Question about the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

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folaht
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Question about the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

Unread post by folaht » Mon Oct 18, 2021 4:42 am

Why is this diagram in a visible rainbow pattern?

https://stargazerslounge.com/uploads/mo ... 481359.jpg

Has anyone realized there might be stars outside of it? Has the thunderbolts forum?

I'm asking this for HDE 226868–Cygnus X-1, which is a binary star system, consisting of one blue supergiant variable star designated HDE 226868 and another object thought to be a black hole named Cygnus X-1. Cygnus X-1 is visible in X-ray.
Last edited by nick c on Tue Oct 26, 2021 11:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: spelling correction in the thread title
Since 1 % 1, 1 * 1 and 1 - 1 do not add up, we must conclude that 1 + 1 is 3.

BeAChooser
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Re: Question about the Hertzsprung-russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

Unread post by BeAChooser » Mon Oct 18, 2021 5:56 pm

EU folks don’t just plot luminosity versus temperature.

They also consider the possibility that luminosity versus current is more significant:

http://www.holoscience.com/wp/wp-conten ... iagram.jpg

And I’m not sure why you think binary stars like HDE 226868–Cygnus X-1 aren’t on either.

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GaryN
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Re: Question about the Hertzsprung-russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

Unread post by GaryN » Mon Oct 18, 2021 6:42 pm

The contrarian view is that the HR diagram is complete nonsense and is based on the assumption that what they are detecting with the instruments that nobody really understands are in fact stars at all. There is actually no proof that even the nearest supposed star to us is a star, never mind all the objects they believe are much further away. The Emperor really has no clothes if you look carefully enough at the science involved.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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nick c
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Re: Question about the Hertzsprung-russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

Unread post by nick c » Mon Oct 18, 2021 11:16 pm

Gary,
Please stay on topic. This is the Electric Universe board.

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nick c
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Re: Question about the Hertzsprung-russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

Unread post by nick c » Mon Oct 18, 2021 11:57 pm

Donald Scott discusses what the H-R diagram signifies from the EU perspective:
https://www.electric-cosmos.org/hrdiagr.html

folaht
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Re: Question about the Hertzsprung-russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

Unread post by folaht » Tue Oct 19, 2021 5:25 am

That H-R diagram looks interesting.
It signifies that it's incomplete on both sides.

Shouldn't the thunderbolts forum create a larger diagram?
Since 1 % 1, 1 * 1 and 1 - 1 do not add up, we must conclude that 1 + 1 is 3.

folaht
Posts: 81
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:38 pm

Re: Question about the Hertzsprung-russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

Unread post by folaht » Tue Oct 19, 2021 12:39 pm

That H-R diagram looks interesting.
In case people miss which one I'm talking about, it's this one:
https://www.electric-cosmos.org/hr3.jpg

That piece of diagram should indicate that infrared stars are also possible.
Wasn't Jupiter sending out more radiation than receiving it?

Anyway, on the other side we thus should have Cygnus X-1 (and maybe neutron stars?).

I propose that someone at this forum should create an HR diagram expanded on both sides.
Since 1 % 1, 1 * 1 and 1 - 1 do not add up, we must conclude that 1 + 1 is 3.

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nick c
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Re: Question about the Hertzsprung-russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

Unread post by nick c » Tue Oct 19, 2021 3:15 pm

folaht wrote:That piece of diagram should indicate that infrared stars are also possible.
Wasn't Jupiter sending out more radiation than receiving it?
The diagram is fine. Remember that in the Electric Universe the distinction between gas giant planets and brown dwarf stars is imprecise, in that it depends upon the ambient electrical environment, rather than the celestial body itself. In this solar system, the Sun is usurping most of the power supply, that is...the galactic current.
So Jupiter is presently a gas giant planet. The diagram is one that charts stars. The distinction is mostly one of semantics. If Jupiter were traveling alone through interstellar space it would be a very dim brown dwarf star and would have a place in the lower right corner of the linked chart. To extend the chart to include gas giant planets would be okay, but that would be an effort to expand a "star" chart into a "star and gas giant planet" chart. Of course, you could do that if you wish.

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With regard to neutron stars/pulsars, in the Electric Universe they are something totally different than what is taught by consensus science.
The hypothesized exotic material, neutronium, is a physical impossibility due to the "zone of stability." Neutrons cannot exist outside of an atomic nucleus because they deteriorate into a proton and electron in a matter of seconds. There is no evidence that there can be conditions which allow an exception. Neutron stars exist as a desperate attempt by mainstream to explain observations within the context of the failing gravity only paradigm.

There is a simpler electric explanation: From the link in my post above, Scott wrote:
Some pulsars oscillate with periods in the millisecond range. Their radio pulse characteristics are: the 'duty cycle' is typically 5% (i.e., the pulsar flashes like a strobe light - the duration of each output pulse is much shorter than the length of time between pulses); some individual pulses are quite variable in intensity; the polarization of the pulse implies the origin has a strong magnetic field; magnetic fields require electrical currents. These characteristics are consistent with an electrical arc (lightning) interaction between two closely spaced binary stars. Relaxation oscillators with characteristics like this have been known and used by electrical engineers for many years. Therefore, I was pleased when I saw the following announcement:

Hubble Space Telescope Observations Reveal Coolest and Oldest White Dwarf Stars in the Galaxy: "Using the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have detected five optical companion stars orbiting millisecond pulsars. Only two other such systems are known. Three of the companions are among the coolest and oldest white dwarf stars known."
Last edited by nick c on Wed Oct 20, 2021 10:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: link added


folaht
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Re: Question about the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. (Cygnus X-1)

Unread post by folaht » Tue Nov 16, 2021 3:27 pm

On wikipedia:
The compact object is now estimated to have a mass about 21.2 times the mass of the Sun[6][7] and has been shown to be too small to be any known kind of normal star, or other likely object besides a black hole.[17] If so, the radius of its event horizon has 300 km "as upper bound to the linear dimension of the source region" of occasional X-ray bursts lasting only for about 1 ms.[18]
I'll bet that source 17, which you need to go to buy it or go to a library for, won't give any satisfying answer of it's radius and will simply infer it's size from the X-ray measurements.
The TPoD also does not guess what the radius of Cygnus X-1 should be.

If we're looking at the HR diagram it most likely is either 0.01 or 10 times the solar radius, with the 10 times solar radius being the more likely one.

Suppose it's radius is or 1000% or 1% of that of the sun, what are the chances that Cygnus X-1A passes in front of any background object?
Since 1 % 1, 1 * 1 and 1 - 1 do not add up, we must conclude that 1 + 1 is 3.

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