Earth/Moon Electrical Interaction

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Another electric universe proof

Unread postby cbc » Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:51 am

I'm a new member but have been following this website for nearly a year.

I was impressed again at the predictive nature of this theory.
How blind can they be!


http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/0 ... -moon.html

Thanks for the great site!
(FMV 4-21-08: Moved new thread from EU to Planetary Science)
(FMV 4-21-08: Merged new thread with existing thread on same topic.)
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Re: Another electric universe proof

Unread postby StefanR » Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:52 am

Once more thanks for the link cbc!!! 8-)
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.
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Re: Another electric universe proof

Unread postby Solar » Sun Apr 20, 2008 11:06 am

:!: :!: :!: :D

That was refreshing.
"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden
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Re: Another electric universe proof

Unread postby Osmosis » Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:35 pm

:o But, the earth's magnetic field is still generated by the rotating core, even if it supposedly heated to a temperature far beyond the Curie temperature of iron.
It's amazing that the current in the plasma "stringy things" coming in from the big arc light, is ignored! :lol: :lol:
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Re: Electric Currents Between the Moon and Earth

Unread postby MGmirkin » Mon Apr 21, 2008 9:29 am

cbc wrote:How blind can they be?

[Strange Things Happen at Full Moon ]
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/0 ... -moon.html

[Added the title for clarity.]

Might as well post a few other links that they pointed to in the article above.

It seems they're finally taking the "Moon fountains" and "Moon storms" (mentioned previously) seriously:

(Lunar Explorers Face Moon Dust Dilemma)
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/0 ... _dust.html

(New NASA Spacecraft to Probe Moon Dust)
http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/08 ... ssion.html

(New Research into Mysterious Moon Storms)
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/0 ... torms.html

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The "P" word was used by NASA scientist

Unread postby heretic5 » Wed Apr 23, 2008 6:22 pm

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080418-strange-moon.html
offers a report about the effect of the Earth's tail on the Moon at full moon.
The phrase "plasma sheet" is used by a NASA scientist to decribe the Earth's tail.
One small step for a NASA scientist, one giant step for NASA?
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Re: Electric Currents Between the Moon and Earth

Unread postby GaryN » Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:18 pm

Am I to read into this that the formation of lunar craters could be an ongoing process and that impact craters might not even exist?
I think this adds weight to my proposal that there are active plasma events on mars, the image from Hebes Chasma for example, which to me shows ongoing plasma excavation which has reached a darker, likely metalic formation. As Mars has a minimal magnetosphere, its surface must be subject to the same charging imbalance, with surface material being sucked up and dropped as the charge dissipates on its way to the other side of the planet.

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM565R03EF_index_1.html
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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The Moon and the Magnetotail

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Wed May 14, 2008 10:40 am

Apologies if this has already been posted somewhere. It's from 17th April 2008

The Moon and the Magnetotail
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2008 ... totail.htm

Earth's magnetotail extends well beyond the orbit of the Moon and, once a month, the Moon orbits through it," says Tim Stubbs, a University of Maryland scientist working at the Goddard Space Flight Center. "This can have consequences ranging from lunar 'dust storms' to electrostatic discharges
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Re: Electric Currents Between the Moon and Earth

Unread postby nick c » Wed May 14, 2008 4:30 pm

How long before we hear the phrase "lunar dust devils?"

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Re: Electric Currents Between the Moon and Earth

Unread postby dahlenaz » Thu May 15, 2008 1:26 pm

And if I may jump in her to remind people to look at severe terrestrial weather events as a clue to a further
interactivity.

There is plenty of room in the tables assembled for the Hypersensitive Solar System presentation of 2006
and plenty of additional detail accumulated since then, as recent as last weeks activity.
found at this link. d...z http://www.cybertrails.com/~zrwoaz/poster06.html
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NASA observes 100 explosions on the moon

Unread postby JJ78 » Wed May 21, 2008 6:48 am

Hello Everyone!

I just received the following news mail from NASA:


NASA Science News for May 21, 2008
NASA astronomers have been watching the Moon to see how often meteoroids crash into the lunar surface and they've just video-recorded their 100th explosion. This surprisingly bountiful data-set allows researchers to start drawing conclusions about when, where, and how often the Moon gets hit.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2008/21may_100explosions.htm



--> looks like electric discharges to me...

Cheers!
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Re: NASA observes 100 explosions on the moon

Unread postby MGmirkin » Wed May 21, 2008 7:54 am

Cool article. :) Thanks!

A common question, says Cooke, is "how can something explode on the Moon? There's no oxygen up there."

These explosions don't require oxygen or combustion. Meteoroids hit the moon with tremendous kinetic energy, traveling 30,000 mph or faster. "At that speed, even a pebble can blast a crater several feet wide. The impact heats up rocks and soil on the lunar surface hot enough to glow like molten lava - hence the flash."

During meteor showers such as the Quadrantids or Perseids, when the Moon passes through dense streams of cometary debris, the rate of lunar flashes can go as high as one per hour. Impacts subside when the Moon exits the stream, but curiously the rate never goes to zero.

"Even when no meteor shower is active, we still see flashes," says Cooke.

[...]

"That's an important finding," says Suggs. "It means there's no time of year when the Moon is impact-free."

[...]

"The Moon is still flashing," says Suggs. Indeed, during the writing of this story, three more impacts were detected.


So, do pebbles and other space junk hitting the moon really cause explosions that "[heat] up rocks and soil on the lunar surface hot enough to glow like molten lava?"

Not saying it ain't so! Just wondering...
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Re: NASA observes 100 explosions on the moon

Unread postby bboyer » Wed May 21, 2008 8:27 am

Hmm. Interesting. This link is from the article in the original posting. http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006 ... oradic.htm.

Shooting Marbles at 16,000 mph
03.14.2007

March 14, 2007: NASA scientist Bill Cooke is shooting marbles and he's playing "keepsies." The prize won't be another player's marbles, but knowledge that will help keep astronauts safe when America returns to the Moon in the next decade.

Cooke is firing quarter-inch diameter clear shooters – Pyrex glass, to be exact – at soil rather than at other marbles. And he has to use a new one on each round because every 16,000 mph (7 km/s) shot destroys his shooter.

schultz1.jpg
(click to view larger image)
Death of a shooter. This is a real photo of a pyrex marble exploding on impact at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. Photo credit: Peter Schultz, Brown University, and NASA

"We are simulating meteoroid impacts with the lunar surface," he explains. Cooke and others in the Space Environments Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center have recorded the real thing many times. Their telescopes routinely detect explosions on the Moon when meteoroids slam into the lunar surface.

A typical flash involves "a meteoroid the size of a softball hitting the Moon at 27 km/s and exploding with as much energy as 70 kg of TNT."

"Mind you," says Cooke, "these are estimates based on a flash of light seen 400,000 km away. There's a lot of uncertainty in our calculations of speed, mass and energy. We'd like to firm up these numbers."

That's where the marbles come in....

Cooke is using the Ames Vertical Gun Range at NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA, to shoot marbles into simulated lunar soil. The firings allow him to calibrate what he sees on the Moon. His work is funded by NASA's Office of Safety and Mission Assurance.

"We measure the flash so we can figure out how much of the kinetic energy goes into light," he explained. "Once we know this luminous efficiency, as we call it, we can apply it to real meteoroids when they strike the Moon." High-speed cameras and a photometer (light meter) record the results.

The Ames Vertical Gun Range was built in the 1960s to support Project Apollo, America's first human missions to the lunar surface. The Ames gun can fire a variety of shapes and materials, even clusters of particles, at speeds from 0.5 to 7 km/s. The target chamber usually is pumped down to a vacuum, and can be partially refilled to simulate atmospheres on other worlds or comets.

crater.jpg
(click to view larger image)
Above: A 30cm-diameter crater plus spattered dust are all that's left after a test shot in the Ames Vertical Gun. Photo credit: NASA.

Equally important, the gun's barrel can be tilted to simulate impacts at seven different angles from vertical to horizontal since meteors rarely fly straight into the ground. Black powder propels the marble, and special valves capture the exhaust gases so they don't blow away the impact crater.

Cooke's experiments are being run in two rounds. The first set of 12 shots in October 2006 fired Pyrex glass balls into dust made from pumice, a volcanic rock, at up to 7 km/s. Follow-up experiments will use JSC-1a lunar simulant, one of the "true fakes" developed from terrestrial ingredients to mimic the qualities of moon soil.

Knowing the speed and mass of the projectile will let Cooke to scale the flash and estimate the energies of the softball-size meteoroids that hit the Moon at up to 72 km/s, more than six times the speed of the Ames gun. But luminous efficiency is just part of the question. A lot of the impact energy goes into shattering and melting the projectile -- the main reason for using glass rather than metal -- and then spraying debris everywhere.

gun1.jpg
(click to view larger image)
The Ames Vertical Gun Range. Photo credit: NASA

"The ejecta kicked out from an impact can travel hundreds of miles," Cooke continued. "We need to know more about that if we are going to live on the lunar surface for months at a time." Because the moon has virtually no atmosphere to slow down flying debris, particles land with the same speed that launched them from the impact site.

So you might dodge a bullet but still get caught by its shrapnel. And the question is, Are you more likely to get cut off at the ankles by debris spattered along the horizon, or hit from above by material on high, ballistic trajectories?

To gauge that danger, Cooke will measure the speed and direction of secondary particles by the sheet-laser technique. Lenses and mirrors spread a laser beam into paper-thin sheets of light so flying particles are briefly illuminated several times. The light traces then tell the size, direction, and speed of debris particles leaving an impact.

The technique requires a lot of image analysis, but it is cleaner and more accurate than the older way of hanging aluminum sheets in the chamber and counting holes.

The answers will help determine the kinds of shielding needed on exploration vehicles protecting humans where every day is for "keepsies."

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2007 ... arbles.htm
There is something beyond our mind which abides in silence within our mind. It is the supreme mystery beyond thought. Let one's mind and one's subtle body rest upon that and not rest on anything else. — Maitri Upanishad
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Re: NASA observes 100 explosions on the moon

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Wed May 21, 2008 9:00 am

Nice to know that not all scientists have lost their marbles.

The article in the first post saud:
"They're explosions caused by meteoroids hitting the Moon," explains Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). "A typical blast is about as powerful as a few hundred pounds of TNT and can be photographed easily using a backyard telescope."


So how come NASA is only seeing them now (i.e. a couple of years)? Surely there are lots of astronomers, amatuer and professional, gazing at the moon every night which decent equipment?
Last edited by Grey Cloud on Wed May 21, 2008 9:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
If I have the least bit of knowledge
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The great Way is simple
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Re: NASA observes 100 explosions on the moon

Unread postby JJ78 » Wed May 21, 2008 9:04 am

So, if we want to send people to the moon, the question is not how to protect them from meteor strikes, but how to keep them from getting zapped...

How would this be done?

btw. I actually noticed these flashes on the moon several years ago... although at that time I wasn't familiar with the EU paradigm, so I also assumed they were meteor strikes. I you think about it though (and in accordance with EU) these flashes look more like the flashes you see when rubbing different types of materials against each other in a dark room... triboelectricity...
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