Electric Moon

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Electrostatic Spin

Unread postby Solar » Sat Apr 17, 2010 5:00 am

Siggy_G wrote:Excellent papers! Just further confirmation of the electrical processes that's going on. We keep seeing that solar wind/plasma and the photoelectric effect are being driving forces. One could also wonder if the frontside and backside charge difference have a global effect on the movement of planets... In a way the two would cancel eachother out, but maybe the processes have inertia that causes rotational movements. There was an article in another thread that pointed to lunar storms (dust ejections etc.) along the night/day border of the moon due to the charge differences (can't find the link right now).

Aren't these papers just yet another confirmation that craters and alleys are caused by electrical discharges - especially on planets/moons/comets with little atmosphere (or before they got a denser one)?


That's what I wondered and the thought was familiar. See: Electrostatic Spin also known as Electrostatic Rotation

Then I remember where I heard the concept:

This physicist [Harold Aspden] had already addressed the existence of the 'Electrostatic rotation' (when a direct current voltage is applied to three metal spheres suspended without friction, the spheres begin to rotate) in 1960 and again in 1977, described as 'aether spin' induced by electrostatic charge [3], before its discovery was announced by the University of California in April 2003 [4] (note that this phenomenon could not be explained by available theory at the time of its discovery).- User:Abd/Cold fusion controversy


Harold Aspden commenting on the 2003 "discovery: "BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES THE STRUGGLE FOR ACCEPTANCE"

Funny how you can mention one word and your theory is greeted with silence until someone else "discovers" it (just being fair). Anyways, with regard to the original topic and the possibility of global electrostatic rotation add an irregular EDM'd surface i.e. "craters".

Hmmm....
"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden
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Re: Moon Juice

Unread postby MGmirkin » Sat Apr 17, 2010 3:18 pm

Siggy_G wrote:There was an article in another thread that pointed to lunar storms (dust ejections etc.) along the night/day border of the moon due to the charge differences (can't find the link right now).


(Moon Fountains)
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sc ... fountains/

(Crackling Planets)
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sc ... crackling/

(Moon Storms)
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sc ... oonstorms/

I assume these ones I proffered long ago are the ones you refer to? :ugeek:

Mind? :D Steel Trap? :shock: Wha-aa? :o j/k, mostly...

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"The purpose of science is to investigate the unexplained, not to explain the uninvestigated." ~Dr. Stephen Rorke
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Re: Polar Moon Craters Electrified?

Unread postby mharratsc » Sun Apr 18, 2010 3:27 pm

Hey, you guys want to hear why our moon is negatively charged?

Since electrons are over 1,000 times lighter than ions, the lighter electrons in the solar wind rush into a lunar crater or valley ahead of the heavy ions, creating a negatively charged region inside the crater. The ions eventually catch up, but rain into the crater at consistently lower concentrations than that of the electrons. This imbalance in the crater makes the inside walls and floor acquire a negative electric charge.


Humanity has been SO wrong about physics all these years... thank goodness these guys did this article to set us on the right path! :lol:

My guess is- Science Daily has fired their space sciences editor in an attempt to control rising costs... or something. o.O

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Re: Polar Moon Craters Electrified?

Unread postby Ronanov » Wed Apr 21, 2010 1:51 pm

Found this image, allegedly from a russiun probe:
Crator formation2.jpg

remarkable similarity between 'lunar fountain and a plasma focus (at left).

I say 'allegedly' because the image is very fuzzy and I found the image here: http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=70700&page=5

Could crater formation happen slowly in a non-glow mode plasma, gently transplanting dust from the center to the rim, rather than a more catastrophic 'zap' event?

Just musing!
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Re: Polar Moon Craters Electrified?

Unread postby Dotini » Wed Apr 21, 2010 3:26 pm

That is indeed a very poor picture.

A better one is found on page 45 of Exploring Space With a Camera, NASA SP-168. It's from the Soviet probe Zond III on July 20th, 1965 at an altitude of 11,570km. The dark area is Mare Orientale. I'm looking at it now. Some have interpreted it as showing a dome on the moon. The electrical discharge explanation makes a lot of sense.
http://history.nasa.gov/SP-168/p45a.jpg
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Re: Polar Moon Craters Electrified?

Unread postby StefanR » Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:15 am

Image
Figure 1. Surveyor image of the western lunar horizon shortly after sunset. The white arrow is pointing at a layer of dust levitated ~ 1 meter above the surface.

http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=8012#p8012
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.
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Re: Polar Moon Craters Electrified?

Unread postby Siggy_G » Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:55 am



Another great find! Some further interesting links among the comments at the bottom of the article.

"In a nutshell, what we're finding is that the polar craters are very unusual electrical environments, and in particular there can be large surface charging at the bottom of these craters," said William Farrell from Goddard Space Flight Center, lead author of a new research on the Moon's environment.


We're getting there :)
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Re: Polar Moon Craters Electrified?

Unread postby Ronanov » Fri Apr 30, 2010 4:23 pm

Moon fountains:
"On reaching an obstruction, light electrons and heavy ions in the wind should spread apart at different rates, producing a negatively charged "electron cloud" that charges up the surface to create repulsive electrostatic forces, which in turn could loft dust."
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn1 ... ommentForm

Surely:
sovedome1.jpg
sovedome1.jpg (10.42 KiB) Viewed 14538 times
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Re: Polar Moon Craters Electrified?

Unread postby Birkeland » Thu May 27, 2010 7:08 am

Static electricity lurking in moon craters, just waiting to zap astronauts:

Aviation Week, May 26, 2010

When NASA discovered water frozen in the dark bottom of a south pole lunar crater last year, it renewed visions of astronauts one day supporting habitats with resources mined from the Moon’s surface. But a computer study of the strange effects the solar wind creates as it blows unimpeded across the Moon raises another vision—one of hundreds of volts of static electricity lurking in potentially resource-rich craters just waiting to zap an astronaut.

Findings by NASA’s Lunar Science Institute indicate that before man or machine can safely enter lunar polar craters for scientific or practical purposes —such as extracting water or minerals —the agency will have to master ways for them to be grounded.

Solar Wind Poses Hazards On Moon
"The hardest thing to explain is the glaringly evident which everybody had decided not to see" - Ayn Rand
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Is our Moon getting SMALLER?

Unread postby FS3 » Fri Aug 20, 2010 11:31 am

Today an interesting paper was published in Science.

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images reveal previously undetected lobate thrust-fault scarps and associated meter-scale secondary tectonic landforms.

In short: Our Moon is shrinking - lately by about 100 meters.

From the EU point of view this might be a crucical hint as gravity couldn't be the cause of the ongoing contraction necessarily, moreover -- additionally -- our Moon is moving away from us -- though altering a delicate equilibrium between existing forces.

Gravity can't make this up as a gravitational imbalance in a connected system by bound rotation wouldn't cause a shrinking of a "massive" body -- especially not if the Moon moves farther out in the gravitational field of the Earth.

If a celestical body holds his shape and trajectory by balancing surrounding EM-forces through the area of his surface (remember: the bigger the surface the more current density can be "managed" - or vice versa: if the current density of the surrounding plasma declines, the surface could adapt by shrinking) the new finding could be a clue for further research in that direction.

Moreover this could point towards an hollow Moon -- leaving all calculations based on Keplers "Laws" almost meaningless -- and another egg in the faces of the "Standartians".

Even weirder it would be (at least for the mainstream-science) if our Moon would be returning again...

This turns out to be interesting.

:mrgreen:
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Re: Is our Moon getting SMALLER?

Unread postby nick c » Fri Aug 20, 2010 2:20 pm

hi FS3,
That is very interesting.
Do you have a link for that?

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Re: Is our Moon getting SMALLER?

Unread postby FS3 » Fri Aug 20, 2010 2:34 pm

Hi Nick,

the link to the original is in my post above (science-mag).

Here's another:

http://newsdesk.si.edu/releases/incredi ... ce-orbiter

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Re: Is our Moon getting SMALLER?

Unread postby nick c » Fri Aug 20, 2010 3:02 pm

FS3,
My apologies! I did not see the (blue) link to Science.
Let's see where are my glasses?
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Re: Is our Moon getting SMALLER?

Unread postby mharratsc » Wed Aug 25, 2010 10:47 am

Very very interesting! Let's hope this stays in the spotlight and they don't embargo info on this subject in the coming months...
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