tpods of 2011 (post august) archive

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December 29, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 30, 2011 Is it the breaking and reconnecting of magnetic field lines that power solar phenomena? According to a popular view of the Sun, its core pressure is supposed to be so high that it crushes hydrogen atoms together … Continue reading
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December 29, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 29, 2011 Galaxies often exhibit alignment with one another across vast distances. According to Electric Universe theory, galactic evolution occurs as large-scale plasma discharges form spinning wheels of coherent filaments that display electrodynamic behavior and not merely that which … Continue reading
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December 28, 2011 by Rens van der Sluijs
Dec 28, 2011 Science and folk tradition are supposed to be strictly separate domains of knowledge, but in practice they often shade into each other. The image shown above right attempts to map the entire visible universe. The galaxies tend … Continue reading
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December 27, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 27, 2011 A pair of field aligned currents can be seen discharging from the core of this active galaxy. Any substance containing charged particles is a plasma: electrons, positive ions, electrically charged dust, neon lights, lightning, planetary magnetospheres, the … Continue reading
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December 26, 2011 by Prof. Donald E. Scott
  Dec 26, 2011 Electric currents create magnetic fields in the Sun. “Which came first, the chicken or the egg?” Asking this question always gets a chuckle from a group of kids who haven’t been asked that before. For adults, … Continue reading
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December 23, 2011 by Rens van der Sluijs
Dec 23, 2011 In parts of the Amazonian rainforest, traditional costume included a headdress consisting of a circular arrangement of feathers. The ring of 36 feathers, most of which are white, lacks an obvious counterpart in the skies we see … Continue reading
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December 22, 2011 by Mel Acheson
Dec 22, 2011 This image of the Christmas Ornament nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud looks the same to Electric Universe and Gravity Universe proponents alike. Their radically contrary descriptions of what it is result from their ideas about what … Continue reading
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December 21, 2011 by Rens van der Sluijs
Dec 21, 2011 Nary a traditional culture failed to believe that the gods modelled the ‘lesser’ things on earth, including many aspects of human life, on the ‘greater’ things in the sky. European esoteric belief systems shared and elaborated this … Continue reading
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December 20, 2011 by Mel Acheson
Dec 20, 2011 Is hot gas sloshing in a gravitational wine glass—or is astrophysicists’ reasoning going in a circle? A recent press release explains: “Like wine in a glass, vast clouds of hot gas are sloshing back and forth….” The … Continue reading
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December 19, 2011 by Mel Acheson
  Dec 19, 2011 A recent press release proclaims that “astronomers have obtained the first direct evidence that black holes are common in the early Universe.” The tortuous path of prevarication between the evidence and the hole is direct evidence … Continue reading
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December 16, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 16, 2011 New images of the third largest asteroid reveal etched chasms and deep holes. The Dawn mission continues in orbit around Vesta. Vesta is ranked high among minor planets, with Pallas (531 kilometers) and Ceres (952 kilometers) as … Continue reading
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December 15, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 15, 2011 Enceladus joins other celestial objects that produce “magnetic bubbles.” In a recent Picture of the Day, the so-called “bubbles” of magnetism supposedly found by the Voyager spacecraft at the boundary where the Sun’s heliosphere meets the ISM … Continue reading
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December 14, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 14, 2011 Matter from the Interstellar Medium has been detected by Voyager 1. A postulate of the Electric Sun hypothesis presupposes the Sun to be the positive terminal in a circuit, or anode. The negative electrode, or “virtual” cathode, … Continue reading
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December 13, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 13, 2011 A remote galaxy is said to host two black holes. Could an electrical explanation better fit the observation? Electric Universe advocates propose that electric currents in plasma generate magnetic fields that constrict the current. As previous Picture … Continue reading
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December 12, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 12, 2011 Sediment samples indicate that there is a layer of nickel-rich ash covering the bottom of all the world’s oceans. Could cosmic plasma discharges be responsible? The bottom of the ocean is assumed to be a dark, cold … Continue reading
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December 9, 2011 by Frederic Jueneman
Dec 09, 2011 Throughout human history the planet Mars has held mankind’s rapt attention. When telescopes were sufficiently advanced by the late nineteenth century, the red planet seasonally fogged over with dust storms. After such storms it appeared to darken … Continue reading
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December 8, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 08, 2011 “Bubbles” of magnetic energy are said to surround the Sun’s heliosheath. “In all our quest of greatness, like wanton boys, whose pastime is their care, we follow after bubbles, blown in the air.” — John Webster According … Continue reading
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December 7, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 07, 2011 Alfvén waves are said to carry heat from the Sun’s photosphere out to its corona. “Giant twisting waves” have been detected in the Sun’s lower atmosphere, prompting heliophysicists to speculate that they are transporting heat energy upward … Continue reading
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December 5, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Dec 06, 2011 More news about black holes is increasing the distortion of reason. According to a recent press release, two black holes with masses exceeding “9 billion times the mass of the Sun” have been detected. The supposed … Continue reading
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December 4, 2011 by Mel Acheson
Dec 05, 2011 A bright star without companions challenges popular theories. Electricity comes to the rescue. The European Southern Observatory (ESO) has released this image of a “superstar,” named VFTS682. It appears reddish, but the color is attributed to the … Continue reading
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December 1, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Dec 02, 2011 Gamma-rays are said to be particles with no mass, yet possessed of extreme momentum. According to a recent press release, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected several unidentified sources of intense gamma-ray emissions that are not … Continue reading
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December 1, 2011 by Mel Acheson
    Dec 01, 2011 A nearby spiral galaxy in the southern sky looks like the Milky Way—except it is twice the size. The European Southern Observatory (ESO) has put together an image of NGC 6744, a spiral galaxy that … Continue reading
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November 29, 2011 by Scott Wall
Nov 30, 2011 Did pieces of stone really carve these holes? Rockwood Provincial Park lies alongside the Grand River in the Niagara Escarpment region of Canada. Numerous geological features are located in the park and all are attributed to glacial … Continue reading
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November 28, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Nov 29, 2011 A ring of gas is said to be orbiting the center of our galaxy. In a previous Picture of the Day, a twisted ring of material within the nucleus of Centaurus A was discussed: active galaxies display … Continue reading
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November 27, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Nov 28, 2011 Consensus opinions state that a star in the latter stages of its life will undergo violent upheavals as its supply of hydrogen fuel diminishes and the “ash” of heavier elements accumulates in its core. Before stars reach … Continue reading
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November 23, 2011 by Mel Acheson
Nov 24, 2011 Are carbonaceous asteroids the precursors of life or the wreckage of life? NASA plans to launch the Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer mission, also known as OSIRIS-REx, in 2016. The spacecraft will orbit the … Continue reading
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November 23, 2011 by Mel Acheson
Nov 23, 2011 The Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a companion galaxy to the Milky Way, is called a nursery for new stars. The growing awareness of plasma should make it also a nursery for new ideas to … Continue reading
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November 21, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Nov 22, 2011 Water has been reportedly found inside rocks brought back from the Moon. If it is there, where did it come from? In previous Picture of the Day articles, the presence of frozen water on the Moon was … Continue reading
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November 21, 2011 by Mel Acheson
Nov 21, 2011 Without a theory of electricity in space, astronomers must explain cosmic lightning with theories of falling gas. To get x-rays from falling gas, the gas must be attracted to a source of gravity with orders-of-magnitude more force … Continue reading
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November 18, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Nov 18, 2011 Do the features on Europa indicate subsurface lakes? I care not what the sailors say: All those dreadful thunder-stones, All that storm that blots the day Can but show that Heaven yawns; Great Europa played the fool … Continue reading
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November 16, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Nov 17, 2011 A thin mix of oxygen and carbon dioxide has been found above Saturn’s moon Rhea. A NASA press release states that the atmosphere on Rhea is 100 times less dense than that found on Europa by the … Continue reading
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November 15, 2011 by Mel Acheson
Nov 16, 2011 The key to modern knowledge is the exclusion of disproof and other possibilities. From the press release (emphasis added): Data from [five instruments] were combined to create the most complete spectrum of an asteroid ever assembled. This … Continue reading
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November 15, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Nov 15, 2011 MESSENGER has completed 100 orbits around the planet Mercury. In the image at the top of the page, all the characteristics of an electric discharge leaping from Mercury’s surface to space can be seen. The crater walls … Continue reading
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November 13, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Nov 14, 2011 Neptune is the Solar System’s most remote planet. What drives its extraordinary winds? The winds on Jupiter average about 400 kilometers per hour, with the fastest streaming around the Great Red Spot at 635 kilometers per hour. … Continue reading
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November 10, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Nov 11, 2011 Uranus recently erupted with a new bright region in its lower latitudes. Could electrical effects be responsible? The planet Uranus revolves around the Sun at a mean orbital radius of 2,870,990,000 kilometers, 19 times as far as … Continue reading
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November 10, 2011 by Mel Acheson
Nov 10, 2011 Victory for one theory should mean defeat for its rival. An ESO (European Southern Observatory) press releaseboasts, “Pulsating Star Mystery Solved.” Cepheid variables are stars whose rates of pulsation vary with their luminosities: the brighter the star … Continue reading
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November 8, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 09, 2011 Both Saturn’s body and its rings are so electrically active that they shine in X-ray light. “Saturn is more like the Sun than the Earth.” — Wal Thornhill Almost everyone knows that one should not look … Continue reading
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November 7, 2011 by Mel Acheson
  Nov 08, 2011 Ev Cochrane’s recent book, On Fossil Gods and Forgotten Worlds, again presents the challenge to explain an undeniable intelligibility in a large and coherent body of data. Petroglyphs, myths, and rituals around the world are composed … Continue reading
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November 7, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 07, 2011 In an Electric Universe, comets are thought to be rocks moving rapidly through the Solar System’s force fields. Comets are often called “dirty snowballs” by astronomers. However, various investigative missions, such as Giotto and Deep Impact, … Continue reading
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November 3, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 04, 2011 A new spacecraft will orbit Jupiter for over a year. On August 5, 2011 NASA launched the Juno Mission to Jupiter. After traveling out past the orbit of Mars, the spacecraft will return for a gravity … Continue reading
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November 2, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 03, 2011 Was Titan born from electrical parturition? Considering the variety of Saturn’s moons, it would be difficult to identify them as members of the same family. They vary in size, chemical composition, temperature, and appearance. However, superficial … Continue reading
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November 1, 2011 by Stephen Smith
   Nov 02, 2011 Venus has been known by several names across the ages, invoking both passion and terror. Since 1962, 22 different missions have been sent to the planet Venus. Beginning with Mariner 2, which flew by the planet, … Continue reading
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October 31, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Nov 1, 2011 Winds and shockwaves are often used to describe phenomena in the cosmos because plasma behaves in unfamiliar ways. According to a recent press release, The European Space Agency’s orbiting telescope Herschel has observed “molecular gas gusting … Continue reading
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October 30, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 31, 2011 Data from the MESSENGER probe to Mercury continues to provide evidence for the Electric Universe theory. The planet Mercury has no atmosphere and little in the way of a magnetic field, so it is bombarded by … Continue reading
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October 27, 2011 by Peter Mungo Jupp
  Oct 28, 2011 Could the Carrington Event of 1859 have had broader effects than originally assumed? Imagine your posturing self-assurance as you parade on the dockside at Port Melbourne, dressed in the finest fashions the colony of Port Phillip … Continue reading
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October 26, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Oct 27, 2011 Earth’s aurorae demonstrate the electrical connection between our planet and the Sun. The Sun unleashed another coronal mass ejection (CME) on October 22, 2011, causing an outburst of colorful displays in nighttime skies as far south as … Continue reading
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October 25, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Oct 26, 2011 Does the position of geologic strata determine age? In part one of this article, a reference to laboratory experiments that falsify the consensus view of sediment deposition mentioned that fossil ages could not be reliably determined based … Continue reading
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October 24, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Oct 25, 2011 Did the terrain we see around us take millions of years to form? Some recent experiments suggest otherwise. As mentioned in past articles, Electric Universe proponents think that something is wrong with the “long, slow” view of … Continue reading
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October 23, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 24, 2011 There are more globular clusters around the Milky Way than there ought to be. Stars form along filaments of electric current that flow through, into, and out of our galaxy. Studies of galactic magnetic fields show … Continue reading
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October 20, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 21, 2011 Cold dark matter theory might be in need of serious revision. Dark matter theory is in the news again. Although cold dark matter (CDM) gets its name from the idea that it cannot be detected with … Continue reading
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October 19, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 20, 2011 Saturn exhibits a circuit between Enceladus and its electrical environment. One of the most surprising results of the Galileo space probe’s mission to Jupiter was the identification of electrical activity between several Jovian moons and their … Continue reading
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October 18, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 19, 2011 Hayabusa’s return to Earth was delayed for more than three years. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched the Hayabusa spacecraft (Japanese for “Peregrine Falcon”) in May of 2003, after a several month delay and a … Continue reading
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October 17, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 18, 2011 What formed this unusual structure on Mars? Mars is the topic of a video from the Thunderbolts Project called The Lightning-Scarred Planet Mars. In it, Electric Universe advocate Dave Talbott explains how the Red Planet was … Continue reading
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October 16, 2011 by Mel Acheson
  Oct 17, 2011 The problem with astronomy is not that the stars are so far away or that modern instruments are expensive. The problem with astronomy is the human tendency to blink when something unexpected comes at you quickly. … Continue reading
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October 13, 2011 by Mel Acheson
  Oct 14, 2011 Redshift measurements of five galaxies verify what astronomers have always believed—if their beliefs are true. The nice thing about math is that it provides results that are absolutely true. Unless you’ve made errors in your addition, … Continue reading
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October 12, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 13, 2011 Did an atomic explosion decimate Mars long ago? According to a recent press release, a new theory claims to explain how the planet Mars acquired its red color and its tortured, barren, and desiccated landscape. According to … Continue reading
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October 11, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 12, 2011 Black hole theory contradicts itself. Most astrophysicists try to explain narrow jets erupting from various sources by using words like “nozzle” or “high pressure,” contradicting the known behavior of gases in a vacuum. For example, according … Continue reading
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October 10, 2011 by Mel Acheson
  Oct 11, 2011 Consensus astronomy proposes that thunder causes lightning. Infrared images of the “clouds” around the Cocoon Nebula reveal “networks of tangled gaseous filaments.” The filaments tend to have constant width and extend for many light-years. They appear … Continue reading
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October 9, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 10, 2011 The length of Neptune’s day has been determined. The planet Neptune is the eighth and farthest planet from the Sun. Neptune’s mean diameter is approximately 49,250 kilometers, with a mean orbital radius of 4,503,443,661 kilometers, and … Continue reading
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October 6, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 07, 2011 Lunar colonization awaits a benefit that exceeds that cost. A recent Picture of the Day article discussed the new GRAIL mission to the Moon. Two satellites will orbit the Moon together, with a range-finding system that … Continue reading
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October 5, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 06, 2011 Converging radial filaments indicate an interstellar Birkeland current “pinching down” into an hourglass shape. According to a recent press release, the longest lasting gamma-ray source ever recorded has been found by the Swift satellite’s Burst Alert … Continue reading
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October 4, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 5, 2011 The Milky Way is connected to the rest of the Universe. According to a recent press release, astronomers have found “…evidence for the cosmic thread that connects us to the vast expanse of the Universe.” By … Continue reading
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October 3, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 04, 2011 What drives star formation in various nebulae? Australian astronomer Colin Stanley Gum compiled an extensive catalog of nebulae before his death in 1960. A Study of Diffuse Southern H-alpha Nebulae comprises 85 images that reveal intense … Continue reading
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October 2, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Oct 03, 2011 Is there, or has there ever been, life on the Red Planet? A new mission will try to find out. On a morning between November 25 and December 18, 2011 NASA will launch the Mars Science … Continue reading
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September 29, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Sep 30, 2011 A new mission to map the gravity field of the Moon. On September 10, 2011 NASA launched the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) satellites on a mission to the Moon. GRAIL-A and GRAIL-B are nearly identical … Continue reading
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September 28, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Sep 29, 2011 Are there dark matter galaxies orbiting the Milky Way? Sometimes, clues can be hidden in plain site. The key to solving a particular puzzle might simply be clouded by a layer of presumptions that obscure its true … Continue reading
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September 27, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 28, 2011 A recent close encounter with Titan uncovered more surface anomalies on the haze-shrouded moon. On October 15, 1997 NASA launched the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft atop a Titan IV-Centaur rocket. The six ton payload was the largest deep … Continue reading
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September 26, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Sep 27, 2011 Do so-called “accretion disks” around presumptive black holes generate gamma-rays? “Now it is quite clear to me that there are no solid spheres in the heavens, and those that have been devised by the authors to save … Continue reading
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September 25, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Sep 26, 2011 Comet Elenin, despite fear mongers and media hype, has vanished. Leonid Elenin discovered C/2010 X1 (subsequently named after him) on December 10, 2010. The comet reached perihelion on September 11, 2011 but does not seem to have … Continue reading
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September 22, 2011 by Stephen Smith
M101 (NGC 5457), the Pinwheel Galaxy. Image credit: Donald E. Scott Sep 23, 2011 A new supernova explosion highlights the same old gravity problems. On August 24, 2011 astronomers from the Palomar Transient Factory discovered the first type 1A supernova … Continue reading
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September 21, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 22, 2011 Some stars are said to be surrounded by haloes of hot water mixed with carbon dust. According to a recent European Space Agency (ESA) press release, the Herschel infrared space observatory discovered a cloud of hot … Continue reading
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September 20, 2011 by Mel Acheson
  Sep 21, 2011 Were the myths and legends of ancient peoples entertaining fantasies comparable with Harry Potter stories? Or were they efforts to make sense of the world, comparable to the Big Bang and evolution? Or were they e) … Continue reading
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September 19, 2011 by Rens van der Sluijs
Sep 20, 2011 The previous Picture of the Day described several of the many myths that refer to a celestial chain of arrows or a celestial ladder. It asked, how is this theme to be explained? A significant pointer is … Continue reading
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September 18, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 19, 2011 The telescope that was once thought to be canceled has escaped mothballs and is on track for launch. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), formerly The Next Generation Telescope, is scheduled to be launched sometime in … Continue reading
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September 15, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 15, 2011 Vesta is confirming Electric Universe ideas about planetary scarring. Vesta appears to have experienced some powerful forces. Several craters more than 50 kilometers in diameter mar its surface. Near Vesta’s south pole is a particularly large … Continue reading
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September 14, 2011 by Rens van der Sluijs
  Sep 15, 2011 The mythical landscape is replete with structures alien to the familiar terrestrial environment today. The term “anomaly” is hardly appropriate for such forms, as it falsely suggests that they constitute a minority. Instead, it would be … Continue reading
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September 13, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 14, 2011 Dark mode plasma phenomena exist on the Sun. The image at the top of the page is the most detailed ever taken of the Sun’s chromosphere. The smallest features are 130 kilometers in size. Each spicule … Continue reading
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September 12, 2011 by Rens van der Sluijs
  Sep 13, 2011 The central challenge in comparative mythology is to account for the many similarities between traditions from different cultures and ages. This task is all the more daunting in cases where the pertinent cultures are not known … Continue reading
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September 12, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Sep 12, 2011 Elongated craters on the Moon are said to come from “grazing impactors.” In one of the earliest Pictures of the Day by the late Amy Acheson, the question was asked, how do you make a crater? When … Continue reading
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September 9, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Sep 09, 2011 The MESSENGER space probe is confirming the Electric Universe theory. MESSENGER entered orbit around Mercury on March 17, 2011 after traveling nearly eight billion kilometers. Since that time, it has sent hundreds of close-up images of the … Continue reading
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September 9, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 08, 2011 Lightning discharges in the atmosphere are familiar, but what about the ones underground? The electrical phenomenon we call lightning is not well understood. The most common interpretation involves the circulation of water vapor up and down … Continue reading
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September 7, 2011 by Stephen Smith
Sep 07, 2011 A star becomes a diamond? A recent press release announced the “discovery” of a planet in orbit around a pulsar that is thought to have once been a star, but is now a planetary body composed of … Continue reading
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September 6, 2011 by Rens van der Sluijs
Sep 06, 2011 Leibniz’ beloved adage that natura non facit saltus or ‘nature does not make leaps’ has had to endure a fair amount of comeuppances since it gained currency. An arresting example today of our unpredictable world is the … Continue reading
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September 4, 2011 by Stephen Smith
  Sep 05, 2011 The so-called “god particle” is most likely an illusion. The idea of a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was originally proposed early in the 1980s. Since the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) was at the end of … Continue reading

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