Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby dahlenaz » Sat Jul 06, 2013 2:53 pm

viscount aero wrote:
dahlenaz wrote:
viscount aero wrote:
Beata-at-home wrote:viscount aero,
If you don't mind, please explain your answer. ("Highly unlikely.")

I think they are hiding the evidence, that is why they "can't find" any pieces. Also, why would the Syrian video be banned from Youtube?


They have been finding pieces. And do you mean the meteor was a missile, or it was shot down by a missile? Regardless, I find the missile theory highly far-fetched at best.

The below video from Texas of a fireball shows nearly the same vapor and flash profile as the Chelyabinsk meteor:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_YAQG0_IIM

Although the event is shorter as the object is smaller and enters at a sharper angle, you can see the same entry pattern with the 3 major points of interest: it descends, brightens, flares up (#1), dims, flares up again (#2)--leaving a fat bulging first part, a pinched area of dimming, then the #2 portion with the remaining bolide (#3) emerging and glowing dimmer compared to the residual plasma trail structure.

Was this shot down, too? I don't think so.


The pinch area that you speak of is very possibly only a lens anomoly and i've obtained a photo
to shows how a digital camera (very similar to the dash cam) reacts to overly bright areas before it
makes its electronic adjustment. The image below is from a video taken as the camera rotated toward
the sun while keeping the ground as a significant part of the photo.. The bright cone didn't diminish
until the sun was the domonant subject for the CCD to adjust to, then a large round area was captured.

http://para-az.com/chelyabinsk-meteor/lens-anom-s50.jpg

larger image:
http://para-az.com/chelyabinsk-meteor/lens-anom.jpg

d...z

...

I don't quite follow when you mention the "pinched" area in reference to my description. The pinched area is a dimmed area, not a flared area (where the CCD in the camera was overwhelmed). If I have misunderstood you then accept my apologies.


Can you provide a picture with some lines to show what you are describing? d...z

...
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby viscount aero » Sat Jul 06, 2013 3:02 pm

Please go here to view [click the thumbnails]:
http://www.stage32.com/profile/75224/ph ... 8048537185
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby dahlenaz » Sun Jul 07, 2013 2:21 pm

viscount aero wrote:Please go here to view [click the thumbnails]:
http://www.stage32.com/profile/75224/ph ... 8048537185


The only mention of pinches in those photos was in reference to the twin vapor trail.

This is something entirely different than what i though had been suggested as evidence
of a discharge to the ground and a pinch that revealed that aspect...

I don't remember who posted that notion,, maybe someone can chime in to clarify. d...z
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby viscount aero » Sun Jul 07, 2013 4:29 pm

To clarify further in case it is necessary, I didn't mean pinch as in z-pinch--but as in "not fat." There are fat regions of the vapor trail and thin regions. I called the thin regions "pinched."
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby seasmith » Fri Aug 16, 2013 6:26 pm

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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby justcurious » Fri Sep 06, 2013 5:42 am



Thanks for updating this thread with that news. Very impressive. I never imagined such a small thing can cause so much dust that it creates a dust belt around the planet. It seems so Velikovskian.
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby GaryN » Fri Sep 06, 2013 11:56 am

Chelyabinsk meteorite had previous collision or near miss

"The meteorite which landed near Chelyabinsk is a type known as an LL5 chondrite and it's fairly common for these to have undergone a melting process before they fall to Earth," says Dr Victor Sharygin from IGM, who is presenting the research at the Goldschmidt conference. "This almost certainly means that there was a collision between the Chelyabinsk meteorite and another body in the solar system or a near miss with the Sun."
Based on their colour and structure, the IGM researchers have divided the meteorite fragments into three types: light, dark and intermediate. The lighter fragments are the most commonly found, but the dark fragments are found in increasing numbers along the meteorite's trajectory, with the greatest number found close to where it hit the Earth.


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-08-meteor-russia-sun.html#jCp

The characteristics of the fragments could also be explained by electrical effects, the change in colour along the trajectory maybe confirming such. Heating and then EMP shock metamorphosis, and lastly shattering by the final discharge to ground. No previous collisions or having gotten too close to the Sun required.
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby viscount aero » Fri Sep 06, 2013 12:14 pm

GaryN wrote:Chelyabinsk meteorite had previous collision or near miss

"The meteorite which landed near Chelyabinsk is a type known as an LL5 chondrite and it's fairly common for these to have undergone a melting process before they fall to Earth," says Dr Victor Sharygin from IGM, who is presenting the research at the Goldschmidt conference. "This almost certainly means that there was a collision between the Chelyabinsk meteorite and another body in the solar system or a near miss with the Sun."
Based on their colour and structure, the IGM researchers have divided the meteorite fragments into three types: light, dark and intermediate. The lighter fragments are the most commonly found, but the dark fragments are found in increasing numbers along the meteorite's trajectory, with the greatest number found close to where it hit the Earth.


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-08-meteor-russia-sun.html#jCp

The characteristics of the fragments could also be explained by electrical effects, the change in colour along the trajectory maybe confirming such. Heating and then EMP shock metamorphosis, and lastly shattering by the final discharge to ground. No previous collisions or having gotten too close to the Sun required.


It is typical of the mainstream to cite collisions as common causal agents for events (even though the vastness of space would appear to prevent collisions between very small bodies). If something is unexplainable, add a collision or near-collision to the discussion and the issue becomes magically resolved! They're almost certainly certain of it!
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby Sparky » Tue Sep 10, 2013 5:57 pm

http://redicecreations.com/article.php?id=26823

A date stone-shaped fragment of the famous Chelyabinsk meteorite weighting several hundred kilograms was located on the bed of a lake in the Urals. Divers are planning to start recovery of the celestial object later this week.
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby GaryN » Wed Sep 11, 2013 10:23 am

The observed effects of a 600 Kg, presumably red hot piece of rock, travelling at perhaps close to 1000 km/h, do not seem to tally with what I would imagine would have happened. Maybe my mental image is totally wrong, but I wouldn't be surprised if what they pull out of the lake might not be what they expect to find. Could be very interesting indeed.
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby viscount aero » Sat Sep 21, 2013 9:52 pm

Fireball over northern Italy - September 03, 2013

A bright fireball has been seen over northern Italy aroud 02:12 local time (00:12 UT) of September 03, 2013. Some witnesses in the Veneto region have reported hearing sounds (such as explosions) after the passage of the fireball.

Watch the entry and flare up profile of this fireball as it follows a similar pattern of bursts as the Chelybinsk event:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIaz1dfMvXc
http://remanzacco.blogspot.com/
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby CharlesChandler » Sun Sep 22, 2013 2:09 am

Here's another fireball, this time over Cusco, Peru, 2011-08-25, that is close enough to see details of the tail, and which is also symmetrically bipolar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRtucs6D0KA
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby kiwi » Wed Sep 25, 2013 4:02 am

GaryN wrote:The observed effects of a 600 Kg, presumably red hot piece of rock, travelling at perhaps close to 1000 km/h, do not seem to tally with what I would imagine would have happened.



Im with you Gary at 600kg :D .... visually the "hole" was dissapointing wasnt it? .The statement below may be a typo of sorts I guess, Pretty poor translations are not uncommon Ive noticed in general from non-english sources, ..


According to scientists, the huge chunk, weighting hundreds of metric tons, is buried under a 2.5-meter (8.2-foot) layer of silt. Scientists expect to remove the silt around it on Wednesday evening.

http://en.ria.ru/russia/20130925/183707 ... -Soon.html



And ran across this also, same region, but different lake ... nasty :(

LBL Scientists Lead First Russian-American Field Test in Chelyabinsk Nuclear Waste Site

September 21, 1994

Mike Wooldridge, MAWooldridge@lbl.gov
BERKELEY--Earth scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) have embarked on the first-ever joint Russian-American field test of a nuclear waste site in the former Soviet Union.

The team is contributing expertise and equipment to a collaborative study of an area in Chelyabinsk, Russia. Lakes and rivers around Chelyabinsk have been a dumping ground for radioactive waste since the mid-1940s.

"The area is the most radioactively contaminated site in the world," said Chin-Fu Tsang, head of the Russian-American Center for Contaminant Transport Studies in LBL's Earth Sciences Division.

Joining Tsang on the trip are LBL researchers Harold Wollenberg and Ray Solbau, University of California at Berkeley graduate student William Frangos, Karen Stevenson of the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Measurement Laboratory and Michael Foley of Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Over 10 days, the team will measure the spread of chemicals from Chelyabinsk's Lake Karachai, which alone contains 120 million curies of radioactive waste. In comparison, the Chernobyl accident in 1986 released 150 million curies of radiation.
http://www.lbl.gov/Science-Articles/Arc ... waste.html


Chelyabinsk's Lake Karachai ... :arrow: http://goo.gl/maps/aQleI

Chebarkul Lake Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russia ... :arrow: http://goo.gl/maps/RhUlw
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby CharlesChandler » Wed Sep 25, 2013 5:20 am

According to scientists, the huge chunk, weighting hundreds of metric tons, is buried under a 2.5-meter (8.2-foot) layer of silt.

Ummm, how did the "meteorite" get buried under 2.5 meters of silt?

And I agree with Gary about the hole in the ice. The high-velocity impact of a meteorite "weighing several hundreds of metric tons" would have created waves that would have fractured the ice across the entire lake.

This sounds like a science funding scam to me.
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby GaryN » Wed Sep 25, 2013 10:03 am

Today is the day they are supposed to be trying to remove the fragment, so there should be some news soon.
It doesn't seem like they are concerned about the radiation, and from what I have been able to determine, the river beds around there have about 3 times background radiation, so still nowhere near as much as natural background in many places around the world where many people live without ill effects. And just of a matter of interest perhaps, the French company Arevea that reprocesses nuclear fuel has trials under way of a supposedly very successful cancer cure that uses a lead isotope (212Pb) they isolated from spent nuclear fuel rods.
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