Hayabusa 2 is about to launch!

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Hayabusa 2 is about to launch!

Unread postby upriver » Tue Dec 02, 2014 8:04 pm

Maybe well get a straight story out of this mission.
Does anybody know what the Japanese think about comets and asteroids?

"Hayabusa 2's H-IIA rocket has just reached its launchpad! Japan's next asteroid sample return mission was supposed to launch this weekend, but weather has not been good at the Tanegashima launch site and it has been delayed four days already. The current launch date and time is December 3 at 04:22 UT (13:22 JST, or December 2 at 20:22, PT). There may be a live webcast available here, and as usual, Spaceflightnow.com will be providing live text and hopefully video updates. I also suggest the NASASpaceflight.com forumas an excellent place to look for screen caps of launch milestones. That's where I found this video of the launch rollout, all 32 minutes of it:"
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-la ... aunch.html
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Re: Hayabusa 2 is about to launch!

Unread postby MattEU » Sat Dec 06, 2014 11:26 am

On the asteroid front they seem to be totally with the mainstream idea. Even after the original Hayabusa mission to asteroid Itokawa gave them amazing images of rocks and regolith and of course the classic peanut shape that asteroids and comets share. The last page shows their thinking after that mission.

Not sure about their view on comets though ...
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Re: Hayabusa 2 is about to launch!

Unread postby willendure » Sat Dec 06, 2014 2:02 pm

MattEU wrote:On the asteroid front they seem to be totally with the mainstream idea. Even after the original Hayabusa mission to asteroid Itokawa gave them amazing images of rocks and regolith and of course the classic peanut shape that asteroids and comets share.


Great images in that one, thanks.

Any idea what way that asteroid is rotating?
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Re: Hayabusa 2 is about to launch!

Unread postby Solar » Fri Jul 12, 2019 12:46 pm

"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden
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Re: Hayabusa 2 is about to launch!

Unread postby ja7tdo » Sat Jul 13, 2019 4:42 pm

willendure wrote:Any idea what way that asteroid is rotating?

Asteroids rotate as electrostatic motors. The solar wind contains protons and electrons. Asteroids are rocks, so rocks are dielectrics that store electrons. On the sun's side, asteroids collect electrons.On the other side of the sun, electrons escape into space.The inflow and emission of electrons cause the asteroid to rotate like a motor.The same mechanism is happening to Mercury.
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Re: Hayabusa 2 is about to launch!

Unread postby neilwilkes » Tue Jul 23, 2019 5:30 am

MattEU wrote:On the asteroid front they seem to be totally with the mainstream idea. Even after the original Hayabusa mission to asteroid Itokawa gave them amazing images of rocks and regolith and of course the classic peanut shape that asteroids and comets share. The last page shows their thinking after that mission.

Not sure about their view on comets though ...


Indeed some great images of an object that does indeed look just like the one Rosetta just landed on too.
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Re: Hayabusa 2 is about to launch!

Unread postby allynh » Thu Nov 14, 2019 4:06 pm

Japan's Space Probe Is Returning to Earth With an Actual Piece of Asteroid
https://www.sciencealert.com/japan-s-sp ... f-asteroid
Japan's Hayabusa-2 probe will leave its orbit around a distant asteroid and head for Earth on Wednesday after an unprecedented mission, carrying samples that could shed light on the origins of the Solar System.

The long voyage home would begin at 10:05 am (0105 GMT), with the probe expected to drop off its precious samples some time late 2020, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) said.

"We expect Hayabusa-2 will provide new scientific knowledge to us," project manager Yuichi Tsuda told reporters.

The probe will bring back to Earth "carbon and organic matter" that will provide data as to "how the matter is scattered around the Solar System, why it exists on the asteroid and how it is related to Earth," added Tsuda.

The mission took the fridge-sized probe some 300 million kilometres (186 million miles) from Earth, where it explored the asteroid Ryugu, whose name means "Dragon Palace" in Japanese - a reference to a castle at the bottom of the ocean in an ancient fable.

In April, Hayabusa-2 fired an "impactor" into the asteroid to stir up materials that had not previously been exposed to the atmosphere.

It then made a "perfect" touchdown on the surface of the asteroid to collect the samples that scientists hope will provide clues into what the Solar System was like at its birth some 4.6 billion years ago.

"I'm feeling half-sad, half-determined to do our best to get the probe home," said Tsuda.

"Ryugu has been at the heart of our everyday life for the past year and a half," he added.

'New destination'

Hayabusa-2 will receive its orders to head for home on Wednesday, break free of the asteroid's gravity on November 18 and fire its main engines early next month en route to Earth, JAXA said.

Tsuda said the six-year mission, which had a price tag of around 30 billion yen (US$278 million), had exceeded expectations but admitted his team had to overcome a host of technical problems.

It took the probe three-and-a-half years to get to the asteroid but the return journey should be significantly shorter because Earth and Ryugu will be much closer due to their current positions.

Hayabusa-2 is expected to drop the samples off in the South Australian desert, but JAXA is negotiating with the Australian government about how to arrange it, Tsuda said.

The probe is the successor to JAXA's first asteroid explorer "Hayabusa", which means falcon in Japanese.

The earlier probe returned with dust samples from a smaller, potato-shaped asteroid in 2010 despite various setbacks during its epic seven-year odyssey, and was hailed as a scientific triumph.

The first generation probe re-entered Earth's atmosphere and burned out.

Under the current plan, Hayabusa-2 will boldly continue its journey in space after dropping off its capsule to Earth, and might "carry out another asteroid exploration," JAXA spokesman Keiichi Murakami earlier told AFP.

"The team has just started to study what can be done (after dropping off the capsule)," but there is no concrete plans about a new destination, Tsuda said.

© Agence France-Presse

They hope to land the sample in Australia. Why does this make me think of classic SciFi movies. HA!

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