Electric Nature

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Shrimp found far below the Antarctic ice

Unread postby popster1 » Thu Mar 18, 2010 7:39 pm

There are numerous examples of abundant life in areas of the ocean that are far removed from sunlight. Most of these are near geothermal vents. The organisms at the bottom of these food chain oxidise (or reduce) inorganic compounds and harness the energy released by those reactions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrothermal_vent
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electric trees

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:55 am


http://www.physorg.com/news171643486.html

You've heard about flower power. What about tree power? It turns out that it's there, in small but measurable quantities. There's enough power in trees for University of Washington researchers to run an electronic circuit, according to results to be published in an upcoming issue of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' Transactions on Nanotechnology.

----

A study last year from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that plants generate a voltage of up to 200 millivolts when one electrode is placed in a plant and the other in the surrounding soil. Those researchers have since started a company developing forest sensors that exploit this new power source.



That sounds like a bad idea, sucking the electric life force out of a tree. But hey, Im no scientist...

Anyways, don't trees look like fractal antennas?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractal_antenna

The question that needs to be asked though is, what is the origine of this current?

What thoughts do you guys have?
Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -Nikola Tesla -1934
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Re: electric trees

Unread postby starbiter » Mon Apr 12, 2010 9:14 am

Hello Mr. Amsterdam: Very interesting article. Thanks. The current in trees is probably similar to the current in animals. This is just a personal view, but the source might be the Birkeland Current Filaments extending out of M87 for 100,000 light years in opposite directions. From my EU readings, this current connects to everything in the Cosmos as a circuit. While we are alive, we are connected to the current/circuit. Theoretically, we are directly connected to the M87 currents. The Ionosphere is the Earth's connection to the circuit. How we connect to the Ionosphere escapes me. My health adviser suggests walking barefoot on dirt. Even better, salty water at the beach. Please excuse my personal musings.

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Re: electric trees

Unread postby MGmirkin » Mon Apr 12, 2010 12:04 pm

Not surprising, and I may have mentioned it before at some point. Do feel free to look up electro-horticulture... AKA, enhancing the growth of various plants by way of electric fields. Interesting to see some of the studies on it. I'm sure I've posted some links to stuff about that on the forum. Probably on the resources section of the site somewhere... Maybe in one of the "recovered" threads from the old forum, if I remember right?

Here
viewtopic.php?p=132#p132

Somewhere int he middle of this post. Search that page for 'horticulture'...

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Re: electric trees

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Tue Apr 13, 2010 2:30 am

wow, there is no limit to the EU theory....

Thanks MG Mirkin for the links...very interesting. Again, lots to read ;-)
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Re: electric trees

Unread postby MGmirkin » Tue Apr 13, 2010 10:06 am

MrAmsterdam wrote:wow, there is no limit to the EU theory....

Thanks M Gmirkin for the links...very interesting. Again, lots to read ;-)


Ohh, don't worry... Once you read everything you think there is to read, there's plenty more to keep reading. ;)

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Re: electric trees

Unread postby popster1 » Tue Apr 13, 2010 12:13 pm

When I was in high school (nearly half a century ago) a popular science fair project was to pass electric currents through tree seedlings. Current one direction stimulated growth, reversing the current retarded growth. The accepted explanation was that the current changed ion flow through the plant and the growth effect was consequential. When I was in grad school, a professor down the hall was using currents to affect the regeneration of severed limbs in salamanders. Again, ion flow was stated as the causal factor. Based on this thread, there may be another explanation. Perhaps the applied current merely complemented or negated the tree's (newt's?) own current flow?

(Thanks for starting this thread -- it brought back a lot of memories.)
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Re: electric trees

Unread postby MGmirkin » Tue Apr 13, 2010 1:04 pm

popster1 wrote:When I was in grad school, a professor down the hall was using currents to affect the regeneration of severed limbs in salamanders. Again, ion flow was stated as the causal factor.


Wouldn't happen to be Robert O. Becker, who wrote The Body Electric and Cross Currents, would it?

Good books. Particularly liked The Body Electric. I recall him talking about experiments with salamanders, etc. in the book. Cool stuff.

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Re: electric trees

Unread postby Siggy_G » Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:06 pm

Interesting, especially since it implies a relationship between electricity and "sparks of life". Here's another one, somewhat related:

Lightning Makes Mushrooms Mulitply
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/04/100409-lightning-mushrooms-japan-harvest/

(seems to also be secondary effects and explanations to the multiplying)
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Re: electric trees

Unread postby popster1 » Tue Apr 13, 2010 4:05 pm

MGmirkin wrote:Wouldn't happen to be Robert O. Becker, who wrote The Body Electric and Cross Currents, would it?

If I am recalling correctly his name was Jaffee, maybe Jaffe. I remember that the National Enquirer did a report on his research but managed to omit the fact that it only worked on salamanders. He had dozens of human amputees volunteering to be in his experiments. Kinda sad, really. :cry:
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Re: electric trees

Unread postby Adolfo Giurfa » Sat May 01, 2010 3:25 pm

This issue made me remember the following page I made, long time ago:
http://www.giurfa.com/artrees.html
It happends, usually that we observe things up-side down: For trees it is more important to get energy from above to take it downwards, that is part of the function of organic life on earth, to fill a "gap" of the vibrational scale (call it electromagnetic spectrum). This is valid for all natural phenomena, as all should follow the laws of electromagnetism. This is what Pitagoras studied, not with a cyclotron of billions of dollars but with a humble Monochord. Connections are made, always, in armonic proportions, as the perfect fifth 3:2, a figure that if 1 is divided by it, gives 0.66666....; which should replace Planck´s constant (0.66252)
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Re: electric trees

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Fri Aug 20, 2010 3:17 pm

popster1 wrote:Again, ion flow was stated as the causal factor. Based on this thread, there may be another explanation.


Amazingly I found this article

http://www.springerlink.com/content/x36113895172234r/

Effects of mild and severe soil drought on the water status of needles, chlorophyll a fluorescence, shoot electrical admittance, and concentrations of photosynthetic pigments in needles of seedlings of Picea abies (L.) Karst. were examined under controlled greenhouse conditions. Drought stress reduced shoot admittance linearly with a decrease in shoot water potential (w) and increase in water deficit (WD) and led to a decrease in concentrations of chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids. Severe water stress (shoot w=–2.4 MPa) had a negative effect on chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters including PSII activity (Fv/Fm), and the vitality index (Rfd). Variations in these parameters suggest an inhibition of the photosynthetic electron transport in spruce needles. Water stress led to a decrease in the mobility of electrolytes in tissues, which was reflected by decreased shoot electrical admittance. After re-watering for 21 days the WD in needles decreased and the shoot water potential increased. In the re-watered plants, the chloroplast function was restored and chlorophyll a fluorescence returned to a similar level as in the control plants. This improved hydraulic adjustment in the seedlings triggered a positive effect on ion flow in the tissues and increased shoot electrical admittance. We conclude that the shoot electrical admittance and photosynthetic electron transport in leaves are closely linked to changes in water status and their decrease is among the initial responses of seedlings to water stress.


So quite letterly electric trees?
Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -Nikola Tesla -1934
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animal foot prints in granite

Unread postby beekeeper » Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:07 pm

I have found what I believe are some animal prints in solid rock, on top of a small hill. I took the pictures to the local museum where I was told that they just couldn't be foot prints for the rocks they are in are many billions of years old and in these days there was no animals to speak of to leave the prints. Regardless I sent them to Mr Stephen Smith one of the I presume author of this web site and he was intrigue as I am as to how they got there. I wish I could include the pictures with this topic but somehow this web site will ot accept img images. If someone can help me get through this hurdle I will be happy to post them. I have some ideas as to how these prints got there but I will wait until more of this web site followers have seen the prints and comment on them. If some one have a way to post img pictures on this web site I would glady send him or her the pictures if the person would graciously include them with their comment. Thank you Just going fishing with this one :D :|
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Re: animal foot prints in granite

Unread postby Dotini » Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:17 pm

This belongs in the New Insights and Mad Ideas section. There have been several authors, notably Fort, Corliss, and Cremo who have extensively documented out of place artifacts. It a very challenging subject to study.

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Re: animal foot prints in granite

Unread postby starbiter » Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:21 pm

Hello Dotini: I respectfully disagree about changing the location of the thread.

Hello Beekeeper: If you Email the photo file to me i'd be glad to post it.

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