Mercury Updates

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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GaryN
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Re: Mercury Updates

Unread post by GaryN » Wed Mar 21, 2012 12:29 pm

As with our Moon, the polar regions of Mercury seem to have been subject to much more activity than the rest of the planet. Why would this be if it was from impacts? Unfortunately, and I see no expalanation as to why, what I would think would be the most telling evidence for electrical activity, at the very centre of the poles, is not available. Maybe there is a big hole there? Very large hi-res files available. See if you can spot the 'crater' that is so perfectly round, it looks almost artificial.
Image
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/the_mission/mosaics.html
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller

seasmith
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Re: Mercury Updates

Unread post by seasmith » Wed Mar 21, 2012 5:23 pm

Mercury Gets a Dose of Extra Iron
Mercury Gets a Dose of Extra Iron
by Richard A. Kerr on 21 March 2012
A new layer in the cake. A thick layer of solid iron sulfide may extend Mercury's iron core.
Credit: NASA/JHU Applied Physics Lab/Carnegie Institution


Co
mbined to give the most likely picture of Mercury's interior, the gravity and orbital data point to plenty of iron for the planet. By the team's figuring, the core extends 2030 kilometers from the center of Mercury, or 83% of the planetary radius; Earth's core is only 55% the size of the whole planet.
And the team sees another, unexpected place iron may be stored. The data suggest a mass concentration in a layer surrounding the core. Considering the chemistry of iron and its minerals and the geochemistry of Mercury's surface as determined by MESSENGER, it is plausible that, when Mercury was forming, iron and sulfur combined and froze out of the molten core, floated to the core top, and formed a solid iron-sulfide layer tens of kilometers to 200 kilometers thick. That would leave the planet with a rocky rind as little as 200 kilometers thick
.
but the layer of electrically conducting iron sulfide partially screens out and weakens the field before it reaches the surface.
http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2 ... 37973c471c

The Aten
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Re: Mercury Updates

Unread post by The Aten » Thu Mar 22, 2012 1:54 pm

Taken from the 'Mercury Gets a Dose of Extra Iron.'

Quote:

"Team members on the MESSENGER mission orbiting Mercury—with some help from Earth-based radar scientists—are reporting that Mercury's iron core is even larger than had been previously thought."


"That would leave the planet with a rocky rind as little as 200 kilometers thick."

I have been predicting this for some time, here only recently.
http://www.grahamhancock.com/phorum/rea ... eply_46601

Gary Gilligan quote:

"I'm looking forward to the many 'surprises' the 'iron core' planet Mercury will throw up, such as its outer rocky shell will be found to be far thinner than expected."


To take this one step further, I would suggest the "200 kilometers thick" is incorrect and should be more like 50 or so kilometers if that.

In predicting the above I reasoned Mercury’s shell cannot be that thick due to its recent birth through Mars' Valles Marineris (same diameter as Mercury). Mercury's outer shell consists largely of debris from Mars, which has accumulated over the relatively short period of only 2,700 years. This would be the very same debris that once hazed the sun red exactly as depicted by the ancient Egyptians. Mercury shows signs of unusual ‘magnetic’ properties having once been the dynamo of Mars.

I understand many of you dismiss the ‘iron core’ Mercury from Mars out of hand. May I politely suggest you reconsider.

Gg

The Aten
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Mercury - a loose cannon?

Unread post by The Aten » Tue Apr 03, 2012 7:52 am

Recent studies have shown that Mercury consists largely of iron.

http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2 ... 37973c471c

The latest calculations reveal 83% iron (core) with a very thin outer rocky mantle -- this being a very large step up from the previous estimation of 40%.

Now, setting aside my belief that Mercury was once the iron core of Mars and future data will reveal that the 83% is actually more like 95%, I would like to discuss the effects of the solar wind on such a highly 'conductive' body, and what possible future mercury may hold.

As follows...

Given the conductivity of iron and the fact that Mercury is essentially an iron planet (and should be termed as such), what would happen if a mega, mega coronal mass ejection (CME) blasted mercury head-on? Would it be enough to destabilise its already elliptical orbit? What if Mercury lined up with the planets Venus, earth, mars and Jupiter (or perhaps just Jupiter) and was then was blasted by a mega CME? Would this be enough to send mercury wandering, or would it have little effect?

We may further ask is it mealy a coincidence that mercury is where it is because of its more magnetic properties i.e. a conductive metal ball orbiting right next to our electromagnetic sun? If so, then isn't it more likely that one day mercury will fall into the sun, causing chaos and littering the solar system with iron debris?

Some planetary scientists propose one day Mercury will either fall into the sun or be slung out of the solar system, possible even crashing into one of the planets (inc. earth) on route. Such a model is of course loosely based on gravity and the nonsensical 'billions of years' in the future scenario. Given my stance that the last 5,000 years have seen at least 3,500 years plus of planetary chaos, I'm not so sure mercury may be the harbinger of some bad times ahead (please note, I am not into the 2012 doomsday garbage or stuff like that), but I could be wrong.

Gg

Sparky
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Re: Mercury - a loose cannon?

Unread post by Sparky » Tue Apr 03, 2012 12:37 pm

my belief that Mercury was once the iron core of Mars
how could Mars lose it's core and remain a planet? :?

If Mercury is composed of that much iron, then it is more likely to be a large chunk of whatever process that created the iron asteroids.
It may be a captured comet?? :?:

Mercury hitting the sun would be more like a mosquito hitting a bug zapper, wouldn't it? :?
"It is dangerous to be right in matters where established men are wrong."
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The Aten
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Re: Mercury - a loose cannon?

Unread post by The Aten » Thu Apr 05, 2012 3:47 am

Sparky wrote:how could Mars lose it's core and remain a planet? :?
A brief order of events.

Mars enters into encounters with earth locking into a geosynchronous orbit above the Trans-Himalayas (thus raising them). Ackermann proposes a lop-sided earth/mars dumbbell configuration with the north pole of Mars pointing towards earth. This sees countless tons of material blasted off Mars' northern hemisphere creating the North Polar Basin, the flat relatively crater-free topography observed today. In what I can only describe as an describe as a electromagnetic event (or a simple case of magnets) the larger 'magnet' of earth pulls on the smaller magnet of Mars extracting it through the Martian mantle forming the enormous great chasm the Valles Marineris (same diameter as Mercury) - Mercury is born.

Evidence for earth's core pulled towards the east?

"Lopsided Growth at the Earth's Core."
http://www.physorg.com/news191053615.html

The above link promotes the idea that earth's core is growing in favour of the east today. I think they are incorrect and what we are seeing here is the legacy of the time when Mars sat above the Himalayas pulling on earth's metallic core.

For a brief period a second golden sun is born... Mercury.

The evidence on earth is in plain sight for all to see for as Mercury exits Mars countless tons of iron rich molten rock from around Mars' core becomes vaporised (as you would expect). This cools, solidifies and falls to earth, to not only form the 'iron rich' sandy deserts such as the Sahara (plus the middle East, and the entire Asian continent) but also the iron rich sand beaches (sand washed up from the sea) around the globe. The varying 'qualities' of sand (Saharan sand said to be some of the finest in the world) as a result of varying solidifying rates and compositions (some sand has metal inclusions). An analogy, rain and the varying sizes of water droplets that fall to earth. It is no coincidence that the 'sand scar' fans out west from the direction of the Himalayas.

See here http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2010/ ... sahara.htm

The legacy of the Mercury from Mars event is still ongoing. This is evidenced by the fact that each year tons of iron micrometeorites (in addition to sand and larger iron/nickel meteors and stones) are still falling to earth!

How to collect micrometeorites (I've done this in my own back yard).

Just hose off your roof and sample the water from your downspout. Sift the sediment with a neodymium magnet to find iron micrometeorites.
http://www.solarviews.com/eng/edu/micromet.htm
http://www.stevespangler.com/science-ex ... meteorites
http://icecube.wisc.edu/icecube/static/ ... orites.pdf

Isn't this exactly what we would expect to find given the aftermath of the Mercury/Mars scenario? Small bits of iron, sand and debris still falling to earth as a result of recent planetary chaos.

Included in the link below is Saharan sand under a microscope (scroll down).
Some jagged particles have metallic inclusions, some round (again, as you would expect)
http://vixra.org/pdf/1102.0022v1.pdf

Given the above I would ask why can't Mars remain a planet after giving birth to its core? Especially when taking into account the theory that earth apparently survived after a catastrophic collision with a mars sized body resulting in the formation of the moon (not that i believe this moon origin). Do attracting 'magnets' play no part in an EU?

Sparky wrote:If Mercury is composed of that much iron, then it is more likely to be a large chunk of whatever process that created the iron asteroids.
It may be a captured comet?? :?:
What process would that be?

Along the lines of chemical fractionation (heavier elements sinking to the core of a planet or body) it is believed iron meteorites originate from the metallic cores of asteroids or planets.

"The relatively rare iron meteorites and also the pallasites presumably represent the disaggregated cores of former planetary bodies."
http://www.imca.cc/mars/martian-meteorites.htm

Mercury amounts to an iron planet with a silicate rind -- this had led some scientists to suggest Mercury once had a thick rocky mantle that was blasted off by a catastrophic collision with a smaller body (how did it survive?). In other words Mercury was once the iron/nickel core of a much larger planet. This very theory is featured in the following documentary.

'Catastrophes that Changed the Planets'
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZVw4vnaHFo

It a pity they don't look at mars a little more closely and use a little basic reasoning and logic. Inasmuch, Mars once had a working dynamo generating a protective magnetic field. This, it is believed, shut down due to a series catastrophic events. How does that work? What catastrophic events? What sort of catastrophic event would it take to dismantle earth's iron dynamo?

Mars is now a frozen desolate orb with an enormous surface scar, the Valles Marineris.
Mercury's diameter just happens to be the same size as this scar and was once the solid iron core of a planet -- why don't we just put the two together? i.e. pop mercury back into its shell, spin it up again, and hey presto we can all move back to Mars again :D
Sparky wrote:Mercury hitting the sun would be more like a mosquito hitting a bug zapper, wouldn't it? :?
Is that it?

No electrical exchange, no mega CMEs generated as a result of Mercury moving closer and closer to the sun. What of the sungrazing comets that are believed to cause CMEs (as featured on at least two TPOD)? Comets are a speck of dust compared to the iron planet Mercury and yet they can generate CMEs that can directly affect earth. I would imagine if mercury did fall into the sun the event would be far more catastrophic and prolonged that a single 'zap' as you suggest. I'm just wondering if its metallic properties would play more of a part here.

Incidentally, some have suggested an 'iron sun.' What if the iron signature has been read incorrectly and what we're seeing is the very same iron debris that falls to earth daily is also falling into the sun?

Gg

Sparky
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Re: Mercury - a loose cannon?

Unread post by Sparky » Thu Apr 05, 2012 9:04 am

the larger 'magnet' of earth pulls on the smaller magnet of Mars extracting it through the Martian mantle forming the enormous great chasm the Valles Marineris (same diameter as Mercury) - Mercury is born.------
Good point...i have never heard that theory..
Sparky wrote:If Mercury is composed of that much iron, then it is more likely to be a large chunk of whatever process that created the iron asteroids.
It may be a captured comet?? :?:
What process would that be?

Along the lines of chemical fractionation (heavier elements sinking to the core of a planet or body) it is believed iron meteorites originate from the metallic cores of asteroids or planets.
well, there you go....If Mercury came from Mars, then the sand and other bits of iron were part of that process.
I would imagine if mercury did fall into the sun the event would be far more catastrophic and prolonged that a single 'zap' as you suggest.
Hmmmmm, you are probably correct...maybe a ZAP! with extreme prejudice!! ;)

Thanks for the clear and detailed answers to my questions...I had not seen these theories about Mercury. What you say makes sense. But it is hard for me to imagine these events. I have difficulty understanding the Sun, while watching videos of it.. :?
"It is dangerous to be right in matters where established men are wrong."
"Doubt is not an agreeable condition, but certainty is an absurd one."
"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire

The Aten
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Re: Mercury - a loose cannon?

Unread post by The Aten » Sat Apr 07, 2012 4:14 am

Sparky

Your comments are appreciated, although I am surprised you'd not heard of the mercury-mars scenario.

As you would expect there is so much more to this.

In his book 'The Iron Age of Mars' prof. Alfred de Grazia embraces the idea and suggests the 'Iron Age' was a direct result of iron debris falling from the sky. http://ironageofmars.metron-publication ... index.html. Sounds logical should such an event had occurred.

Gg

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PersianPaladin
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Re: Mercury - a loose cannon?

Unread post by PersianPaladin » Mon May 07, 2012 5:51 am

Don't EU theorists question the technique that they used to "find" the nature of the planet's core?
By precisely measuring the orbital movements of MESSENGER using the subtle Doppler frequency shifts of its radio signal, geodesist David Smith of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge and 16 colleagues measured how the pull of gravity varies across Mercury, as the team reports online today in Science. Those gravity variations, in turn, depend on where inside Mercury its mass is concentrated.
Isn't such a technique based on the belief that gravity is a function of matter bending space? Is that really science? And do we really understand what "gravity" is and what constitutes "mass"?

gocrew
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Mercury's Moment of Inertia

Unread post by gocrew » Mon Jul 30, 2012 9:25 pm

I have looked for Mercury's moment of inertia online and found two different values. I don't know why this would be, unless one was estimated before what was to have been its actual measurement, and one was the actual measurement.

At any rate, Thornhill predicted a moment of inertia of nearly 0.4, while NASA was predicting below .38, I believe. Both values I have found are well below .38. Does anyone know more about this? Was this an incorrect prediction for Thornhill? Are there problems with the measurement? If the measurement is correct, what does this say about the idea that Mercury and Luna are brother planets ejected from Jupiter?

Thank you.

gocrew
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Re: Mercury's Moment of Inertia

Unread post by gocrew » Thu Aug 02, 2012 9:37 am

Anybody?

seasmith
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Re: Mercury Updates

Unread post by seasmith » Tue Nov 27, 2012 6:10 pm

@
NASA Hosts Nov. 29 News Conference About Mercury Polar Regions

http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2012/no ... rence.html

beekeeper
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Mercury rising

Unread post by beekeeper » Thu Nov 29, 2012 9:02 pm

According to the Messenger satellite Mercure likely has ice layers in the North and South poles. www.nasa.gov The temperature of Mercury hovers beteen 350C in days and 170C at night. Water ice is a very long shot at these tempertures. A picture of a crater believed to be covered with reflective ice is shown in the web site. It does have a reflecting surface along with the central peak associated with electrical discharge generally accepted for crater formation and proposed by the electric univers theory. From this perspective I imagine that it could be the product of a recent electrical interaction between mercury and another celestial body and that the reflextion is merely the glassy surface left by the cosmic lightning strike. Or water ice, like on the moon poles...
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Chai Wallah
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Nasa probe reveals Mercury has ice & organic materials

Unread post by Chai Wallah » Fri Nov 30, 2012 4:07 am

Checking for spelling mistakes is the last refuge of the Skeptic.

beekeeper
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Re: Mercury rising

Unread post by beekeeper » Sat Dec 01, 2012 7:40 am

greetings When one studies the mosaic pictures of the South and North poles of Mercury put up by Nasa, the bright side of the craters is on one side on the east side of the picture and on the other side on the west side of the picture. The pictures composing the mosaics have obviously been taken at different times possibly weeks or months apart. for the shadows to move from one side of the crater to the other would mean that the sun has access to at least 80% of the surface of the crater. We all know the intensity of the heat from the sun on the fiery planet. Am I missing something or are they...
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