The Dark Moon

Beyond the boundaries of established science an avalanche of exotic ideas compete for our attention. Experts tell us that these ideas should not be permitted to take up the time of working scientists, and for the most part they are surely correct. But what about the gems in the rubble pile? By what ground-rules might we bring extraordinary new possibilities to light? If you have a personal favorite theory, that is in someway related to the Electric Universe, this is where it can be posted.
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GaryN
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Re: The Dark Moon

Unread post by GaryN » Sat Oct 30, 2021 8:23 pm

Even a dash cam can see some stars:
https://youtu.be/4rH1_HnAcGU?list=TLPQM ... 81sQ&t=452

What about the Tesla Roadster Spaceman cameras?
https://youtu.be/aBr2kKAHN6M?t=6553
https://youtu.be/aBr2kKAHN6M?t=5729
Pretty strange stars.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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GaryN
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Re: The Dark Moon

Unread post by GaryN » Thu Nov 18, 2021 8:17 pm

This is interesting:
NOAA explains restriction on SpaceX launch webcast
https://spacenews.com/noaa-explains-res ... h-webcast/
SILVER SPRING, Md. — A cutoff of live video on a recent SpaceX launch reflects new awareness by regulators of the imaging capabilities of onboard cameras on launch vehicles and requirements for companies to adhere to laws that some in the industry believe are outdated.
...
For now, NOAA does not have the ability to waive the need for a license, including for upper stages with onboard cameras. “The law doesn’t provide for a waiver,” said Glenn Tallia, NOAA general counsel, at the meeting. “Any system that is basically a private remote sensing space system requires a license.”
So to use a camera in space requires a license, as it may show something that they don't want you to see for national security reasons. I say what they don't want you to see is not on Earth but in space, particularly when looking away from the Earth. The camera feed on the ISS and Dragon are controlled by NASA to ensure that any peculiar views of space that would raise awkward questions are not broadcast.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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GaryN
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Re: The Dark Moon

Unread post by GaryN » Tue Nov 23, 2021 7:53 pm

The longest partial eclipse of the Moon in hundreds of years and for centuries to come occurred recently and there are lots of photos taken from Earth of the red looking moon, but of course none from space. If I were to be standing on the Moon at the time would everything look reddish? No active cameras on the near side just now, but what about the view from the ISS? I looked here
https://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/SearchPhotos/S ... SS_Imagery
but no moon photos, and it seems like the ISS crew must not work weekends or have had no interest in this rare event. The change log shows:
November 22, 2021: Added images for 199 photos: STS067-728A-1 through STS067-728A-101 total 101, STS067-729-1 through STS067-729-98 total 98.
November 18, 2021: Added images for 1 photos: ISS066-E-78326 through ISS066-E-78326.
So we have no proof that the Moon actually looks red from space.
Here is a nice photo of stars though from the ISS:
https://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/DatabaseImages ... -61400.JPG
1 second at ISO 10,000 with a Nikon D5. Lets try that looking away from Earth. When stars are visible from some low light TV cameras, or dashcams, they are always just above the horizon, indicating that it is the atmosphere that must be involved, just as it is from the ISS. There is an increase in intensity of visible wavelengths.

I heard Elon Musk on an interview the other day and he mentioned he was intending to take the lens assembly from a cancelled NASA orbital telescope mission on one of his upcoming launches. That should be interesting. Wonder if it will use a Nikon D5 to take photos through that lens? And will he be allowed to look away from Earth??
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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GaryN
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Dark Mars?

Unread post by GaryN » Wed Apr 27, 2022 8:46 pm

Solar Irradiance Sensor on the ExoMars 2016 Lander
https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org ... 15-850.pdf

I can find no results for this experiment, which obviously makes me suspicious. So I wonder what might happen if they ever sent the same instrument to the Moon? They never will, as the measured values would be nothing like the theoretical values, which is probably why the Mars results are not available,
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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GaryN
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Re: The Dark Moon

Unread post by GaryN » Thu Apr 28, 2022 12:01 am

Oh, I see what happened. The 2016 lander crashed, but the same instrument is to be deployed on the lander supposed to fly in 2022. Can't wait to see if it crashes too, or maybe the instrument doesn't function for some reason. Or maybe they'll disprove my whole theory?
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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GaryN
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Re: The Dark Moon

Unread post by GaryN » Fri May 27, 2022 6:50 pm

Artemis Lighting Considerations Overview Technical Brief
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/file ... _ochmo.pdf

They talk about Lux but give no theoretical or measured values.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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GaryN
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Re: The Dark Moon

Unread post by GaryN » Sat Jun 25, 2022 2:04 am

BepiColombo’s first views of Mercury
The monitoring cameras provide black-and-white snapshots in 1024 x 1024 pixel resolution...
https://www.esa.int/Science_Exploration ... of_Mercury
Infrared capable camera again but they don't tell us that anywhere. Darker than the moon in the visible as it gets no Earthshine.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

Holger Isenberg
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Re: The Dark Moon

Unread post by Holger Isenberg » Sat Jun 25, 2022 6:50 pm

BepiColombo will be interesting when it finally captures color images. The first months of the mapping mission is apparently only panchromatic, then later they capture data from the color channels. There are at least 3 color cameras on board, one with relatively normal RGB range filters 420, 550, 750nm, one with slightly moved wavelengths into IR with 550, 750, 850 nm and one line array camera of 400 - 2000nm with 6.25nm for each of the 256 channels, that's an imaging spectrometer: https://link.springer.com/article/10.10 ... 20-00704-8

Imaging spectrometers are awesome, if they work fine without too much noise. Unfortunately, the CRISM instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter with about the same specifications as on BepiColombo wasn't producing any really usable visual light color images. For some reason I couldn't figure out yet, the signal-to-noise ratio was incredible bad within the typical RGB spectral ranges. Outside the RGB bands, in IR, it was better: http://crism.jhuapl.edu

Holger Isenberg
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Re: The Dark Moon

Unread post by Holger Isenberg » Sat Jun 25, 2022 7:01 pm

About the low SNR I noticed in the RGB bands of CRISM: It was, if I remember correctly from those about 20 raw images I looked at, only around 5:1 and often even worse. That would place it into the range of microscope cameras who also have to fight with those low light levels, see comparable graph on https://www.microscopyu.com/tutorials/c ... oise-ratio showing about 5 - 20 photons per pixel for a 5:1 SNR.

Normal commercial cameras have a 40dB SNR, see https://interceptor121.com/2020/04/23/s ... as-in-2020, which would be a 10000:1 ratio SNR. ratio := 10^(dB/10)

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GaryN
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Re: The Dark Moon

Unread post by GaryN » Sat Jun 25, 2022 8:00 pm

For some reason I couldn't figure out yet, the signal-to-noise ratio was incredible bad within the typical RGB spectral ranges.
Low light levels on Mars? We don't have measured light levels, or if we do they aren't telling us. I'll have a better look at the instruments now that Bepi has reached its destination.
I was just looking into how hot the surface of Mercury is. Extremely hot they tell us, up to 750-800 F. How is this temperature measured? It isn't as far as I can see, it is calculated based on assumptions.
We can measure the amount of light reflected from a planet, but how do we know the amount striking it? The light, of course, originates at the Sun, which radiates as a blackbody of temperature about T = 5800 K.
https://web.njit.edu/~gary/320/Lecture14.html
Objection! The temperature of the Sun has never been directly measured from space.
It doesn't seem like BepiColumbo has any instruments to directly measure the surface temperature of Mercury either, such as a pyrometer.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

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