Mars - Craters

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: APOD 8 MAY 2011 Shadow in Endurance Crater

Unread postby Sparky » Sat May 14, 2011 10:01 am

Goldminer wrote:
Sparky wrote: Can someone please tell me how to mask the url? thanks...


I'll try: Click on the "maskurl button. You get this (minus the space b'tween Mask and url:" [mask url=][/mask url]

Now, retreive the url you wish to mask and copy it after the = sign in the first set of brackets. Next; type the word/s you wish to use mask the url between the two bracketed code modules, such as "Here" or "This site."

So your product would look something like this: [mask url=http://www.einsteinwrong.com/main/] see this site[/mask url]

see this site

Aren't these HTML codes fun?


.



Thanks
It worked!

.....
Joe, as i said, many things look strange or unusual to the consensus cult...Their beliefs distort their perceptions and reasoning.
"It is dangerous to be right in matters where established men are wrong."
"Doubt is not an agreeable condition, but certainty is an absurd one."
"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire
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dendritic forms on edge of Mars crater

Unread postby bdw000 » Sun Dec 14, 2014 8:35 pm

I do not remember seeing this on a TPOD before: if this is old, sorry. I searched for "melas" and got no results (I assume from the web address this is Melas Chasma).

http://www.esa.int/var/esa/storage/images/esa_multimedia/images/2010/10/melas_chasma_on_mars/9748907-3-eng-GB/Melas_Chasma_on_Mars.jpg

Be sure to click on the image to magnify it: and look at the lower edge of the large crater. I do not remember seeing such "three-dimensional" dendritic formations on the edge of a crater (or "scooped out area") like that.

Here's another one:

http://www.esa.int/var/esa/storage/images/esa_multimedia/images/2007/11/noctis_labyrinthus/9708977-3-eng-GB/Noctis_Labyrinthus.jpg
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Re: dendritic forms on edge of Mars crater

Unread postby Steve Smith » Wed Dec 17, 2014 7:09 am

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volcano vs. impact on Mars

Unread postby bdw000 » Mon May 25, 2015 5:03 am

From the ESA:

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Impact_crater_or_supervolcano_caldera

Remind me again: what is the EU view of craters that have no raised rim around them? Does this have to do with anode vs. cathode?
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Re: volcano vs. impact on Mars

Unread postby Bomb20 » Thu May 28, 2015 10:08 am

As a matter of fact it is known that electric discharge machining can create craters without a clearly raised rim. I think more material is vapoprized instead of pressured to the side in these cases but I assume a more knowledgeable person here has a better explanation.

I conclude from this and the following picture that three discharges occured.
http://www.raumfahrer.net/news/images/siloe_patera_mars_perspektive_01_big.jpg

The first discharge was the biggest and created the outer rims. Then a second discharge came along the same ionization path and created a second crater within the first. Finally a third discharge hit the rim of the first, original crater.
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Re: volcano vs. impact on Mars

Unread postby FS3 » Thu May 28, 2015 7:56 pm

Bomb20 wrote:As a matter of fact it is known that electric discharge machining can create craters without a clearly raised rim. I think more material is vapoprized instead of pressured to the side in these cases but I assume a more knowledgeable person here has a better explanation.

I conclude from this and the following picture that three discharges occured.
http://www.raumfahrer.net/news/images/siloe_patera_mars_perspektive_01_big.jpg

The first discharge was the biggest and created the outer rims. Then a second discharge came along the same ionization path and created a second crater within the first. Finally a third discharge hit the rim of the first, original crater.


Same, as at Olympus Mons - see:
https://farsight3.wordpress.com/2015/05 ... rs-formte/

Marsian surface acting as anode in this case building up an huge mount here as well! The floor of the crater is way lower than the surrounding terrain...
Image
Siloe Patera topography (red=high, blue=low)

The case of the Valles Marineris shows that there was a close encounter of another celestial body. That's why the electrically induced scar is along the equator as it would be expected...

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Glassified craters on Mars

Unread postby paladin17 » Mon Jun 08, 2015 11:17 pm

http://geology.gsapubs.org/content/earl ... 1.abstract
http://phys.org/news/2015-06-martian-gl ... -life.html

Quenched glass formed by hypervelocity impacts can encapsulate and preserve biosignatures on Earth, demonstrating the fossilization potential of glass-rich impactites on Mars. However, definitive spectral signatures of impact glass have not been identified on the martian surface from orbital remote sensing. Here we present a remote compositional survey of probable impactites in well-preserved craters, using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars. These units are composed of mafic glasses mixed with crystalline phases including olivine and pyroxene, determined by radiative transfer Hapke modeling followed by spectral mixture analysis. This glassy material likely formed from impactinduced melting of the target rock with rapid quenching and minor subsequent devitrification or chemical alteration. The metastable glass has been preserved by the cold and dry martian climate during the Amazonian period, and this preservation—as confirmed here across the planet—provides a means to trap signs of ancient life on the accessible martian surface. Our results lend concrete support to theoretical arguments suggesting that impact glass has formed in abundance on Mars, both inside of craters and as spherules in distal strewnfields. Contrary to previous ideas, martian impact products are not destroyed by interaction with volatiles during the impact process.


Of course they're talking impacts here. But might that be the EDM-type glassified polish that was proposed for Titan's "seas", for example? If the craters on Mars, as well as "seas" on Titan were created via discharge mechanism.
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Re: Glassified craters on Mars

Unread postby Bomb20 » Thu Jun 11, 2015 8:10 am

Very intersting topic and no reply. I wonder.

Anyway. We have a number of well-known glassified surfaces and glass spherules on Earth, e.g. in Africa (Sahara, especially Libya/Egypt), USA (New Mexico), Australia (Edeowie Glass), India (Mhenjo Daro), Central Asia (Taklamakan desert in China).

However, we have many interpretations as well: Impact glass, glass made by meteoric explosions (without impact!), glass mad by hydro vulcanic eruptions, glass made by atomic explosions, glass made by lightning plus volcanic ash and finally cosmic thunderbolts creating glassified surfaces.

This is a link refering to glass spherules (Lightning Plus Volcanic Ash Makes Glass): http://www.geosociety.org/news/pr/2015/15-15.htm

Here another refering to the lightning strike origins of the Edeowie glass:
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2004/pdf/1406.pdf

So, if already common lightning around volcanoes can create glass then I think it is misleading to attribute glassification in a crater immediately to impacts without any closer research.
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Re: Glassified craters on Mars

Unread postby Steve Smith » Thu Jun 11, 2015 9:01 am

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Re: Glassified craters on Mars

Unread postby seasmith » Thu Jun 11, 2015 10:25 am

~

German geologist debunking the "impact origin of desert glass",
with much imagery and detail:
Partly digested mineral phases in the glass, the presence of high-temperature minerals of Quartz, as well as Baddeleyite, a high-temperature breakdown product of Zircon and other minerals (e.g. hexagonal Diamond with four phases of Graphite polymorphs) are entries from a basaltic plume. It had their root in the basaltic magma concentration in about 400 - 700 km depth with temperatures of about 1800°C. .

http://www.b14643.de/Sahara/LDG/index.htm


Kebira
http://www.b14643.de/Sahara/Crater_Kebira/index.htm

smelting sandstone from below, or above ?
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Glass on Mars

Unread postby bdw000 » Sun Jun 14, 2015 7:44 pm

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Re: Glass on Mars

Unread postby Steve Smith » Mon Jun 15, 2015 7:47 am

It's good to see findings that confirm ideas. We've been talking abut glassified formations on Mars for many years:

Victoria's Other Secrets

Minerals on Mars

Nuclear War God
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Re: Mars - Craters

Unread postby comingfrom » Wed Jan 06, 2016 1:55 am

Another awesome thread. Thanks to all you Thunderbolters. :D

With regards to the Solar system's largest crater discussed in the beginning of this thread. Some later links took me the Google mars, which has an elevation feature, so I zoomed out and caught a screenshot of the whole of the planet. This to show 'the largest crater', or excavated northern hemisphere. Blue is the deeper areas, "sea level" is where green meets yellow, and going through orange and red is the highest elevation regions.

Image

Now take a pause to look for a while, and notice how Valles Marinerus is connected to, and excavated to the same depth as, the northern hemisphere "crater". Something which struck me, I thought worth pointing out. Surely not just a coincidence.

~~~
While following the many wonderful links, I made a discovery in Melas Chasma.

Cut from the image, and blown up.

Image

I can't really judge how tall it is, but judging by the shadow length, it is as tall as the big cliffs elsewhere in the image. Then another link had this image.

Image

Those tall thin mesas might be what that thing is on Mars. The only thing is, it is the only one.

~~~
I also came across this awesome image of a bullseye crater, via a Google image search.

Image

I followed the image to the article, and had a good laugh.

An oddly shaped crater on the mid latitudes of the Martian northern hemisphere likely obtained its terraced profile from a surprisingly large subsurface ice deposit -- estimated at the combined size of California and Texas and about 130 feet thick, according to researchers at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory.


I had a cry too. :x Besides failing to explain how subsurface ice effects crater formation, they failed to name the crater, only referring to it as "the terraced crater and others like it in the region".

At least they mention the region's name, Arcadia Planitia.

~Paul
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Re: Mars - Craters

Unread postby allynh » Thu Jun 08, 2017 9:54 am

This is an interesting picture from Mars, on many levels.
PIA21636_hires.jpg

Hi-res version
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/file ... a21636.jpg

This is not about the obvious big hole that was clearly dug by EDM. Look at the hi-res version and notice the strings of tracks in the carbon dioxide snow. Here on Earth, when you see tracks like that they are from birds or animals walking in the snow.

- These tracks are also examples of EDM cutting paths along the ground.

When this happens on the regular dirt, you might see scorch marks. By having it in the carbon dioxide snow you can see the tracks clearly.

Look at the hi-res picture and see all of the tracks, and then look at the "melted" holes in the carbon dioxide snow. How they are clearly examples of EDM as well. This shows the blatant EDM that occurs all over Mars.

NASA Can't Explain What Made This Strange, Deep Hole on Mars
http://www.sciencealert.com/nasa-doesn- ... le-on-mars
We're not saying it's aliens...

You'd think NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has seen everything there is to see on the Martian surface in the 11 years it's orbited our nearest neighbour, but a snapshot taken over the planet's South Pole has revealed something we can't explain.

While the planet's entire surface is pocked with various depressions and craters, a vast pit spotted among the "Swiss cheese terrain" of melting frozen carbon dioxide appears to be a bit deeper than your average hole, leaving astronomers to try and figure out what made it.

A lot of things can make holes in Mars' rocky terrain: more than half a million meteorite impacts have left craters; collapsing lava tubes have created deep pits; ancient floods have gouged out giant chasms; and volcanic activity has melted ice to leave funnels.

Occasionally the MRO will come across an odd feature that poses a fun mystery to solve, such as this shallow, circular depression seen earlier this year.

But there's nothing so shallow about this newly discovered pit. Just take a look at it:

PIA21636 hiresNASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Being summer for Mars' South Pole, the Sun is low enough in the sky to accentuate shadows over the landscape, making subtle features pop right out. Yet there a glint of light is still able to reveal ice at the bottom of the hole.

Surrounding the pit are patches frozen carbon dioxide. The circles in the ice is thought to where the dry ice has sublimated into gas in the summer sunshine, leaving what astronomers call "Swiss Cheese terrain".

The image was taken using the MRO's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, or HiRISE camera, which allows researchers to see objects on Mars that are larger than one metre (about 3 feet) in size from about 200 to 400 kilometres (about 125 to 250 miles) above.

That means the pit isn't tiny – at 50 centimetres (19.7 inches) per pixel, we're looking at a feature hundreds of metres across. Take a look on NASA's website for a hi-res version of the image.

So the question is, did something punch its way through, or is it a collapse of some sort?

Without more information, it's hard to tell, but no doubt NASA will be discussing all of the possibilities.

The MRO has been in Martian orbit since March, 2006, sending back detailed images of the Red Planet's surface that reveal a dynamic environment where dust devils roam, sand dunes crawl, and occasional bits of Earthling tech are left to gather dust.

After completing all of its primary goals in the first two years, and two mission extensions, the orbiter is still going strong – we'll almost certainly be seeing more odd holes like this in the future.
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