History of the Earth

Beyond the boundaries of established science an avalanche of exotic ideas compete for our attention. Experts tell us that these ideas should not be permitted to take up the time of working scientists, and for the most part they are surely correct. But what about the gems in the rubble pile? By what ground-rules might we bring extraordinary new possibilities to light?
moses
Posts: 1135
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 10:18 pm

History of the Earth

Unread post by moses » Mon Apr 20, 2020 5:49 am

End of previous topic "History of the Earth":
https://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/php ... 60#p128260

So here is the basics of my theory.
Earth and Mars and possibly Ganymede were orbiting out where the asteroid belt is now, in the Precambrian. Then some huge electrical current occurred which produced the Earth's oceans, the Martian crust erosion, the geological column with the fossils, the asteroids, and the Earth's magnetic field. The Atlantic Ocean seems certain to have been gouged out by a North-South Birkeland current producing the typical raised section in the middle and the typical sloping section at the edges.

After the breaking apart of this system the Earth went into a very elliptical orbit producing the ice ages. The Sun and the stars appeared for the first time thus being the Creation. Probably two interactions with Mars produced the Younger Dryas, and a wobbly Earth. After this came the circle and the cross formed by Venus and it's very dusty magnetosphere reflecting sunlight producing the crescent. Then came Noah or the Gilgamesh flood which was an interaction with Venus at distance, which wrecked carbon dating and changed from a 360 day year to our present 365.24 day year marked by the Great Pyramid.

Cheers,
Mo

Cargo
Posts: 390
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2010 2:02 am

Re: History of the Earth

Unread post by Cargo » Tue Apr 21, 2020 4:32 am

I like it. There's a lot which is likely pretty close. Of course, the oceans part is still a little iffy, and I think there are still other possibilities for how it actually happened. Including total local transformation. Of course this would be still connected to whatever solar environment was going on, including even Earth looking like a 'gas planet' for an unknown amount of time. We really don't know how long some of these in-between processes took.

Imagine a plasma aurora going full arc mode to the ground, for days, months... years? And then walking across the horizon. Perhaps starting, and stopping in hours or days long displays. I'd carve that in a rock.

The actual solar orbits were hugely different in early human time. And for the pre-man eras, it is very likely that Earth orbited a different Star (take your pick of those two out there gasing away) and such, the other sisters/god planets would be hugely visibly, and longer in view.

The prehistoric age, was in a completely different multi-star solar system.
interstellar filaments conducted electricity having currents as high as 10 thousand billion amperes

moses
Posts: 1135
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 10:18 pm

Re: History of the Earth

Unread post by moses » Wed Apr 22, 2020 2:47 am

Hi Cargo,
Actually I feel that the ocean gouging is the best part of the theory. Are you saying that the Earth had a greater atmosphere? I agree that there might have been long periods in between gougings.

I am thinking that the auroras would have been so intense that no stars or the Sun would have been visible. However if there was a current between Mars and Earth that might have been visible. I think that the rock carvings, petroglyphs, came after the break up of the old configuration.

My theory has the origin of Earth back before the Precambrian, which means that Earth was in some orbit about the Sun in Precambrian times.
Cheers,
Mo

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