Mars - Electric Atmosphere

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Mars Antisymmetry

Unread postby fulvio » Mon Jun 30, 2008 6:22 am

Come to think of it, the Earth is similarly antisymmetric. Our south pole is capped with a land mass while the north pole is in the middle of an ocean surrounded by land masses. One one side of the Earth, the Atlantic ocean is flanked by the Americas on one side and Eurasia/Africa on the other, with the land masses narrowing southward. Exactly opposite the North Atlantic lies Australia, flanked on either side by oceans narrowing northward.

So what about plate tectonics and Pangaea? Earths continents have outlines that seem to fit into each other like a jigsaw puzzle suggesting that there was once a single land mass. How does this sit with what you've said about the Earths' antisymmetry?
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Re: Mars Antisymmetry

Unread postby nick c » Mon Jun 30, 2008 6:45 am

Comparison of Mars' polar asymmetry with other celestial bodies:
http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/COSPAR02 ... -01392.pdf

And on Earth... the "arctic muck:"
CARDONA:
THE ARCTIC CARNAGE
Meanwhile, does not this scenario, involving a tornado of
planetary proportions, raise even more demands? . . . we are all
acquainted with the destructive force that tornadoes exhibit.
Should not Saturn's Rankine vortex, therefore, have left signs of
an even greater destruction? This would have been especially so
since this titanic maelstrom would have wrought its devastation
while laterally standing still.

A full exposition concerning the history of the axis mundi
requires a volume [by itself]. . . . I point to . . . the Arctic
muck, or frozen soil, which 'covers no less than one seventh of
the land surface of earth,' all of which encircles the Arctic
Ocean and lies within the Arctic Circle. Composed mainly of silt,
sand, pebbles, and boulders, it is often accompanied by
'preserved, semi-decayed, or fully decayed vegetable and animal
matter.' Its depth, in some places, 'has always caused even the
most open-minded geologists to boggle.' The Russians, who have
conducted prolonged studies on this muck, have in some places
drilled down to more than 4000 feet without reaching rock bottom.
Entire forests have been found buried in this area, including
plum trees complete with their leaves and fruits, to say nothing
of palm trees and huge exotic ferns. . . . animals [have been]
found buried in this muck, the most noteworthy and famous of
which, needless to say, is the mammoth.
Let's face it, as George
Gaylord Simpson was astute enough to realize, catastrophic events
at the end of the Pleistocene were not only much more severe in
North than in South America, they also affected a much larger
proportion of animals.

http://www.kronia.com/thoth/ThotIV02.txt

color emphasis added


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Re: Mars Antisymmetry

Unread postby Krackonis » Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:43 am

Grey Cloud wrote:
Mars was held below Saturn for a few thousand years at least. Mars lost 3 kms of it's northern surface when that occured. It took thousands of years but the connection points to that current are the Anode blisters we call Olympus Mons and it's kin.

Surely that is pure suppostion?

The Earth was being held at the north pole. The Canadian Shield would have been solid where those Islands are now, and over the course of 5000 or so years they were hit by stupendous mega lightening, carving the islands and fjords we see today.

Ditto. This also raises the question as to why Canada got islands and Scandinavia got the fjords.


Well... I wouldn't say supposition. In the new paradigm, they are the Anode Blisters of a stupendous charge from Saturn, above it. The leopard skin over the shoulder of many tribes in Africa is indicative of Mar's appearance. Likely the reason for chest or face mutilation as well. The smooth upper half, the pocked lower half and the scar from it's run in with Jupiter.

I can reason that Canada got Islands is that the strike's footprint was just west of Greenland, North of Quebec, on land. But the water boiling off caused steam and water rushed in to fill the missing mass. The arc's likely reached to Scandinavia and cut the coastline and made a few islands as it shifted every now and then, but a sustained hit through a mass of the Canadian shield carved a multitude of islands, but likely these islands were not so at the time. The islands were under water due to the tidal forces pulling so much water upwards. (This is why the sea levels were lower in the recent past, more so around the equator, why the 'flood washed over' and why it rained for 40 days straight after the 'Clash of the Titan's' or 'Jupiter and Saturn have a close encounter'..)

So yeah, supposition there ;P
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Re: Mars Antisymmetry

Unread postby Krackonis » Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:45 am

redeye wrote:
Maybe the question could be what was first, the distorted magnetic field or the topographical anti-symmetry?


That picture intrigued me. It seems to me to show that the magnetic field is being generated at the surface rather than somewhere in the core (or I could be jumping to wrong conclusions...again), which in turn makes me think of the Sun and Birkelands Terrella.

I would say the removal of the Northern hemispheric crust distorted the magnetic field.

Cheers!


I concur. But then we have to question what cause the surface to be magnetized? Perhaps a High Silicate Content, Quartz?
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Re: Mars Antisymmetry

Unread postby Krackonis » Mon Jun 30, 2008 9:04 am

fulvio wrote:
Come to think of it, the Earth is similarly antisymmetric. Our south pole is capped with a land mass while the north pole is in the middle of an ocean surrounded by land masses. One one side of the Earth, the Atlantic ocean is flanked by the Americas on one side and Eurasia/Africa on the other, with the land masses narrowing southward. Exactly opposite the North Atlantic lies Australia, flanked on either side by oceans narrowing northward.

So what about plate tectonics and Pangaea? Earths continents have outlines that seem to fit into each other like a jigsaw puzzle suggesting that there was once a single land mass. How does this sit with what you've said about the Earths' antisymmetry?


Well, firstly, you can look at concretions and other large stone balls and deduce how they were formed in the new Paradigm. As all balls are produced in similar fashions we should see similarities.

We see in large sandstone concretions they are pieces of prestratified terrain that has been apparently, lifted into the air, carved into a sphere and dropped back to earth. Some possess a hollow core, most do not.

We see in large geodes they have been completely melted and the inside gases completely ionized and began to crystalize. Some have a flat edge where it apparently hit the ground and the vapors inside cooled differently than the rest. However, many seem to show polar symmetry. A top divit, a bottom protrusion and almost a cylinder of material wrapped around it. A Geode then is a molten ball of plasma that cooled the outside first and the crystals formed as it fell, some continuing to form after it hit the ground.

We also see a mixture. We see Several smaller balls or molten ironlike metals form seperately, then are brought together and pinched into a larger ball. This whole thing is then covered in silicates and dropped to the ground. Some breaking open, showing some spaces between the smushed balls.

So... Lets look at those as planets. The Sandstone one appears to be akin to Mars. No real magnetic field and it's metals seem to be on the surface... Not alot of basalt.

Earth seems to be the last one. We have continents, with ridges in the middle of all the oceans in between. If there were spaces in the earth they would have grown with time as the solar wind passed the planet causing the openings in the heart of planet to spin via inductance. That plasma would likely carve out a larger and larger niche for itself. Mercury might have a pocket like the earth, perhaps a smaller, lopsided one. This could also explain earth expansion.

This video explains the continental crustal imbalance on earth.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Om9H0Qv0LSU&feature=related


As for geode-planets... I am not sure I can say any are, with any confidence.
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Re: Mars Antisymmetry

Unread postby runaro » Mon Jun 30, 2008 5:21 pm

fulvio wrote:So what about plate tectonics and Pangaea? Earths continents have outlines that seem to fit into each other like a jigsaw puzzle suggesting that there was once a single land mass. How does this sit with what you've said about the Earths' antisymmetry?


I can play that game too: Notice that the western coast of America fits together with the western coast of Africa... upside down. Does that mean the continents were once the other way round and they drifted and turned upside down? Conjecture. Pangæa is conjecture as well.
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Holmes, where is the magnetism?

Unread postby FS3 » Mon Jun 30, 2008 6:55 pm

Gret pic, Stef

StefanR wrote:
Image
a way of depicting the surface magnetic fields on the planet to emphasize their ability to shield the surface from the solar wind. The greater the bulge, the stronger and more protective the magnetic field. Note that most of the remaining magnetic fields are in the southern hemisphere. Credit: David Brain/SSL


http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=6974#p6974

Maybe the question could be what was first, the distorted magnetic field or the topographical anti-symmetry?


I thought it would be wise to link this thread to what I posted at:
Magnetic clues from "impact" craters

...especially since I found an interesting study that links the Vredefort crater to - Mars!

At the Vredfort the magnetism has been "distorted", just like on Mars - only on a much smaller scale.

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Re: Mars Antisymmetry

Unread postby redeye » Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:34 am

At the Vredfort the magnetism has been "distorted", just like on Mars - only on a much smaller scale.


I see these crater formations, with magnetic anomolies, as an analogue of sunspots/Jupiter's red spot. They are a disruption in the magnetic surface of a planet due to an ionic flux...or perhaps the disruption is caused by a mechanical impact, although I doubt it...the spiral structure of the Vredfort structure certainly suggests some sort of electrical interaction.

This is a really interesting thread.

Cheers!
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Re: Mars Antisymmetry

Unread postby FS3 » Thu Jul 03, 2008 5:16 pm

redeye wrote:...I see these crater formations, with magnetic anomolies, as an analogue of sunspots/Jupiter's red spot. They are a disruption in the magnetic surface of a planet due to an ionic flux...or perhaps the disruption is caused by a mechanical impact, although I doubt it...the spiral structure of the Vredfort structure certainly suggests some sort of electrical interaction.

This is a really interesting thread.
Cheers!


:-)
See what I wrote at:
Jupiter finally goes "electric"!
...As I remember, the element Helium (He) has a characteristic color of near salmon pink towards the reddish when bombarded with the right amount of electricity and appropriate temperature and pressure - e.g. in a low voltage fluorescent lamp...


...and continued.
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Re: Mars Antisymmetry

Unread postby fulvio » Tue Jul 22, 2008 5:33 pm

I can play that game too: Notice that the western coast of America fits together with the western coast of Africa... upside down. Does that mean the continents were once the other way round and they drifted and turned upside down? Conjecture. Pangæa is conjecture as well.


Hi Runaro, I'm not playing a game. I read, I observe and I try to make sense of it. Seems to me that it's all conjecture.
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Phoenix Spies - and Feels - Dust Devils

Unread postby sol88 » Fri Sep 12, 2008 5:36 am

Phoenix Spies - and Feels - Dust Devils
Not only has the Phoenix Mars Lander photographed several dust devils dancing across the arctic plain this week, but sensors that monitor various atmospheric conditions around the lander detected a dip in air pressure as one of the whirlwinds passed nearby


Snip

Scientists believe the increasing difference between daytime high temperatures (about -30C) and night lows (around -90C) is the key to the formation of the dust devils


Question: Would they have magnometer on board or a ULF/ELF receiver?
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Re: Phoenix Spies - and Feels - Dust Devils

Unread postby Osmosis » Fri Sep 12, 2008 7:57 am

:o A magnetometer on Phoenix? What? Magnetic fields on Mars? What an idea! :lol:
Also, a communication receiver, which is a $500 module, could tell them something about plasma effects near the lander. Careful, we don't want to know what's behind the door! :shock:
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Re: Phoenix Spies - and Feels - Dust Devils

Unread postby substance » Fri Sep 12, 2008 9:30 am

I had similar thoughts, when I heard that phoenix went looking for water, but actually has no instrument capable of detecting carbon based life leftovers or even real life forms. Same case with a simple magnetometer. Not everything has to be uber expensive and advanced. People at University of Arizona made some strange choices.
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Re: Aurora on Mars

Unread postby StefanR » Wed Nov 12, 2008 4:26 pm

Mars Express radar reveals complex structure in ionosphere of Mars

30 November 2005
MARSIS, the radar on board ESA's Mars Express, has performed its first sounding of the Martian ionosphere – the upper part of the atmosphere – and found a number of unexpected features.

MARSIS has been collecting ionospheric data, mostly during Martian day-time observations, since this summer. Radio signals emitted by the radar are reflected in the form of echoes when they encounter a region of the ionosphere where the natural frequency of the plasma – the gas of charged particles that composes the ionosphere - matches that of the radar.

MARSIS scientists have discovered the presence of a number of unexpected hyperbola-shaped oblique echoes, facing downwards. These are different from the vertical echoes normally expected from the upper interface of the ionosphere.

By comparing the MARSIS map of these echoes with maps of the Martian crustal magnetic field from Mars Global Surveyor's data, scientists noted that the ionospheric areas from which the oblique echoes are generated correspond to areas of strong magnetic fields in the crust of the planet.

MARSIS is sensitive to the magnetic fields in a totally different and unexpected way. The pulses of radar energy excite the thin plasma in the local vicinity of the spacecraft and the resulting signals oscillate at a frequency dependent on the magnetic field strength. In this way MARSIS is adding to the data about the crustal magnetic fields obtained by other spacecraft.
Image

Other unexpected echoes have also been recorded by MARSIS. For example, unusual reflections recorded in the night-side of Mars that would be impossible in a horizontally stratified atmosphere, may indicate the presence of low density 'holes' in the ionosphere, like those observed in the night-side of Venus.

MARSIS measurements so far also allowed a good preliminary description of the way the ionosphere reacts when the solar activity, and the consequent bombardment of charged particles, increase. For instance, this is observed when some surface reflections during the ionospheric probing vary in intensity following solar flares, such as those that occurred on 7 and 15 September this year.
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Results_from_Mars_Express_and_Huygens/SEMB4UULWFE_0.html
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Re: Aurora on Mars

Unread postby seasmith » Tue Nov 18, 2008 7:04 pm

Mars w/o the Bars


Gamma-Ray Evidence Suggests Ancient Mars Had Oceans


18.11.2008
An international team of scientists who analyzed data from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer onboard NASA's Mars Odyssey reports new evidence for the controversial idea that oceans once covered about a third of ancient Mars.


"We compared Gamma Ray Spectrometer data on potassium, thorium and iron above and below a shoreline believed to mark an ancient ocean that covered a third of Mars' surface, and an inner shoreline believed to mark a younger, smaller ocean," said University of Arizona planetary geologist James M. Dohm, who led the international investigation.


The younger, inner shoreline is evidence that an ocean about 10 times the size of the Mediterranean Sea, or about the size of North America, existed on the northern plains of Mars a few billion years ago. The larger, more ancient shoreline that covered a third of Mars held an ocean about 20 times the size of the Mediterranean, the researchers estimate.


IMAGES FOR DOWNLOAD:
http://images.uanews.org/dohm_fig1.jpg
http://images.uanews.org/dohm_fig2.jpg

http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/physics_astronomy/gamma_ray_evidence_suggests_ancient_mars_oceans_122566.html
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