Earth Was a Moon of Saturn

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Conjecture: Who Sent Saturn?

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Thu Apr 05, 2018 12:50 pm

But as we all know Venus regularly transits the sun. At intervalls of 8 years, 121.5 years, 8 years, and 105.5 years, it passes between the sun and earth, so that its plasmasphere/tail brushes the earth's magnetosphere.


Since the orbits are tilted, the planets seldom are in a direct line with the Sun. Additionally, although the plasmasphere tail Venus is very long, it does not quite extend to Earth. However, it is possible for the Moon to fall into place in such a conjunction, and provide a remaining path to the circuit.

I could be wrong but I believe the Moon is the only satellite of any planet to enter/exit its host planets plasmasphere. Which opens a whole can of worms :)

There would be an incubation period (3 months). SARS had such a conjunction 3 months previous to the first outbreak. So did The Great Influenza ... cases were reported on either side of the Atlantic nearly simultaneously for the latter.
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Saturn

Unread postby rickard » Sun Apr 08, 2018 12:39 pm

According to Wal Thornhill Saturn was initially a brown dvarf star that entered our solar system.
From where did it came ? Where was it created ?
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Sun Apr 08, 2018 12:49 pm

Sentimentally,

I'd like to think he sent himself - to learn, and then after a long time away - got to come home.
"I decided to believe, as you might decide to take
an aspirin: It can't hurt, and you might get better."
-- Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum (1988)
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby rickard » Wed Apr 11, 2018 3:24 am

Younger Dryas wrote:Sentimentally,

I'd like to think he sent himself - to learn, and then after a long time away - got to come home.

Like the "lost son" in the Bible ;)

But it would be interesting to know how the origin of Saturn is explaned by the EU.
Did it come from an other solar system ?
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby D_Archer » Wed Apr 11, 2018 8:13 am

rickard wrote:
Younger Dryas wrote:Sentimentally,

I'd like to think he sent himself - to learn, and then after a long time away - got to come home.

Like the "lost son" in the Bible ;)

But it would be interesting to know how the origin of Saturn is explaned by the EU.
Did it come from an other solar system ?


Hi Rickard,

Accourding to EU:
Saturn was a star first with its own satellites (together with the Earth), Saturn was our primeval star (Kronos). The complete saturn system was adopted by Sol (our current sun), a younger hotter star than Saturn.

Saturn was probably a red star/brown dwarf before being captured by Sol.
---

Regards,
Daniel
- Shoot Forth Thunder -
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby nick c » Wed Apr 11, 2018 8:38 am

Hi rickard,
According to Wal Thornhill Saturn was initially a brown dvarf star that entered our solar system.
From where did it came ?
I can't speak for Wal, but according to my understanding Saturn was captured by the Sun. So the answer to your question is interstellar space.
Keep in mind, that presently of the 10 closest stellar systems to our Sun there are 15 known stars and 11 of those are brown or red dwarfs (and none of these dwarfs are visible to the naked eye.)
see:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_n ... own_dwarfs

From this it is a safe assumption that brown and red dwarfs are the most common stellar types in the galaxy. Also, one can safely assume that there is a continuum of celestial objects where some are "in between" or intermediate objects. Hence the often used description of the present day Jupiter and Saturn as failed or dark stars.

In the EU paradigm the position of a star on the Hertsprung-Russell diagram describes its electrical state and that is subject to change as the ambient electrical environment changes. This is in contrast to the mainstream's interpretation that the H-R diagram depicts slow stellar evolution.


Where was it created ?
Consistent with the Electric Star model we can assume that the hypothesized proto Saturn was created in one of two ways.
1. In a molecular gas (plasma) cloud through a z pinch of a galactic birkeland current
2. or, it fissioned from a larger stellar object, which went nova while under electrical stress (from a galactic birkeland current)

As a note, Cardona proposed that the proto Saturn brown dwarf was transported to the Milky Way through a merger with the Sagitarrius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy.
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby rickard » Wed Apr 11, 2018 10:30 am

Hi Nick,

Thank you for the interesting information.

There are also many wandering planets out there ...
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... ut-a-home/

R
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Re: Earth Was a Moon of Saturn

Unread postby Xuxalina Rihhia » Wed Dec 05, 2018 10:47 pm

The water in Saturn's rings and satellites is like that on Earth except for moon Phoebe, which is out of this world

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-saturn-sa ... e.html#jCp

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-saturn-sa ... hoebe.html

By developing a new method for measuring isotopic ratios of water and carbon dioxide remotely, scientists have found that the water in Saturn's rings and satellites is unexpectedly like water on the Earth, except on Saturn's moon Phoebe, where the water is more unusual than on any other object so far studied in the Solar System.

The results, found in the Icarus paper "Isotopic Ratios of Saturn's Rings and Satellites: Implications for the Origin of Water and Phoebe" by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Roger N. Clark, also mean we need to change models of the formation of the Solar System because the new results are in conflict with existing models. Robert H. Brown (U. Arizona), Dale P. Cruikshank (NASA), and Gregg A. Swayze (USGS) are co-authors.

Isotopes are different forms of elements but with differing numbers of neutrons. Adding a neutron adds mass to the element, and that can change processes of how a planet, comet, or moon is formed. Water is composed of two hydrogen (H) atoms and one oxygen atom, H2O. Adding a neutron to one hydrogen atom, then called deuterium (D), increases the mass of a water molecule (HDO) by about 5 percent, and that small change results in isotopic differences in the formation of a planet, moon, or comet, and changes the evaporation of water after formation. The deuterium to hydrogen ratio (D/H) is a fingerprint of the formation conditions, including temperature and evolution over time. Evaporating water enriches deuterium in the remaining surface.

Models for the formation of the Solar System indicate that the D/H should be much higher in the colder outer Solar System than in the hotter inner system where the Earth formed. Deuterium is more abundant in cold molecular clouds. Some models predict the D/H should be 10 times higher for the Saturn system than on Earth. But the new measurements show this is not the case for Saturn's rings and satellites except Saturn's moon Phoebe.

The discovery of an unusual deuterium to hydrogen isotopic ratio (D/H) for Saturn's moon Phoebe means it was formed in and comes from a far part of the Solar System, Clark said. "Phoebe's D/H ratio is the highest value yet measured in the Solar System, implying an origin in the cold outer Solar System far beyond Saturn."

The team also measured the carbon-13 to carbon-12 (13C/12C) ratio on Saturn's moon Iapetus and Phoebe. Iapetus, which also has D/H similar to Earth, also has 13C/12C close to Earth's values, but Phoebe is almost five times higher in the carbon isotope. The carbon dioxide presence places limits on how much of Phoebe could have evaporated to space after formation, leaving the only possibility that Phoebe formed in the very cold outer reaches of the Solar System, much further out than Saturn, and was subsequently perturbed into an orbit where it was captured by Saturn. Exactly how far out Phoebe originated is unknown. There are currently no measurements of D/H or 13C/12C for the icy surfaces on Pluto or Kuiper Belt objects beyond Pluto, but this new methodology will enable us to make such measurements of the surface ices.

The measurements were made from the NASA Cassini spacecraft using the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) over the course of the mission. An improved calibration of the instrument, completed early in 2018, enabled the precision needed for these measurements of reflected light from the rings and satellites. The new method of measuring isotopic ratios on solids like water ice and carbon dioxide ice using reflectance spectroscopy remotely will enable measurements of isotopic ratios for other objects throughout the Solar System, putting further constraints on models of Solar System formation.

The Saturn system D/H values close to the Earth's values imply a similar water source for the inner and outer Solar System, and new models need to be developed where the change from inner to outer Solar System is less.

The NASA Europa Clipper mission could be used to measure isotopic ratios on the icy Galilean satellites around Jupiter, and Clark is a Co-Investigator on the mission and hopes to make such measurements.

Explore further: Scientists Discover Pluto Kin Is a Member of Saturn Family

More information: Roger N. Clark et al. Isotopic Ratios of Saturn's Rings and Satellites: Implications for the Origin of Water and Phoebe, Icarus (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.icarus.2018.11.029

Journal reference: Icarus search and more info website

Provided by: Planetary Science Institute search and more info website


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-saturn-sa ... e.html#jCp
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