Showalter (SETI Institute)
July 31, 2012 by Stephen Smith
August 1, 2012 According to astronomers and their theories about the Solar System, the space beyond Neptune is getting stranger all the time. Near the end of the eighteenth century the nebular hypothesis was born. It grew in popularity for … Continue reading
Plasma "tornadoes" on the Sun
July 30, 2012 by Stephen Smith
July 31, 2012 Strands of magnetically confined plasma can be seen throughout the cosmos. A rotating vortex of solar plasma was the topic of a recent press release. Does that phenomenon relate to other energetic vortices? Previous Picture of the Day … Continue reading
Polar cloud vortex on Titan
July 29, 2012 by Stephen Smith
July 30, 2012 Images from Cassini seem to indicate deltas and river channels. Could electricity have formed these features on Titan? Recent data from the Cassini-Solstice mission is said to reveal oceans of liquid ethane, in one case occupying an … Continue reading
A visualization of the dark matter halo surrounding a large cluster of galaxies.
July 26, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Jul 27, 2012 Dark matter is in the news. “Plasma phenomena are scalable. Their electrical and physical properties remain the same, independent of the size of the plasma.” — Donald Scott, author of The Electric Sky Plasma in space … Continue reading
Jean-Jaques D'Ortous de Mairan (1678-1771)
July 25, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
July 26, 2012 ‘Plasma mythology’ may be defined as the study of plasmas, specifically near-earth plasmas, in human traditions, such as mythology and proto-scientific records. If this is a discipline, one of its most notable pioneers must be the French … Continue reading
Hole 2
July 24, 2012 by Michael Armstrong
  Image Credit: NASA, JPL, U. Arizona    Jul 25, 2012 With no explanation for the surrounding crater, mainstream astronomy imagines this to be a hole leading to an underground cavern. The challenges to this view should be obvious. The … Continue reading
Credit: ESO, APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO), A. Weiss et al., NASA Spitzer Science Center
July 23, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Jul 24, 2012 Fourteen years ago, Halton Arp published Seeing Red. Chapter 6, “Clusters of Galaxies,” presented his finding that the clusters were low-luminosity high-redshift—and nearby—“star piles.” There was not then and there has not been since any discussion … Continue reading
F. Gutekunst, Ignatius Loyola Donnelly (c. 1898)
July 22, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
  From left to right: F. Gutekunst, Ignatius Loyola Donnelly (c. 1898). Courtesy Minnesota Historical Society, Saint Paul, Minnesota. Anonymous, William Comyns Beaumont (date unknown). Bob Kobres, Immanuel Velikovsky (1978) July 23, 2012 In bestsellers published in 1882 and 1883, … Continue reading
Jacob Ferdinand Voet
July 19, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
  From left to right: Jacob Ferdinand Voet, Thomas Burnet (1675). Courtesy National Portrait Gallery, London. William Whiston (18th century), anonymous. Giovanni Rinaldo of Carli-Rubbi (date unknown).   Jul 20, 2012 Ever since 1950, ‘Velikovsky’ has been a household name, … Continue reading
Sunspot 1402
July 18, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Jul 19, 2012 An X-2 class solar flare recently missed a direct impact with Earth. Heliophysicists classify solar flares according to their brightness in X-ray wavelengths. C-class flares are the smallest on the scale, with X-ray measurements in the … Continue reading
Drawing of the Aurora Borealis
July 17, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
  July 18, 2012 In June 2012, a team of 4 Japanese researchers revealed in Nature that “an extremely energetic event occurred around our space environment in AD 775.” An analysis of Japanese cedar trees showed a “rapid increase” in … Continue reading
The Vela supernova remnant
July 17, 2012 by Stephen Smith
July 17, 2012 Some so-called “neutron star pulsars” are said to create nebulae as they spin. The standard model of stellar evolution proposes that pulsars are neutron stars rotating at incredible speed. For example, PSR J1748-2446ad, in the globular cluster Terzan … Continue reading
The Himalayas
July 15, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  July 16, 2012 Are geologic events cyclic? It seems possible that plasma interactions with Earth and other charged bodies in space or the impact on our biosphere from ion beams, could disrupt all the elemental changes that are used … Continue reading
Makhtesh Ramon
July 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
July 13, 2012 Is this elongated crater in the Negev desert the result of water erosion? Ramon Crater in Israel is the largest erosion crater known, measuring 40 kilometers long by 10 kilometers at its widest point. The Hebrew word … Continue reading
Colliding galaxy clusters
July 11, 2012 by Mel Acheson
July 12, 2012 El Gordo is so called because it is the biggest, brightest, and hottest pair of colliding galaxy clusters known to astronomers. Astronomers “know” that El Gordo is over 7 billion light-years from Earth. This knowledge derives from the amount … Continue reading
An M-class solar flare from April 2012
July 10, 2012 by Peter Mungo Jupp
  July 11, 2012 Could wild electromagnetic activity hold the key to the madness that is war and revolution? You lie strapped to a bed as 800 Milliamps of electrical current pounds through your brain. Your depressive numbness is slowly … Continue reading
Surface granulation on the Sun
July 9, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  July 10, 2012 How the Sun’s interior generates its magnetic field is a long-standing mystery for heliophysicists. It is commonly believed that there is an electromagnetic dynamo inside the Sun. That dynamo has long been thought to be powered … Continue reading
The warped ring in the center of the Milky Way
July 8, 2012 by Stephen Smith
July 09, 2012 Plasma instabilities are a better explanation for the Milky Way’s strangely distorted central ring. According to a recent press release, “…observations from the Herschel Space Observatory show a bizarre, twisted ring of dense gas at the center of … Continue reading
Artist's illustration of a hypothetical dust ring around a star. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
July 5, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  July 06, 2012 What happened to the ring of dust circling TYC 8241 2652 in the constellation Centaurus? A recent press release expresses surprise and confusion about the absence of a stellar dust ring that seems to have vanished … Continue reading
New infrared image of the Helix Nebula in Aquarius
July 4, 2012 by Mel Acheson
July 05, 2012 A recent image of the Helix Nebula in the constellation Aquarius exposes more details of its electrical structure. The new infrared image shows radial Birkeland currents (called “strands” in the press release) crossing the concentric rings and converging … Continue reading
A strong jet stream in Saturn's atmosphere (upper center, right). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI
July 3, 2012 by Michael Armstrong
July 04, 2012 The light is there but astrophysics is slow to catch up to it Over its considerable lifetime NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has collected a vast number of observations concerning the planet Saturn. Saturn, like the other gas giants … Continue reading
Aristarchus crater on the Moon
July 2, 2012 by Stephen Smith
July 02, 2012 The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is providing more evidence for the Electric Universe theory. The Moon has intrigued humanity since the beginning. Where did it come from? What is it made of? Today, those questions remain unanswered, for … Continue reading
The south polar region of Io
July 1, 2012 by Stephen Smith
July 02, 2012 Io has puzzled planetary scientists for years. Electric Universe advocates are not so mystified. “The Io close-up shows a surface that bears all of the classic features of a spark-machined surface—the flat clean crater floors and steep … Continue reading
The surface of Ganymede. Credit: NASA/JPL
June 29, 2012 by Stephen Smith
 June 29, 2012 The only moon in the Solar System with an all-encompassing magnetic field continues to be a source of speculation. Over the last three decades, beginning with Pioneer 10 in 1973 and including the most recent visit by … Continue reading
Galaxy AM 0644-741
June 27, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 28, 2012 Galactic haloes are best explained using the Electric Universe theory. There are rings around planets, rings around stars, and there are rings around galactic nuclei, as demonstrated by the Hubble Space Telescope image of AM 0644-741. Although … Continue reading
Callisto transformed by Zeus into a constellation
June 26, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Callisto transformed by Zeus into a constellation. Credit: Uranographia by Johannes Hevelius June 27, 2012 The Galileo mission’s exploration of Jupiter and its environs provided substantial evidence for the Electric Universe hypothesis. The Galileo spacecraft was launched October 18, 1989, … Continue reading
The Superlative Quasar (the red dot near center)
June 25, 2012 by Mel Acheson
June 26, 2012 If redshift (z) indicates distance, then astronomers have discovered the superlative object: the most distant, the most ancient, the most luminous, the most massive. Analysis of the object’s spectrum shows that its lines have shifted toward the red by … Continue reading
The floating water bridge. Credit: Fuchs homepage
June 24, 2012 by Mel Acheson
June 25, 2012 Discoveries in space plasma may provide an explanation for a century-old mystery. Sir William Armstrong, an English hydraulics engineer, first observed the floating water bridge in 1893. It defied explanation and was ignored until recently. Findings in … Continue reading
Color image of Rachmaninoff basin
June 21, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 22, 2012 The MESSENGER spacecraft has recently been approved for an extended mission in Mercury orbit. The Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral on August 3, 2004. On March 17, 2011 … Continue reading
An exploding double layer on the Sun
June 20, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 21, 2012 Is it the breaking and reconnecting of magnetic field lines that power solar phenomena? According to a popular view of the Sun, its core pressure is supposed to be so high that it crushes hydrogen atoms together … Continue reading
SN1994D, a supernova in NGC 4526
June 19, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 20, 2012 NASA computer simulations are not able to correctly model supernova explosions. Contemporary astrophysical models of stellar evolution rely on the mechanical action of cold gas collapsing from gravitational impetus. Stars are seen as whirling vortices of compressed … Continue reading
A traditional cosmology based on Icelandic mythology and a scientific cosmology
June 18, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
June 19, 2012 Science and folk tradition are supposed to be strictly separate domains of knowledge, but in practice they often shade into each other. The image shown above right attempts to map the entire visible universe. The galaxies tend to collect … Continue reading
0-windy-waves-550x550a
June 17, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 18, 2012 Wind socks, bow shocks, shockwaves and collisions are often used to describe the phenomena that create high-frequency electromagnetic radiation in the cosmos. From gamma rays down through X-rays and extreme ultraviolet, conventional theories have relied upon gravity … Continue reading
Sirius A and its white dwarf companion in X-ray light. Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO
June 14, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 15, 2012 The Sun’s nearest neighbors do not share a similar chemical composition. There are ten stars within 11 light-years of the Sun: Star Name                       Distance Proxima Centauri … Continue reading
Kayapo headdress, C. 1910
June 13, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
June 14, 2012 In parts of the Amazonian rainforest, traditional costume included a headdress consisting of a circular arrangement of feathers. The ring of 36 feathers, most of which are white, lacks an obvious counterpart in the skies we see … Continue reading
Signpost. Photographer unknown.
June 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 13, 2012 Electric planets exist in an electric Solar System. “The main aurora oval on Jupiter we think should dim when the solar wind blows harder, but what we see is that actually gets brighter, which is totally counter … Continue reading
A massive cloud of hydrogen is pictured on a collision course
June 11, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 12, 2012 According to astronomers, a cloud of gas with the mass of a small galaxy is approaching the Milky Way. A cloud of hydrogen gas known as Smith’s Cloud, massive enough to be considered a galaxy itself, may … Continue reading
What looks like blue light and hot gas but isn’t? Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/BU/E.Blanton; Optical: ESO/VLT
June 10, 2012 by Mel Acheson
June 10, 2012 Is hot gas sloshing in a gravitational wine glass—or is astrophysicists’ reasoning going in a circle? A recent press release explains: “Like wine in a glass, vast clouds of hot gas are sloshing back and forth….” The blue image … Continue reading
Geological map of Alaska showing various exotic terranes. Credit: USGS
June 8, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 8, 2012 David Pratt’s publication in the year 2000 enumerates multiple problems affecting the theory of plate tectonics and seafloor spreading. The above schematic of Alaska reveals regions of rock strata that appear to have “accreted” to an original … Continue reading
Albedo and elevation images for Oppia crater on Vesta
June 6, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 07, 2012 New images of the third largest asteroid reveal etched chasms and deep holes. The Dawn mission continues in orbit around Vesta. Vesta is ranked high among minor planets, with Pallas (531 kilometers) and Ceres (952 kilometers) as … Continue reading
Venus transit June 2012. Photo by Rens Van Der Sluijs.
June 5, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
June 5, 2012 On 5 and 6 June 2012, Venus will appear to move across the face of the sun – a rare event, which will not be repeated until 2117. The occasion provides an excellent opportunity to reflect on … Continue reading
Artist's depiction of the solar heliosphere
June 4, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 05, 2012 Matter from the Interstellar Medium has been detected by Voyager 1. A postulate of the Electric Sun hypothesis presupposes the Sun to be the positive terminal in a circuit, or anode. The negative electrode, or “virtual” cathode, … Continue reading
Venus passed in front of the Sun on June 8, 2004
June 3, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 04, 2012 Venus will transit the Sun on June 5, 2012. Venus and Earth describe a unique orbital configuration with respect to the Sun. The resonance between the two planets is readily apparent when a plot of their movements … Continue reading
"Dark Energy"
June 1, 2012 by Stephen Smith
June 01, 2012 Dark energy continues to be an astronomical mystery. A new European Space Agency (ESA) space-based telescope named Euclid, after the ancient Greek philosopher, has received approval for development, with a tentative launch date sometime in 2019. According … Continue reading
Martian landscape within a quart bottle
May 30, 2012 by Frederic Jueneman
May 31, 2012 Throughout human history the planet Mars has held mankind’s rapt attention. When telescopes were sufficiently advanced by the late nineteenth century, the red planet seasonally fogged over with dust storms. After such storms it appeared to darken … Continue reading
Caloris Basin on Mercury
May 29, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 30, 2012 Images of Mercury reveal an unusual blend of mineral compounds in its surface structure, as well as a thin atmosphere. The planet Mercury is 4878 kilometers in diameter. The moons Ganymede and Titan are both larger, while … Continue reading
NGC 3842
May 28, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 29, 2012 This TPOD was originally published on December 5, 2011. More news about black holes is increasing the distortion of reason. According to a recent press release, two black holes with masses exceeding “9 billion times the mass of … Continue reading
Medusae Fossae on Mars
May 28, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 28, 2012 What carved these landforms? Mars has been the subject of many previous Picture of the Day articles. Since its surface is preserved in a desert-like deep freeze, and appears devoid of water erosion, it is an excellent … Continue reading
Supposed black hole
May 24, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 25, 2012 Problematic black hole physics is in the news again. In a recent press release from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Pan-STARRS1 telescope in Hawaii, astronomers announced “direct evidence” for the existence of a supermassive black hole … Continue reading
Gamma-ray sources in the sky
May 23, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 24, 2012 Gamma-rays are said to be particles with no mass, yet possessed of extreme momentum. According to a recent press release, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected several unidentified sources of intense gamma-ray emissions that are not seen … Continue reading
NGC 5128
May 22, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 23, 2012 One of the largest “active galaxies” is thought to be powered by a supermassive black hole. Electrical energy is a more likely driving force. A recent press release from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) announces that the … Continue reading
The Tarantula Nebula
May 21, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  May 22, 2012 The Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a companion galaxy to the Milky Way, is called a nursery for new stars. The growing awareness of plasma should make it also a nursery for new ideas … Continue reading
Cygnus X-1
May 20, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  May 21, 2012 Without a theory of electricity in space, astronomers must explain cosmic lightning with theories of falling gas. To get x-rays from falling gas, the gas must be attracted to a source of gravity with orders-of-magnitude more … Continue reading
Clusters of galaxies on the same electric circuit. Credit: ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech/CXC/McGill University
May 18, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 18, 2012 A galaxy-wide filament connects two galactic clusters. The Herschel Space Observatory possesses the largest mirror ever launched into space: 3.5 meters in diameter. Herschel entered orbit around LaGrange point L2 (behind Earth in relation to the Sun) … Continue reading
Chaotic terrain on Europa
May 16, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 17, 2012 Do the features on Europa indicate subsurface lakes? I care not what the sailors say: All those dreadful thunder-stones, All that storm that blots the day Can but show that Heaven yawns; Great Europa played the fool … Continue reading
Coal-black Phoebe. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
May 15, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 16, 2012 Recent analyses suggest that Saturn’s moon Phoebe resembles a planet. Saturn’s moon Phoebe is comparatively small, roughly 220 kilometers in diameter. Its surface gravity is 0.224m/s^2, compared to the 9m/s^2 on Earth. Phoebe is also as black … Continue reading
Asteroid Lutetia
May 14, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  May 15, 2012 The key to modern knowledge is the exclusion of disproof and other possibilities. From the press release (emphasis added): Data from [five instruments] were combined to create the most complete spectrum of an asteroid ever assembled. This spectrum … Continue reading
PIA14759
May 13, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 14, 2012 After a long winter, the Mars Exploration Rover B is starting to roll through the Martian terrain. The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity has been traveling across the face of the Red Planet since Sunday, January 5, … Continue reading
Globular star cluster Messier 55
May 10, 2012 by Mel Acheson
May 11, 2012 Spherical stars in spherical arrangements From a recent press release: “A new image of Messier 55 from ESO’s VISTA infrared survey telescope shows tens of thousands of stars crowded together like a swarm of bees…. One hundred … Continue reading
Neptune's clouds in false color
May 9, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 10, 2012 Neptune is the Solar System’s most remote planet. What drives its extraordinary winds? The winds on Jupiter average about 400 kilometers per hour, with the fastest streaming around the Great Red Spot at 635 kilometers per hour. On Saturn, … Continue reading
ISS030-E-254011_lrg
May 8, 2012 by Stephen Smith
 May 9, 2012 Is this Algerian crater the result of an asteroid impact? Previous Picture of the Day articles have taken up the question of cratering on planets and moons. In the larger sense, that of the Solar System as … Continue reading
Dione crossing Saturn's ring plane
May 7, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 08, 2012 Dione exhibits some unusual features that may indicate electrical forces at work. Recently, the Cassini-Solstice spacecraft made a close flyby of the moon Enceladus. As the Picture of the Day from May 3, 2012 discussed, the bright … Continue reading
Uranus with a few of its moons
May 6, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 07, 2012 Uranus recently erupted with a new bright region in its lower latitudes. Could electrical effects be responsible? The planet Uranus revolves around the Sun at a mean orbital radius of 2,870,990,000 kilometers, 19 times as far as … Continue reading
The south pole of Enceladus. Credit: NASA/Space Science Institute
May 3, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 04, 2012 Enceladus continues to provide evidence supporting Electric Universe theories. On March 2, 2012 the Cassini-Solstice spacecraft flew by Saturn’s moon Enceladus at a distance of 74 kilometers, the closest it will come for the next three years. … Continue reading
X-ray image of Saturn
May 2, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 03, 2012 Both Saturn’s body and its rings are so electrically active that they shine in X-ray light. “Saturn is more like the Sun than the Earth.” — Wal Thornhill Almost everyone knows that one should not look directly … Continue reading
A 3D image of the Sun in ionized helium light (17.5 nanometers) Credit: NASA
May 1, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 02, 2012 The time has come to let the thermonuclear Sun theory go. Everything has a natural explanation. The Moon is not a god, but a great rock, and the Sun a hot rock. — Anaxagoras, Greek philosopher circa … Continue reading
Jupiter
April 30, 2012 by Stephen Smith
May 01, 2012 A new spacecraft will orbit Jupiter for over a year. On August 5, 2011 NASA launched the Juno Mission to Jupiter. After traveling out past the orbit of Mars, the spacecraft will return for a gravity assist … Continue reading
Ruins of Tiwanaku in Bolivia
April 30, 2012 by Stephen Smith
April 30, 2012 Did this ancient site experience a catastrophic end? Tiwanaku, or Tiahuanaco in Spanish, is a ruined citadel occupying almost 10 square kilometers in the Bolivian Andes at an altitude greater than 3800 meters. Carbon-14 dating methods suggest … Continue reading
New infrared image of NGC 4594, the Sombrero galaxy. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
April 27, 2012 by Stephen Smith
April 27, 2012 The Sombrero galaxy appears to be a giant elliptical galaxy with an embedded disk. One of the most significant contributions to plasma cosmology comes from Dr. Anthony L. Peratt, a plasma physicist and protégé of the Nobel … Continue reading
The Aurora Australis
April 25, 2012 by Stephen Smith
April 26, 2012 Earth’s aurorae demonstrate the electrical connection between our planet and the Sun. The Sun unleashed another coronal mass ejection (CME) on October 22, 2011, causing an outburst of colorful displays in nighttime skies as far south as Arkansas, in the United … Continue reading
Part of the IceCube neutrino observatory in Antarctica
April 24, 2012 by Stephen Smith
April 25, 2012 New studies suggest that the origin of the strongest cosmic rays is still mysterious. Cosmic rays are energetic ions from space that arrive in the Sun’s local neighborhood traveling at extremely high velocities. About 90% of all … Continue reading
Globular cluster M14 (NGC 6402)
April 23, 2012 by Stephen Smith
April 24, 2012 There are more globular clusters around the Milky Way than there ought to be. Stars form along filaments of electric current that flow through, into, and out of our galaxy. Studies of galactic magnetic fields show that … Continue reading
This artist’s impression shows the Milky Way galaxy surrounded by impressionistic dark matter. Credit: ESO/L. Calçada
April 22, 2012 by Mel Acheson
April 23, 2012 The missing matter that has to be there to account for the “fast” rotation of the Milky Way’s arms is missing. Recent measurements of the velocities of stars within 13,000 light-years of the Sun have allowed astronomers … Continue reading
Dark chocolate
April 19, 2012 by Stephen Smith
April 20, 2012 More nails in the dark matter coffin. Dark matter is supposed to be what holds the Universe together. However, modern telescopes are not able to see it because it does not interact with luminous matter, except gravitationally. … Continue reading
Composite x-ray and infrared image of a nearby purported supernova remnant
April 18, 2012 by Mel Acheson
April 19, 2012 The problem with astronomy is not that the stars are so far away or that modern instruments are expensive. The problem with astronomy is the human tendency to blink when something unexpected comes at you quickly. For … Continue reading
NGC 2070
April 17, 2012 by Stephen Smith
April 18, 2012 Luminous nebulae confirm Electric Universe theory. 30 Doradus, otherwise known as the Tarantula Nebula, is a large glowing region in one of the closest galaxies to the Milky Way, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A well-known supernova, 1987a, … Continue reading
Artist’s impression of imagined fog
April 16, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  Apr 16, 2012 Redshift measurements of five galaxies verify what astronomers have always believed—if their beliefs are true. The nice thing about math is that it provides results that are absolutely true. Unless you’ve made errors in your addition, … Continue reading
Dark looking region against the Sun's bright background
April 15, 2012 by Stephen Smith
April 16, 2012 Charged vortices erupting from the Sun can form relatively dark cavities. Recently, much has been made about a so-called “black sphere connected to the Sun.” Outlandish claims that a solid object was in close solar orbit, “feeding” … Continue reading
Ring around Fomalhaut. ESA/Herschel/PACS/Bram Acke, KU Leuven, Belgium
April 13, 2012 by Stephen Smith
April 13, 2012  Rings around stars confirm Electric Universe theory. A recent press release from the European Space Agency announces that a ring around the star Fomalhaut (Fo-mal-HOUT) demonstrates “the glow from dust in the debris disc – a structure … Continue reading
Mount Sharp
April 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Apr 12, 2012 Planetary scientists admit that the central mound in Gale crater was not created by crustal rebound. On November 6, 2011 NASA launched the Mars Science Laboratory rover, otherwise known as “Curiosity.” The new rover will touch down … Continue reading
Artist's conception of flaring black hole GX 339-4
April 10, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Apr 11, 2012 Black hole theory contradicts itself. Most astrophysicists try to explain narrow jets erupting from various sources by using words like “nozzle” or “high pressure,” contradicting the known behavior of gases in a vacuum. For example, according to … Continue reading
The IC5146 interstellar cloud
April 9, 2012 by Mel Acheson
  April 10, 2012 Consensus astronomy proposes that thunder causes lightning. Infrared images of the “clouds” around the Cocoon Nebula reveal “networks of tangled gaseous filaments.” The filaments tend to have constant width and extend for many light-years. They appear … Continue reading
The Orion Nebula
April 8, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Apr 09, 2012 Million-degree plasma in the Orion Nebula comes not from the kinetic excitation of cold gas, but from the electric currents of space. For many years astrophysical theories of stellar and galactic development have been relegated to the … Continue reading
Christ on the Axis Mundi
April 5, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
Apr 06, 2012 A sky-high column of glowing plasma has influenced countless religious ideas. The mediaeval scholar-monk Johannes de Sacrobosco (c. 1195 – c. 1256) was a renowned computist – expert in the calculation of the correct date of Easter in … Continue reading
The Moon's north pole
April 4, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Apr 05, 2012 Lunar colonization awaits a benefit that exceeds the cost. A recent Picture of the Day article discussed the new GRAIL mission to the Moon. Two satellites will orbit the Moon together, with a range-finding system that will detect gravity … Continue reading
ESO's 3.6 meter telescope
April 3, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Apr 04, 2012 A European Southern Observatory study claims there are billions of rocky planets in the Milky Way. Human beings have wondered about other planets for centuries. “Are we alone?” is probably one of the earliest questions after “where … Continue reading
The Fornax Dwarf Galaxy orbits the Milky Way
April 2, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Apr 3, 2012 The Milky Way is connected to the rest of the Universe. According to a recent press release, astronomers have found “…evidence for the cosmic thread that connects us to the vast expanse of the Universe.” By examining … Continue reading
Evolution of an artist’s illustration into an inside-out star
April 1, 2012 by Mel Acheson
Apr 02, 2012 Is Cassiopeia A (Cas A) dying or just changing her fashion? Bio 1: In the beginning was an artist’s illustration of the consensus theory of stellar evolution. Thermonuclear fusion reactions at the center of the star transformed … Continue reading
Mount St Helens before and after the 1980 Isohypse Reconnection Event
March 31, 2012 by Bob Johnson
April 1, 2012 Recent research in volcanology has concentrated on improving the predictability of major eruption events with the primary aim of providing sufficient warning to enable evacuation of personnel from the danger zone. A breakthrough in understanding the underlying … Continue reading
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March 29, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 30, 2012 Astrophysicists are beginning to acknowledge the role that electricity plays in space. The Cassini-Huygens mission (now called Cassini-Equinox) was launched from Cape Canaveral on October 15, 1997. Its primary mission is the exploration of the Saturnian system, … Continue reading
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March 28, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 29, 2012 What drives star formation in various nebulae? Australian astronomer Colin Stanley Gum compiled an extensive catalog of nebulae before his death in 1960. A Study of Diffuse Southern H-alpha Nebulae comprises 85 images that reveal intense activity within a variety of … Continue reading
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March 27, 2012 by Stephen Smith
March 28, 2012 Are the bright crater rims and striations on Vesta the mark of discharge “vents”? Are asteroids and comets close cousins in the Solar System’s family? Comets are usually called “dirty snowballs” in the scientific press, although missions … Continue reading
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March 26, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 27, 2012 Could an ocean of liquid water exist on Europa? According to a recent press release, “Sending a submarine to the bottom of the ocean on Jupiter’s icy moon Europa is the most exciting potential mission in planetary … Continue reading
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March 25, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 26, 2012 A new mission to map the gravity field of the Moon. On September 10, 2011 NASA launched the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) satellites on a mission to the Moon. GRAIL-A and GRAIL-B are nearly identical … Continue reading
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March 22, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 23, 2012 Mercury reveals the violence of planetary genesis. Mercury’s story is probably a complicated tale of extremes. The planet’s surface is heavily scarred, with steep-walled canyons, scarps that rise up several kilometers, and craters that penetrate the crust … Continue reading
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March 21, 2012 by Stephen Smith
 Mar 22, 2012 The telescope that was once thought to be canceled has escaped mothballs and is on track for launch. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), formerly The Next Generation Telescope, is scheduled to be launched sometime in 2018. … Continue reading
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March 20, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 21, 2012 Heliophysicists acknowledge the role of plasma in solar eruptions but miss important aspects of its behavior. In Bengal to move at all Is seldom, if ever, done, But mad dogs and Englishmen Go out in the midday … Continue reading
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March 19, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 20, 2012 Vesta is confirming Electric Universe ideas about planetary scarring. Vesta appears to have experienced some powerful forces. Several craters more than 50 kilometers in diameter mar its surface. Near Vesta’s south pole is a particularly large example that is 460 kilometers … Continue reading
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March 18, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 19, 2012 The Dawn spacecraft will arrive at Ceres in August of 2015 Ceres is the largest asteroid in the Solar System. The most recent measurement from the Hubble Space Telescope puts it at approximately 975 kilometers in mean … Continue reading
'Nothing to see here. Move along!'
March 15, 2012 by Stephen J. Crothers
Mar 16, 2012 Schmidt et al. authored the paper Formation of the Black Hole in Nova Scorpii, The Astrophysical Journal, 567:491-502, 2002 March 1. Editor’s note: Many Picture of the Day articles have been written about the problems with so-called … Continue reading
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March 14, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 15, 2012 Dark mode plasma phenomena exist on the Sun. The image at the top of the page is the most detailed ever taken of the Sun’s chromosphere. The smallest features are 130 kilometers in size. Each spicule is … Continue reading
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March 13, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 14, 2012 Recent X-class solar flares have ignited the polar lights. An electrically active magnetotail (or plasma tail) extends for millions of kilometers from Earth. Charged particles from the Sun, otherwise known as the solar wind, together with ions … Continue reading
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March 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
  Mar 13, 2012 Elongated craters on the Moon are said to come from “grazing impactors.” In one of the earliest Pictures of the Day by the late Amy Acheson, the question was asked, how do you make a crater? … Continue reading
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March 11, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
  Mar 12, 2012 Ever since the gradualist doctrine natura non facit saltus cast an ossifying spell on the academic community, catastrophist theories of myth and other traditions have been anathema to the learned. Some envisioned events considerably more dramatic than an … Continue reading
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March 9, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
Mar 09, 2012 Ever since the gradualist doctrine natura non facit saltus cast an ossifying spell on the academic community, catastrophist theories of myth and other traditions have been anathema to the learned. Pre-Lyellians such as Thomas Burnet (c. 1635? … Continue reading
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March 8, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 08, 2012 The MESSENGER space probe is confirming the Electric Universe theory. MESSENGER entered orbit around Mercury on March 17, 2011 after traveling nearly eight billion kilometers. Since that time, it has sent hundreds of close-up images of the … Continue reading
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March 7, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
Mar 07, 2012 Even the lonely monuments left behind have a story to tell. Chavín de Huantar, in the Peruvian Andes, is one of many civilisations to have preceded the mighty Inca empire. The occupants of the ruins have no … Continue reading
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March 6, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 06, 2012 A star becomes a diamond? A recent press release announced the “discovery” of a planet in orbit around a pulsar that is thought to have once been a star, but is now a planetary body composed of … Continue reading
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March 5, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
Mar 05, 2012 Why are animals used so widely in coats of arms? The familiar red dragon of Wales and the double-headed eagle of the House of Habsburg exemplify a widespread and familiar practice to embed animal figures in heraldic … Continue reading
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March 1, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 02, 2012 What causes the rapid changes observed in Orion Nebula “protostars”? Using a combination of NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the ESA Herschel Space Observatory, astronomers found that so-called “young stars” are changing in brightness much faster than … Continue reading
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March 1, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Mar 01, 2012 The so-called “god particle” is most likely an illusion. The idea of a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was originally proposed early in the 1980s. Since the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) was at the end of its … Continue reading
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February 29, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 29, 2012 The Columbia River is a life-giving artery to the Pacific Northwest. Is it a recent addition to American geography? Many Picture of the Day articles discuss cosmic electrical forces that sculpted the face of the Earth in … Continue reading
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February 28, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 28, 2012 Solar flares can be thought of as giant lightning discharges. Conventional thinking suggests that the Sun accelerates charged particles into space in the same way that sound waves are amplified. Eruptions in the photosphere travel outward through … Continue reading
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February 27, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 27, 2012 Astronomers continue to cling to outmoded theories of star formation The European Space Agency (ESA) launched the Planck telescope platform on May 19, 2009 into an orbit around Lagrange point L2. Planck is designed to analyze the … Continue reading
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February 24, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 24, 2012 Where is the material that used to fill the Grand Canyon? In previous Picture of the Day articles, it was suggested that features on other planets and moons should be used to help explain what is found … Continue reading
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February 23, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 23, 2012 On August 24, 2006 the International Astronomical Union adopted fixed definitions for various objects in the Solar System. “Snow White,” otherwise known as 2007 OR10, is a dwarf planet about 13 billion kilometers from the Sun. Its … Continue reading
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February 21, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 22, 2012 Did tectonic and volcanic forces create the wide, parallel trenches on the Moon? The Moon has seen cataclysmic devastation at some time in its past. There are giant craters, wide and deep valleys, and multi-kilometer long rilles … Continue reading
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February 21, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 21, 2012 Can the surface of a tiny moon help to explain the mysterious geography of Mars? In an Electric Universe, the charged moons and the charged rings around Saturn are alternately repelling and attracting each other as they … Continue reading
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February 20, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 20, 2012 Strands of magnetically confined plasma can be seen throughout the cosmos. A rotating vortex of solar plasma was the topic of a recent press release. Does that phenomenon relate to other energetic vortices? Previous Picture of the … Continue reading
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February 17, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 17, 2012 In an Electric Universe, plasma structures in space exhibit similar morphology regardless of scale. From galaxy clusters to individual stars, spheres and filaments predominate. Spherical clusters of stars, otherwise known as globular clusters, are another example of … Continue reading
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February 16, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 16, 2012 Immense clouds of ionized plasma as large as galaxies have been seen in deep space. A recent press release from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) discusses a vast cloud of gas and dust originally discovered in 2000, … Continue reading
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February 15, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 15, 2012 Dark matter is in the news. “Plasma phenomena are scalable. Their electrical and physical properties remain the same, independent of the size of the plasma.” — Donald Scott, author of The Electric Sky Plasma in space usually … Continue reading
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February 13, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 14, 2012 Water is said to have carved many of the features on Mars. Scientists from the University of California reported in June 2007 that a “confirmation” for the Martian liquid ocean theory was found: “shorelines” extending for thousands … Continue reading
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February 10, 2012 by Peter Mungo Jupp
Feb 10, 2012 The Australian Bunurong tribe recorded the catastrophic formation of Melbourne’s Port Phillip Bay in their mythology. “Plenty long ago, you could walk dry foot from our side of the bay to Corio. Then, in a night of … Continue reading
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February 8, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
Feb 09, 2012 ‘Plasma mythology’ may be defined as the study of plasmas, specifically near-earth plasmas, in human traditions, such as mythology and proto-scientific records. If this is a discipline, one of its most notable pioneers must be the French … Continue reading
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February 8, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 08, 2012 Jupiter puts on a periodic light show. Several years ago, Picture of the Day articles discussed the so-called “volcanic” plumes erupting from Jupiter’s moon Io. It was argued that they are plasma discharges from the moon electrically … Continue reading
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February 7, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
  Feb 07, 2012 Where does the idea of constellations come from? And how do these arbitrary groups of stars relate to mythology? The argument shapes up nicely in the light of traditions that name specific constellations as mythical creatures … Continue reading
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February 6, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
  Feb 06, 2012 Where does the idea of constellations come from? And how do these arbitrary groups of stars relate to mythology? The early 20th century saw the ascendancy of a short-lived movement in scholarship called ‘Pan-Babylonianism’, soon bemoaned … Continue reading
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February 3, 2012 by Mel Acheson
Feb 03, 2012 Fourteen years ago, Halton Arp published Seeing Red. Chapter 6, “Clusters of Galaxies,” presented his finding that the clusters were low-luminosity high-redshift—and nearby—“star piles.” There was not then and there has not been since any discussion of … Continue reading
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February 2, 2012 by Rens van der Sluijs
Feb 02, 2012 History repeats itself – and that includes the history of science. Back in 1879, the very notion of ‘prehistoric cave art’ was unheard of. The famous Palaeolithic art galleries inside such caves as at Altamira, Trois Frères … Continue reading
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February 1, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Feb 1, 2012 An X-2 class solar flare recently missed a direct impact with Earth. Heliophysicists classify solar flares according to their brightness in X-ray wavelengths. C-class flares are the smallest on the scale, with X-ray measurements in the 10^-6 … Continue reading
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January 30, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 31, 2012 Some so-called “neutron star pulsars” are said to create nebulae as they spin. The standard model of stellar evolution proposes that pulsars are neutron stars rotating at incredible speed. For example, PSR J1748-2446ad, in the globular cluster … Continue reading
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January 30, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 30, 2012 The Sun is predicted to “hibernate” during its next cycle in 2020. A recent press release states that the Sun’s activity will slow to an unprecedented decline in the next ten years. The prediction is based on … Continue reading
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January 27, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 27, 2012 It is common knowledge that electric charge must flow in a circuit in order for a magnetic field to be created. On May 30, 1908, Nobel laureate Hannes Olof Gösta Alfvén was born in Norrköping, Sweden. His … Continue reading
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January 25, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 26, 2012 Water vapor in the gas giant’s clouds comes from a local source. According to a recent press release the European Space Agency’s Herschel space observatory has detected a torus of water vapor around Saturn. The newly discovered … Continue reading
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January 25, 2012 by Mel Acheson
Jan 25, 2012 El Gordo is so called because it is the biggest, brightest, and hottest pair of colliding galaxy clusters known to astronomers. Astronomers “know” that El Gordo is over 7 billion light-years from Earth. This knowledge derives from … Continue reading
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January 24, 2012 by Garry Maxfield
Jan 24, 2012 In the consensus view, all valleys are caused by water erosion and solitary peaks must be volcanoes. The various peaks in the Glasshouse Mountains are supposed to be remnants of volcanoes that erupted eons ago, although there … Continue reading
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January 23, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 23, 2012 Plasma instabilities are a better explanation for the Milky Way’s strangely distorted central ring. According to a recent press release, “…observations from the Herschel Space Observatory show a bizarre, twisted ring of dense gas at the center … Continue reading
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January 20, 2012 by Mel Acheson
Jan 20, 2012 A recent image of the Helix Nebula in the constellation Aquarius exposes more details of its electrical structure. The new infrared image shows radial Birkeland currents (called “strands” in the press release) crossing the concentric rings and … Continue reading
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January 19, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 19, 2012 Earth is said to emit heat energy because radioactive elements decay in its depths. Electrical activity might be a better explanation. “Do not wait to strike till the iron is hot; but make it hot by striking.” … Continue reading
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January 18, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 18, 2012 The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is providing more evidence for the Electric Universe theory. The Moon has intrigued humanity since the beginning. Where did it come from? What is it made of? Today, those questions remain unanswered, for … Continue reading
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January 17, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 17, 2012 A distant system of planets in proximity to one another challenges current theories. A recent press release from the Kepler Space Telescope research team announced the discovery of an “alien solar system” with six planets. That they … Continue reading
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January 16, 2012 by Peter Mungo Jupp
Jan 15, 2012 Is there a connection between Australia’s lunettes and Carolina’s oval bays? Scattered around the shoreline and erratically buried in the sand dune lunettes of Lake Victoria lay an estimated 15,000 aboriginal bodies of uncertain age. Archaeologist Colin … Continue reading
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January 13, 2012 by Mel Acheson
Jan 14, 2012 Balanced rock formations are common. But how to explain balanced water? At first thought, one would not expect water to run down the hip ridge of a hill. The gravitational condition is unstable equilibrium: any deviation from … Continue reading
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January 12, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 12, 2012 Does the acceleration of gravity alone create high frequency radiation? “Greatness is a zigzag streak of lightning in the brain.” — Herbert Asquith, Prime Minister of the UK, 1908-1916 Black holes are theoretically required because velocity and … Continue reading
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January 11, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 11, 2012 Galactic haloes are best explained using the Electric Universe theory. There are rings around planets, rings around stars, and there are rings around galactic nuclei, as demonstrated by the Hubble Space Telescope image of AM 0644-741. Although … Continue reading
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January 10, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 10, 2012 Stellar explosions might not be what has commonly been assumed. On January 6, 2003 the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base onboard the Coriolis satellite. SMEI … Continue reading
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January 8, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 09, 2012 What model best fits heliospheric behavior? “How now, wit! Whither wander you?” — William Shakespeare: As You Like it, Act 1, Scene 2 Space, it is said, is a vacuum. Since the best pumped vacuum on Earth … Continue reading
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January 6, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 06, 2012 From galaxies to the laboratory, transverse electric currents accompany a main discharge channel. That “main discharge channel” experienced by most people comes in the form of a terrestrial lighting bolt. Slow-motion studies reveal that each flash is … Continue reading
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January 5, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 05, 2012 Most nebulae exhibit the unmistakable characteristics of electrical activity. Previous Thunderbolts Picture of the Day articles have argued for an electrical interpretation of astrophysical observations, so that there is an alternative available for those who want extracurricular … Continue reading
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January 4, 2012 by Stephen Smith
Jan 04, 2012 Redshift theory inhibits new research into the age and size of the Universe. Two major points in Big Bang theory are that redshift is proportional to distance and that it also indicates velocity. It is assumed that … Continue reading
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January 3, 2012 by Mel Acheson
Jan 03, 2011 Mergers are out. Vanity is in: active galaxies are self-absorbed. For many years, the only acceptable explanation of high galactic x-ray output accompanied by high redshift was mergers of galaxies. The universe became a bumper-car arena where … Continue reading
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January 2, 2012 by Mel Acheson
Jan 02, 2012 If redshift (z) indicates distance, then astronomers have discovered the superlative object: the most distant, the most ancient, the most luminous, the most massive. Analysis of the object’s spectrum shows that its lines have shifted toward the … Continue reading

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