Electric Weather (cont.)

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.
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JP Michael
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Electric Weather (cont.)

Unread post by JP Michael » Wed Feb 12, 2020 2:12 am

This thread is continued from here.

I wanted to reintroduce this discussion because the radical weather Australia has been experiencing of late has had me frequently visiting the Australian Bureau of Meterology site in addition to the global current mapping site, https://earth.nullschool.net/

I have noticed that surface updraft currents occur in what meterology calls "high pressure" regions, and surface downdrafts occur in "low pressure" regions. These are easily noticed especially when cyclone/hurricane events are present.

I am also noticing some of Andy Hall's fractal patterning at surface and higher altitudes: 'crab claws', 'foot prints' and other telltale signs of ionic wind fractals.

I am also noticing significant day-night cycles, especially with the sudden emanation of surface 'mushrooms' (I do not know what else to call them!) during evening cycles in the Australian central regions.

I will post images later as I have run out of time today.

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paladin17
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Re: Electric Weather (cont.)

Unread post by paladin17 » Wed Feb 12, 2020 12:54 pm

JP Michael wrote:
Wed Feb 12, 2020 2:12 am
I have noticed that surface updraft currents occur in what meterology calls "high pressure" regions, and surface downdrafts occur in "low pressure" regions. These are easily noticed especially when cyclone/hurricane events are present.
But this is exactly the reverse of what is observed: downward current (both in electrical sense and in the sense of motion of air masses) corresponds to high pressure, and upward current - to low pressure.

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JP Michael
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Re: Electric Weather (cont.)

Unread post by JP Michael » Wed Feb 12, 2020 9:06 pm

Why does meterology call them "highs" and "lows" then?

My comments were based on what the Bureau marks on their own weather maps. I will post examples tomorrow as i do not have time today.

crawler
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Re: Electric Weather (cont.)

Unread post by crawler » Wed Feb 12, 2020 9:46 pm

Gerald Pollack talks of electric weather (updrafts etc, day-night stuff, charge stuff), & some of his stuff might apply here.

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paladin17
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Re: Electric Weather (cont.)

Unread post by paladin17 » Thu Feb 13, 2020 10:34 am

JP Michael wrote:
Wed Feb 12, 2020 9:06 pm
Why does meterology call them "highs" and "lows" then?

My comments were based on what the Bureau marks on their own weather maps. I will post examples tomorrow as i do not have time today.
"High" and "low" refers to pressure.
High pressure = anticyclone = downward motion of air masses + clockwise rotation in Northern hemisphere. Low pressure = cyclone (including strong cyclones - hurricanes etc.) = upward motion of air masses + counter-clockwise rotation in Northern hemisphere.
In the Southern hemisphere the rotation is reversed.

At the same time in lows the electric current (defined as the motion of positive charges, as usual) is moving upwards, charging the positive ionosphere, and in highs it's moving downwards, discharging it (so-called "fair weather return current"). As you can see, the current direction is correlated with the direction of motion of air masses, which is indeed what is observed (Burns' effect).

There are some hypotheses of how it can be governed electrically - e.g. see my talks at OTF2017 ("Turning the Magnetic Key") and OTF2018 ("Atmospheric structures in the Global Electric Circuit") conferences. Though so far they are exactly that - only hypotheses.

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JP Michael
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Re: Electric Weather (cont.)

Unread post by JP Michael » Fri Feb 14, 2020 12:45 am

Thanks Eugene @paladin17.

These are the kinds of things I'm comparing:

Figure 1. Meterological Weather Map (courteousy of bom.gov.au)
Image

Figure 2. Surface Wind Current Map (courteousy of earth.nullschool.net; 11:00 AEST on 14/02/2020)
Image

The yellow arrows represent wind current associated with "low" pressure regions. Of especial interest is ex-Tropical Cyclone Uesi, off the east coast of Australia, and two smaller systems in the Indian ocean far off the west coast.

The red arrows represent wind current associated with "high" pressure regions. There are two notable systems of this kind in the example, one south of New Zealand and a second south of Western Australia.

Blue lines represent surface troughs (I think?).

Orange lines represent areas winds are repelled from (I do not know the meteorological term for this).

I am still trying to incorporate "shear zones", but that will have to wait for an increase in my understanding of meteorology and ionic wind patterning.

For comparison, I will increase the altitude from surface to 850, 700 and 500 hPa just so it is evident that these updraft-downdraft regions extend well beyond the surface:

Figure 3. 850 hPa
Image

Figure 4. 700 hPa
Image

Figure 5. 500 hPa
Image

I still do not know what to make of all of this and how atmospheric electric current directions (proton and electron movement) is to be factored into wind direction and high-low pressure regions and their interactions, not just horizontally but also vertically.

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JP Michael
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Re: Electric Weather (cont.)

Unread post by JP Michael » Fri Feb 14, 2020 1:34 am

@paladin17

They say the Coriolis effect is what causes the flow of particles from pole to equator, but what if it is fractal magnetism, that is, the particles are attempting to follow the Earth's magnetic fields but, the earth being a sphere, the particles are forced to flow according to surface topography and interactions with other particles in the atmosphere?

Figure 1. Digital Representation of Fractal Magnetic Field Lines (courteousy of Ken Wheeler).
Image
Each hemiphere of the diagram above should be considered 3D and toroidal, with a cone that funnels material back into the poles. Ejection at equator, funnelling at the poles in an eternal loop.

Simply overlay the earth as a sphere on that fractal representation, with the earth's core at the centre, and you have the essence of magnetic flow directions applied to the atmospheric surface of a sphere. Moreover, the intersection of the sphere and the fields would correspond exactly to where the auroras form at north and south poles respectively.

Ironically, this magnetic field pattern is incredibly similar to that developed by David LaPoint.

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