mini craters - malta geology

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mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby MattEU » Sat Jul 17, 2010 6:02 pm

Image
manikata countryside (near Golden Bay) mini crater


the island of malta has a lot of electric universe geology and one of the most interesting of these are the mini craters. malta is a small island so these mini craters will be close to other gEUlogy events but the 2 main areas are found near much larger EU craters. it seems to show that they are related or were formed there because it is an EU energy point.


Image
Bahrija (Bahria) and malta geology includes these limestone mini craters


these maltese mini craters seem to be formed in certain categories or variations. some look like mini craters, others look like bowls.


Image Image
wilpena pound crater variations on a scale and a theme?

a few look like a smaller version and variation of wilpena pound in australia.


Image
wilpena pound australia

is it a scalable thing? if the energy had remained would these mini craters have increased in size to be similar to wilpena pound?


Image
triangle craters or birth of rock? hunts impact theorem?


one of the more interesting variations are those that form a triangle or V. with the larger and thicker ones looking like the star trek symbol. they seem to progress in stages that you can follow or put together.

starting with a couple of lines like a V they then get thicker and the middle fills up. sometimes you get a mini crater or depression in the middle. is this one of the birth of rock processes? are they all birth of rock and none of them are mini craters?

did each shape variation have a different formation process and trigger event?


Image Image
white tower marfa near little armier bay - craterland - plasma arc pitting?


there are a lot more photos and more information about Malta's mini craters here
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby Sparky » Sat Jul 24, 2010 1:36 pm

What strange formations!...Where is closest volcano?
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby seasmith » Sat Jul 24, 2010 2:01 pm

Hexagonal and dendritic signatures

Volcanic Activity at Kilauea

Image

Or fire and water following a similar electric bias ?



http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Natura ... 37&src=nha

s
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby Sparky » Sat Jul 24, 2010 2:28 pm

After a quick study of these formations and info about malta, i would lean toward natural limestone formations created when islands were submerged, then eroded when exposed.

There is also the possibility that the concrete the early people used for construction was used to create some of these to emulate the natural formations.

As for electrical discharge patterns, i don't know what limestone would do, shatter or melt, but that would be my last guess.

I would be interested in hearing from a real geologist who has spent a bit of time looking and testing these structures.
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Sat Jul 24, 2010 3:14 pm

Sparky wrote:After a quick study of these formations and info about malta, i would lean toward natural limestone formations created when islands were submerged, then eroded when exposed.

There is also the possibility that the concrete the early people used for construction was used to create some of these to emulate the natural formations.

As for electrical discharge patterns, i don't know what limestone would do, shatter or melt, but that would be my last guess.

I would be interested in hearing from a real geologist who has spent a bit of time looking and testing these structures.
Then why not go to a library, read up on the subject and report back.
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby Sparky » Sun Jul 25, 2010 11:49 am

Grey Cloud wrote:
Sparky wrote:After a quick study of these formations and info about malta, i would lean toward natural limestone formations created when islands were submerged, then eroded when exposed.

There is also the possibility that the concrete the early people used for construction was used to create some of these to emulate the natural formations.

As for electrical discharge patterns, i don't know what limestone would do, shatter or melt, but that would be my last guess.

I would be interested in hearing from a real geologist who has spent a bit of time looking and testing these structures.


Then why not go to a library, read up on the subject and report back.


Interest is not that strong....do you have a problem with that?!

thank you...
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby CTJG 1986 » Sun Jul 25, 2010 12:55 pm

Sparky wrote:
Grey Cloud wrote:
Sparky wrote:After a quick study of these formations and info about malta, i would lean toward natural limestone formations created when islands were submerged, then eroded when exposed.

There is also the possibility that the concrete the early people used for construction was used to create some of these to emulate the natural formations.

As for electrical discharge patterns, i don't know what limestone would do, shatter or melt, but that would be my last guess.

I would be interested in hearing from a real geologist who has spent a bit of time looking and testing these structures.


Then why not go to a library, read up on the subject and report back.


Interest is not that strong....do you have a problem with that?!

thank you...


I have no problem with asking questions, but I have a question for you:

Do you think a 'real geologist' has nothing better to do than take time to answer your questions on an internet forum when the answers could easily be attained by you with a simple trip to the library and a little time with a book or two, or possibly as little as a few minutes skimming online databases for the answers?

I like asking questions that have to do with hard to find or understand 'answers', but I'm sure the questions you have could be very easily discovered on your own in very short time period and with quite a small amount of effort.

Of course there may be a geologist on here who can and is willing to answer your questions, but even so such behavior of simply asking the 'expert' for his opinion rather than researching for your self is part of the problem with the academic and scientific cultures today.

When in doubt ask an expert, even if the answers are right in front of you to be discovered for yourself.

Anyways, I do think there may a be few members around here who might 'have a problem' with that as you say, but I doubt it's a major issue for them just a petty annoyance at worst.

I'm sure someone here is willing to provide an answer, though they may not qualify as a 'real geologist' by your standards if you simply mean 'with PHD'.

Jonny
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Sun Jul 25, 2010 1:05 pm

Hello Sparky: I'm a fake geologist. I have seen limestone that appears melted.

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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby Sparky » Sun Jul 25, 2010 1:41 pm

starbiter wrote:Hello Sparky: I'm a fake geologist. I have seen limestone that appears melted.

michael



Thanks....i have seen similar formations somewhere, but can't remember where...would like to find out if these cups have a bottom or are tubes..
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby MattEU » Sun Jul 25, 2010 2:47 pm

Sparky wrote:After a quick study of these formations and info about malta, i would lean toward natural limestone formations created when islands were submerged, then eroded when exposed.

There is also the possibility that the concrete the early people used for construction was used to create some of these to emulate the natural formations.

As for electrical discharge patterns, i don't know what limestone would do, shatter or melt, but that would be my last guess.

I would be interested in hearing from a real geologist who has spent a bit of time looking and testing these structures.


i have asked about these and other formations elsewhere and geology people have answered that it is erosion. when i ask how erosion formed these examples i get the answer erosion. after explaining that i would like an answer as to how erosion created each of these formations and many others on malta i get the answer erosion.

erosion seems to be the geologists answer to everything unexplainable in a gravity universe, perhaps we should start to call it dark erosion?

although i believe this to be EU formations i am not against them being "erosion" or more gravity universe natural, i just need an actual explanation as to how they were formed naturally.

there are things on malta that are perhaps more man made using torba than EU, the lines on pembroke hill for example that i have shown before. but why would these mini craters or whatever shapes you want to call them be man made? i have never seen formations like these mini craters anywhere else so not sure what man was imitating if they formed them.

the created naturally underwater then eroded when exposed idea does not make sense to me at the moment but i am happy to discuss why and how this is possible. the only way an idea, either mine or the opposite, can be shown to be true is if it is challenged. infact all ideas and theories must be challenged.

what formed these shapes underwater? why have they remained when they are limestone the same as the rest of the island? why are they not much taller? all these odd formations are only a few feet at the most above the rest of the island. none seem to ever be over a meter taller than the limestone around it. even the special grey rock lines only have a very thin covering of the grey, inside they are limestone.

Sparky wrote:Thanks....i have seen similar formations somewhere, but can't remember where...would like to find out if these cups have a bottom or are tubes..


thats a good question - all of these mini craters, starting rocks or whatever they are have a bottom, they are indeed bowl shaped. most bottoms are above or level with the floor. i would like to find out what is below one of them but the rocks they are found in are rock hard, like it has been tranformed by an event ... they are found around the island where you would expect to find them if you look at geology from an Electric Universe point of view. in fact the way i find them is by doing exactly that and it has never failed yet. i am starting to post more of my gEUlogy findings over the coming months and you will see that these are not the only examples.

you would also be amazed at how sharp this limestone can be, considering according to geologist it has to be very old. also they all look fairly new and have very little sign of "erosion" if they came up from the sea floor. are they fairly new as malta has legends from the 1300-1500 AD of immense events, especially the malta "tempest" of 23rd November 1343 that created Il-Maqluba and Filfla according to local folklore.
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hexagonal shapes in nature and the powergon

Unread postby MattEU » Sun Jul 25, 2010 2:56 pm

seasmith wrote:Hexagonal and dendritic signatures

Volcanic Activity at Kilauea

Image

Or fire and water following a similar electric bias ?



http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Natura ... 37&src=nha

s


immense :)

i will have to remember to see if any of these craters are hexagonal shape. a few of the larger things seen in malta have rough hexagonal shapes or angled side. the very puzzling and "out of this world" (for a limestone island) JohnPeel crystal rock near surfside sliema is one example. also the fried clay area where you find the outdoor stalagmites is roughly hexagonal.

does anyone know of any other features, that are not craters or the shapes seen in the planets atmospheres, that are hexagonal?

it appears to be a real powergon shape, i even remember watching a nature documentary where sea creatures made nest in the sandy sea floor and the shape was hexagonal...
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby Sparky » Mon Jul 26, 2010 1:14 pm

mattEU, "-but why would these mini craters or whatever shapes you want to call them be man made?"

these are indeed strange formations...if any are manufactured my guesses
for doing so would be associated with (1)religion...people make weird things for all sorts of weird reasons....or (2)maybe in their concrete production the limestone was ground down onto itself, resulting in a ever deepening hallow..the removal of limestone around the grinding bowl elevated it and erosion did the rest...

i can see what looks like erosion, but as you said, that does not explain everything.

the smooth interior appears to be cast, or polished out...

How would plasma make such a smooth interior, with a buildup of material around the edges? And then the whole structure elevated above the surrounding terrain?..the plasma i am familiar with leaves a messy , irregular hole....lasers can burn a neat hole, and water jets can cut a clean line in rock...these bowls appear to be polished, much as stone against stone.

very strange formations!...but any conclusion as to their cause without demonstrating that it can be done that way can't be supported..
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby ancientd » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:45 am

Sparky asked where the closest Volcano was and it is Stromboli in nearby Sicily . However I have examined these formations and they are noway manmade or lava driven . They are random and spread over many miles of coast. The limestone precludes a volcanic origin and in case you think they were eroded this particular limestone is extremely hard. Not at all soft or erodible even given thousands of years. Other factors to be taken into account are the presecence of shells such as abalone types that are petrified but in a rock hard fashion. These are common on the island. To me at least this demonstrates electric fossilization with a similar birth time to these formations . But this is another arguement. Surely the real issue here is apparent scaleability when you compare it to Wilpena pound in Australia . There are also other curious formations of straight raised line barrows made of similar material. These are impossible to explain using submersion and erosion as the manufacturing agent.
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby ancientd » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:52 am

One more for sparky I didn't answer. I appreciate that craters are generally fairly round when formed in the laboratory but i have seen CJ Ransom's lab experiments in metal etching and they are often quite eratic in many places. Also when using ( I think i have got it right) anode to cathode the results are pristinish whilst discharging the other way around produces eratic and drifting crater results. I think steve smith on the thunderbolts project facebook site has some useful posts on these different types of laboratory electrical machining.
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby seasmith » Wed Jul 28, 2010 7:19 am

Ed,

Surely the real issue here is apparent scaleability when you compare it to Wilpena pound in Australia . There are also other curious formations of straight raised line barrows made of similar material
.

~ Pictures please ?

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