Still Seeing Red

Original Post February 3, 2012 Fourteen years ago, Halton Arp published Seeing Red. Chapter 6, “Clusters of Galaxies,” presented his finding that the clusters were low-luminosity high-redshift—and nearby—“star piles.” There was not then and there has not been since any discussion of the difficulties for consensus theories that Arp’s observations…

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Astronomical Fashion Flips

Active galaxies (red crosses)

Original Post January 3, 2012 Mergers are out. Vanity is in: active galaxies are self-absorbed. For many years, the only acceptable explanation of high galactic x-ray output accompanied by high redshift was mergers of galaxies. The universe became a bumper-car arena where every presumed high-energy event was proof of a…

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What Science Says

December 18, 2020 It’s common to hear people refer to “what science says.” The usual assumption is that “what science says” is said indefeasibly. But the term ‘science’ has two conflicting senses: science as currently-accepted theory (CAT) and science as method. To conclude that method inevitably leads to CAT and,…

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Gravity and Plasma

September 21, 2020 Kuhn’s 1962 essay (The Structure of Scientific Revolutions) exploring the nature of changes in scientific theories, and a plethora of commentaries since, have made it out to be a Big Deal and to be also somewhat mysterious: “revolution”, “incommensurability of paradigms”, “new world”, etc. It seems to…

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Jumping For Joy

April 15, 2020 Halton Christian “Chip” Arp (March 21, 1927 – December 28, 2013) When our son was 2 and 3 and 4, he liked to climb up on high objects-the table, the refrigerator, the roof-and jump into our arms. When we weren’t available to “play catch”, he would climb…

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