Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Many Internet forums have carried discussion of the Electric Universe hypothesis. Much of that discussion has added more confusion than clarity, due to common misunderstandings of the electrical principles. Here we invite participants to discuss their experiences and to summarize questions that have yet to be answered.

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Jarvamundo
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Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by Jarvamundo » Tue Jan 04, 2011 1:08 am

wow epic read there allynh

allynh
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Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Wed Jan 05, 2011 2:48 pm

The part about the political runaround and suppression is a sad part of the story, but not the surprising part, I've found that in all fields. I collect books and DVDs that address resistance to paradigm shifts like that.

What disturbs me is the concept that the velocity of light is c + v, that is a game changer.

I thought all we had to do was go back to Maxwell and we could start fresh, but it seems he took the simple work around of looking at wave only. Yikes!

If anybody knows of a good book that goes into detail about c + v, post it here.

Thanks...

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Jarvamundo
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Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by Jarvamundo » Wed Jan 05, 2011 3:23 pm

You might find it worthwhile to examine the "Sagnac Experiment", Prof Hilton Ratcliff covers it in one of his books... "Virtue of Heresey" i think, well worth a squizz indeed..... or just google and examine both sides, pay attention to the locations of the sources in the experiment and how relativists then draw their diagrams.

Einstein to Sagnac: "It has nothing to do with relativity"
Sagnac to Einstein: "Then relativity has nothing to do with reality"
(see book)

This Radio-Venus story of the use of 'organized' timed measurements just wreaks of AGW and removing temperature monitoring stations & mixing data with erroneous satellite sources. I look forward to examining further.

Thankfully the internet gives all voices the ability to publish.

allynh
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Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Wed Jan 05, 2011 4:12 pm

I have the The Virtue of Heresy by Ratcliffe on my to-be-read pile, I'll read that next.

The "Sagnac" search took me to many scary links including this one.

Newton Physics by Paul Marmet
http://www.newtonphysics.on.ca/index.html

There are a bunch of books and essays on the site that look interesting.

Thanks...

allynh
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Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:51 pm

Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Sat Jan 08, 2011 7:04 pm

Into the Universe with Stephen Hawking, is now available on DVD.
Into.jpg
Into.jpg (20.59 KiB) Viewed 18518 times

allynh
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Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Mon Jan 17, 2011 6:51 pm

I stumbled across the noFilmSchool site a couple of weeks ago, where they are shooting movies using DSLR cameras.

noFilmSchool
http://nofilmschool.com/

This is the page with "10 examples of stunning DSLR cinematography".
http://nofilmschool.com/2010/01/10-exam ... atography/

The things they are doing is scary, shocking, and I had no clue six months ago that this stuff was happening.

Look at the video I pointed out upstream.

Decay Rates and Time: http://larouchepac.com/node/16224

From what I've been able to see, the EU Team could use DSLR cameras, a sound system, and a small space to record high quality video like above. It does not require a large space.

There could be a few key sites where the videos could be shot, each using the same kind of equipment, and then have one central place cut what is shot. Skype is being used to direct people from a distance, so the same person in one central location could direct and cut the video shot anywhere in the world.

People who speak at Ted practice their speech before they actually appear on stage. The person directing through Skype could help the person with the speech before shooting. That would avoid the classic mess I see in most conferences.

The technology is changing fast, allowing high quality video at low entry cost.

fosborn
Posts: 194
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Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by fosborn » Thu Jan 20, 2011 5:34 am

allynh » Mar 8th, '09, 21:00
I found the great series from 1985, Caltech: The Mechanical Universe and Beyond, on Google.
If some have disappeared from google go here;
http://www.learner.org/resources/series42.html
Due to licensing agreements, online viewing of the videos for this resource is restricted to network connections in the United States and Canada
This site has them all for free viewing. :D In the US and Canada. :|

allynh
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Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Thu Jan 20, 2011 7:10 pm

The videos on the Learner site are the same resolution/quality as the Google ones I linked to. The Google video is accessible to download where the Learner is not. I'm still amazed that the price of the series on DVD is still sky high. I want those DVDs; drool, drool... I'd buy them in a heartbeat if they dropped down to a normal series price. Everybody would buy them.

allynh
Posts: 919
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:51 pm

Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Fri Jan 28, 2011 6:40 pm

Grab this Orrery simulator before it vanishes.

Orrery Movie
http://dd.dynamicdiagrams.com/2011/01/orrery-movie/
orrery.jpg
Right click on the link bellow and "save as" the file to your disk.

Orrery Movie
http://dd.dynamicdiagrams.com/wp-conten ... y_2006.swf

To view the simulation open the file in your browser. It is a Flash program, so works for me in Safari and Firefox. I saved the file to a folder, then "bookmarked" the file so I can open it whenever I want.

Move the cursor around the page and see the different controls. There is a "help" button in the upper left corner that toggles instructions on/off.

Switch to "Tychonian" view, turn on "trace planet", like Mars, and watch the epicycles happen.

Wow!

allynh
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Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Sat Jan 29, 2011 9:56 pm

These are the Velikovsky classics available from:

http://www.paradigma-publishing.com/books1.html

Worlds in Collision

Earth in Upheaval

From the Exodus to King Akhnaton - Vol. I of Ages in Chaos

Ramses II and His Time - Vol. II of Ages in Chaos

Mankind in Amnesia

Then there is a set by his daughter.

ABA - The Glory and the Torment
The Life of Dr. Immanuel Velikovsky - Ruth Velikovsky Sharon

Immanuel Velikovsky - The Truth Behind the Torment - Ruth Velikovsky Sharon

They are new editions, full size Trade Paperbacks, better priced than the used originals.

This is a list of critical reference books that were all published before WWI.

Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1911)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encycloped ... th_Edition

I was hoping to find something like this online. The old texts show what little we knew, and seem a bit more honest in their ignorance. There are links to multiple sources of the scanned pages. The word Galaxy isn't even listed, nor Universe, everything was still Nebula. The entry for Nebula starts at page 332:

http://en.wikisource.org/w/index.php?ti ... ge=EC9A348

Just keep clicking "next" to move through the pages.

Look at Nebular Theory, page 333, as the first, hesitant, description of how the Solar System was formed.

http://en.wikisource.org/w/index.php?ti ... ge=EC9A351

This is how the entry begins and ends.
01.jpg
02.jpg
They clearly state that it is all speculation, with no proof.

The past 100 years of Science has merely frozen what was once hopeful speculation into what is now carved-in-stone dogma; still with no proof. The B&W versions from the Internet Archive are best for what I need.

This book is available as pdf download.

The Astrophysical journal, Volume 14 By American Astronomical Society, University of Chicago (1901)
http://books.google.com/books?id=CH8OAA ... re&f=false

This book is available as pdf download.

Popular astronomy, Volume 16; Volume 1908 By Carleton College. Goodsell Observatory
http://books.google.com/books?id=XZ8RAA ... re&f=false

This book is from 1885 and is only in "limited view" online, but is available from Amazon.

An elementary treatise on the lunar theory (1885) By Hugh Godfray
Google Books Result

The importance of the books are the fact that they are all pre-Velikovsky and pre-Einstein, so that you can see the common knowledge before the propaganda machines kicked in distorting science.

allynh
Posts: 919
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:51 pm

Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Sat Jan 29, 2011 11:06 pm

Everything is Fluid Mechanics. The Aether, Plasma. etc..., is all Fluid. The Fluid Mechanics book I used in school was:

Elementary Fluid Mechanics by John K. Vennard - 5th edition - 1975

The ones available on Amazon are:

Elementary Fluid Mechanics [Paperback] ~ $29.40<----Possibly the original Edition. I don't know how useful this one is.

http://www.amazon.com/Elementary-Fluid- ... 290&sr=1-1

Elementary Fluid Mechanics, 7th Edition [Hardcover] ~ $117.67

http://www.amazon.com/Elementary-Fluid- ... _orig_subj

On ABEBooks I see several 5th editions, from 1975, for under ten bucks.

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchR ... &x=30&y=11

The 5th edition is all you need; the latest book is not necessarily the best since they are building on the original.

If you understand circuit design, then you can understand the stuff in this book.

fosborn
Posts: 194
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 7:53 pm

Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by fosborn » Sun Jan 30, 2011 10:07 am

allynh wrote:Everything is Fluid Mechanics. The Aether, Plasma. etc..., is all Fluid. The Fluid Mechanics book I used in school was:

Elementary Fluid Mechanics by John K. Vennard - 5th edition - 1975

The ones available on Amazon are:

Elementary Fluid Mechanics [Paperback] ~ $29.40<----Possibly the original Edition. I don't know how useful this one is.

http://www.amazon.com/Elementary-Fluid- ... 290&sr=1-1

Elementary Fluid Mechanics, 7th Edition [Hardcover] ~ $117.67

http://www.amazon.com/Elementary-Fluid- ... _orig_subj

On ABEBooks I see several 5th editions, from 1975, for under ten bucks.

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchR ... &x=30&y=11

The 5th edition is all you need; the latest book is not necessarily the best since they are building on the original.

If you understand circuit design, then you can understand the stuff in this book.
I found a free PDF 1940 version at ; http://www.archive.org/details/elementa ... m032659mbp

Thanks for the idea. :)

allynh
Posts: 919
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:51 pm

Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:04 pm

fosborn wrote: I found a free PDF 1940 version at ; http://www.archive.org/details/elementa ... m032659mbp
Awesome! Speechless!

A few years ago I had a pipe burst that destroyed some of my College books. I lost Chemistry, Physics, and Electronics, the very books that I need now, but did not lose the two versions of Differential Equations that I could never figure out and that I will never use. I've spent the day trying to reconstruct a set of books to learn Chemistry, Physics, and Electronics again. I checked the UNM site and looked at course lists; apparently the multidisciplinary approach we had in the 70s is long gone. Judging from the lists I wonder if the EE guys even learn circuit design anymore. I learned more Electronics in High School than the College kids today seem to, so I'm having a heck of time finding something useful.

I've tentatively found a few books, but from the prices it is clear that some scam is going on. The most expensive book I bought in the 70s was 20 bucks, paying over 200 today is bizarre. If you compare the multi-volume high priced editions of today to the single volume lower priced editions of decades ago, and look at the ratings for each, the newer are worse.

<-----------------Looks promising.
Chemistry: A Molecular Approach (2nd US Edition) [Hardcover]
Nivaldo J. Tro (Author)
isbn - 0321651782

<-----------------Looks okay, but earlier editions look better.
University Physics with Modern Physics with MasteringPhysics (12th Edition) [Hardcover]
Hugh D. Young (Author), Roger A. Freedman (Author)
isbn - 080532187X

<----------This is the 10th edition, 2000
Sears and Zemansky's University Physics With Modern Physics (Addison-Wesley Series in Physics) [Hardcover]
Hugh D. Young (Author), Roger A. Freedman (Author), T. R. Sandin (Author), A. Lewis Ford (Author)
isbn - 0201603365

I'm looking at editions that are pre-COBE, pre-Dark Matter. In other words, actual science rather than current SciFi. I'm trying to learn something, not please a professor to pass a course.

Luckily I saved my Calculus book and Fluids, so I'm set there. If you know any great books about Chemistry, Physics, or Electronics give a yell. The old editions are still out there somewhere; far cheaper, and good enough for me.

As example, I found this blog entry when I went searching.

University Physics, by Francis Weston Sears (1955) and Mark W. Zemansky
http://fredslibrary.wordpress.com/2010/ ... -zemansky/
University Physics, by Francis Weston Sears (1955) and Mark W. Zemansky

This is the text I used in what we called at that time “Sophomore Physics.” In 1957 it was the rule that freshmen took algebra, trig, and analytical geometry their first year, and then were prepared for calculus based physics in their sophomore year (of course taking calculus concurrently.) Oh, how I struggled with this book. My high-school science program was less than strong, far less. I was not a prepared student for physics. I had taken physics in high school but it was the worst course I’ve ever had, the way it was taught. My course in bookkeeping was far better.

Dr. Ted George was my instructor at Murray State College (now Murray State University.) He was a masterful teacher, and I was able to do excellent work in the first semester. The second semester of physics, the electricity and magnetism part, threw me for a loop. Dr. George allowed me to retake a test on which I had done miserably. I studied extremely hard, and finally got myself organized in a way to understand the way one thinks in physics. As a result I did go on to do well in the course – then, in my junior year, changed my major from pre-engineering to majors in physics and mathematics.

Looking at the evolution of physics texts since I took it in 1956-57 I am astounded. There was the Berkeley Series of 5 or so volumes. Halliday and Resnick developed an excellent text that eventually bloomed also into a multivolume version. The Feynman Lectures was an extraordinary achievement and a total failure as an instructional text. I used those volumes to prepare for my doctoral prelims.

I won’t forget this red book, smaller, I think, than World Without End. It had all the elements of classical physics in it. It had an excellent set of problems for student solutions. The diagrams were simple, but effective.

I don’t know if we have done well for our students by developing larger and larger (and outrageously expensive) books. Some of the best books in physics are not so large. I think of Herbert Goldstein’s Classical Mechanics, or Quantum Mechanics by Leonard Schiff. I’ve kept my first version of Fundamentals of Physics. It’s a one-volume edition, and gives me all the information I need when I need to look up something. If I still had my original edition of Sears and Zemansky, I’m sure it would have sufficed as well. I am not convinced that elaborate multi-colored diagrams and high-resolution photographs add all that much to the student’s learning.

Sears, Francis Weston (1955) and Mark W. Zemansky. University Physics. Cambridge, MA: Addison-Wesley. LOC: 55005026
I'm going to track down the 2nd edition and start searching decade by decade on Google Books for any Physics books in pdf. I'l post what I find.

Thanks...

allynh
Posts: 919
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:51 pm

Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Sun Feb 06, 2011 8:13 pm

Here are some Wolfram Demonstration pages I used in another thread. Just download the free Mathematica Player so you can download and run the demonstrations.

Visualizing Atomic Orbitals
http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/Visua ... cOrbitals/
popup_4.jpg
Atomic orbitals show the electron density for an electron of a given energy. Plotting these electron densities in three dimensions gives the shapes representing the various atomic orbitals. The subset of atomic orbitals visualized are 1s, 2p, 3d and 4f.
Linear Combinations of p Orbitals
http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/Linea ... POrbitals/
popup_p.jpg
The real forms of atomic orbitals are constructed by taking appropriate linear combinations of the complex forms of these orbitals. The one-electron wavefunctions resulting from the solution of the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom are complex functions except when . Boundary surface pictures of atomic orbitals typically only show the real part of these complex functions and often leave out the sign information as well. Here, boundary surfaces of the orbitals are drawn with coloring to indicate the real and imaginary components as well as the positive and negative signs. These color-coded atomic orbitals illustrate the linear combinations of the complex wavefunctions that produce the familiar and orbitals.
Linear Combinations of d Orbitals
http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/Linea ... DOrbitals/
popup_d.jpg
Chemistry students encountering atomic orbitals for the first time often wonder why the orbital looks so different from the others. The answer is related to the fact that boundary surface pictures of atomic orbitals typically show only the real part of these complex functions and often leave out the sign information as well. The one-electron wavefunctions resulting from the solution of the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom are complex functions except when . The real forms of atomic orbitals can be constructed by taking appropriate linear combinations of the complex forms. Here, boundary surfaces of the orbitals are colored to indicate the real and imaginary components as well as the positive and negative signs. These color-coded atomic orbitals illustrate the linear combinations of the complex wavefunctions that result in the familiar four-lobe pictures.
Linear Combinations of f Orbitals
http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/Linea ... FOrbitals/
popup_f.jpg
It is less common to find the atomic orbitals illustrated in chemistry textbooks than the , , and orbitals. Boundary surface pictures of any of these atomic orbitals typically only show the real part of these complex functions and often leave out the sign information as well. The one-electron wavefunctions resulting from the solution of the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom are complex functions except when . The real forms of atomic orbitals can be constructed by taking appropriate linear combinations of the complex forms. Here, boundary surfaces of the orbitals are colored to indicate the real and imaginary components as well as the positive and negative signs.
Hydrogen Orbitals
http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/HydrogenOrbitals/
popup_h.jpg
Equiprobability surfaces for hydrogen orbitals correspond to the wavefunctions . Here is the principal quantum number, is the total angular momentum quantum number, and is the magnetic quantum number. Hydrogen orbitals are covered in a first-year quantum mechanics course. The pictures presented are typically ambiguous in what they display. The proper way is to show equiprobability surfaces.
Polar Plots of Legendre Polynomials
http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/Polar ... lynomials/
popup_2.jpg
Legendre polynomials are solutions to the Legendre differential equation, which is a form of Laplace's equation in spherical coordinates. These forms commonly occur in antenna patterns and electron orbitals, among others.

allynh
Posts: 919
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:51 pm

Re: Caltech: The Mechanical Universe

Unread post by allynh » Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:44 pm

Here are two more Wolfram Demonstration Projects*.

Enigmatic Comet Holmes
http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/EnigmaticCometHolmes/
popup_1.jpg
Comet 17P/Holmes has had a history of producing outbursts of activity; the exact cause is still unknown. Regardless of the cause, the result is that the coma of the comet expands as fresh dust is released from the comet nucleus. Snapshot 1 shows a large coma, a short tail, and an orientation that closely matches that of the comet when it underwent its most recent outburst.
Play with the controls and watch how the comet changed size and the way the tail moved. Hit the plus signs and you can change or play any of the controls, alone or fire them all up.

Used in the Holmes gets very bright thread.

Earth's Second Moon
http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/EarthsSecondMoon/
popup_2.jpg
Since prehistoric times, mankind has known about the bright object in the sky that is visible even when the Sun has risen: our Moon. However, in much more recent times we have discovered a second object, 3753 Cruithne (1986 TO), that orbits the Sun in almost exactly the same period as Earth and comes fairly close to Earth. The result of this odd set of circumstances is that, at least from certain points of view, it seems Earth has a second moon with a kidney-bean shaped orbit.
The program will download a big chunk from the server, so let it run a bit. Click the plus symbol to get to the controls, and let it run.

Watch how Cruithne moves with the Sun centered. In one view you can see that both orbit the Sun.
normal.jpg
In the "fixed Earth" view, Cruithne is orbiting near Earth.
fixed Earth.jpg
If that doesn't burn your brain, nothing will.

Used in the Are the planets growing? thread.

* Just download the free Mathematica Player so you can download and run the demonstrations.

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