Mars - Water

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Something on Phoenix legs

Unread postby bdw000 » Sat Sep 13, 2008 7:42 am

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Re: Something on Phoenix legs

Unread postby substance » Sat Sep 13, 2008 10:12 am

Interesting phenomenon. Their explanation of a frozen condensation is pretty dumb, since they proved that it`s a pretty dry area. On the other hand I cannot think of any EU relation. I guess it might actually be nothing, just some stuff that got there while Phoenix was landing.
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Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby substance » Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:08 am

Hey, am I the only one here thinking that Phoenix mission was a total waste of $325M, that could have been put to better use? I was greatly excited before this mission and followed it it with a gradually decreasing interest. Now that Phoenix is shut down forever and drifts into the marsian winter, I cannot think of a single thing of any significance that we learned from this mission! At least something that is worth actually going there. What do you guys think on this subject?
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Re: Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby Drethon » Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:21 am

I'm not sure if it was worth the price but to me what we learned is how to put down a lander without any parachutes or anything other than landing jets.

Maybe next time we can land something bigger with a nuclear reactor and a few rovers to do some real work...
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Re: Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby Osmosis » Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:42 am

It would have been better to spend a few million on some "dustbusters" for the rovers. :( :( :(
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Re: Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby substance » Thu Nov 13, 2008 10:11 am

Drethon wrote:I'm not sure if it was worth the price but to me what we learned is how to put down a lander without any parachutes or anything other than landing jets.

Maybe next time we can land something bigger with a nuclear reactor and a few rovers to do some real work...

Good luck with that! I can see that you are not familiar with the prices of even small nuclear reactors ;)
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Re: Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby junglelord » Thu Nov 13, 2008 10:14 am

I think Phoenix was a complete success myself.
Its sad to see it end.
:cry:

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Re: Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby saturnine » Fri Nov 14, 2008 3:26 am

Wonder why they couldn't have had it go into a hibernate mode during the winter months?
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Re: Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby substance » Sat Nov 15, 2008 10:45 am

saturnine wrote:Wonder why they couldn't have had it go into a hibernate mode during the winter months?

Wouldn`t winter cold damage the solar panels? They might crack maybe.
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Re: Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby redeye » Sat Nov 15, 2008 11:42 am

Wonder why they couldn't have had it go into a hibernate mode during the winter months?


It's going to get buried under a few metres of carbon dioxide ice apparently.

I'm not sure if it was worth the price but to me what we learned is how to put down a lander without any parachutes or anything other than landing jets.


This is a good point, we're slowly getting better and better at landing these probes on Mars despite the tenuous atmosphere. Although it was a combination of landing jets and then parachutes assisted by landing jets, I think.

Cheers!
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Re: Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby redeye » Sat Nov 15, 2008 11:57 am

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Mile-thick glaciers found on Mars-well a 1/2 mile actually !

Unread postby WhiteLight » Fri Nov 21, 2008 6:23 am

Mile-thick glaciers found on Mars ... er a 1/2 mile actually !

Huge glaciers up to half a mile thick have been discovered close to the equator of Mars and are thought to be the remnants of an ice age on the planet.

The glaciers are thought to have been formed up to 100 million years ago and are the “most dramatic” evidence yet of climate change on Mars.

Hundreds of glaciers have been identified by researchers using ground-penetrating radar that allows them to see through a rocky layer of debris covering the ice.

The biggest of the glaciers are up to 13 miles long and more than 60 miles wide and represent a potential source of water for astronauts on missions to Mars. When they formed, the climate on Mars was much colder because the tilt of the axis on which the planet spins was much greater than it is now. This allowed ice sheets to extend far beyond the polar regions and towards, possibly even reaching, the Equator.

Dr James Head, of Brown University in the United States, said: “The tilt of Mars’s spin axis sometimes gets much greater than it is now, and climate modeling tells us that ice sheets could cover mid-latitude regions of Mars during those high-tilt periods.”

The glaciers were found between 60 and 30 degrees of latitude in the southern hemisphere and a similar band is thought to hold even greater quantities of ice in the northern hemisphere.

Dr Jack Holt, of the University of Texas at Austin, in the US, said: “It’s the most dramatic evidence for climate change on Mars. There’s been a fair amount in the past but this is by far the most dramatic.

He added: “If we can understand how climate works on Mars and how it changes, perhaps it can tell us a bit about Earth’s climate.

“There are many of these glaciers, hundreds of them scattered at these latitudes. It does add up to a lot of ice and increases the known water budget on Mars.

“These glaciers almost certainly represent the largest reservoir of water ice on Mars that’s not in the polar caps. In addition to their scientific value, they could be a source of water to support future exploration of Mars.”

The glaciers were identified in the Hellas Basin region using ground-penetrating radar equipment on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft which was able to reveal what was beneath a layer of rocky debris estimated at 10 metres deep.

The blanket of rocks over the glaciers, one of which was calculated to be the size of Los Angeles, hid the ice from view but at the same time it protected it from vapourising.

Researchers involved in the study, published in the journal Science, believe the glaciers are likely to contain a frozen record of the Martian climate several million years ago.

“The ice should preserve some of the atmospheric chemistry in the planet’s past and provide us with a window on what the environment and climate was like,” said Dr Holt.

full article Times online

****************************************************************************************************************************************

I do wonder why the headline says a mile thick and the article says a half mile thick ?
Journalists are a strange breed of exaggerators. :lol:

However beyond the journalistic creativeness this is very interesting . And it adds to my bewilderment as to why NASA in particular sends its Mars Rovers to such BORING places .

I am desperate to see a Rover approach say Olympus Mons , can you imagine how spectacular it would be ? Becoming ever larger as the Rover got closer until it TOTALLY dominated the vista.
Cheers WhightLight :geek:
"Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality"
Nikola Tesla, Modern Mechanics and Inventions, July, 1934.
Fast forward 74Yrs->yawn! :)
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Re: Phoenix - a complete failure?

Unread postby Xuxalina Rihhia » Sat Nov 22, 2008 9:07 am

It will be a few yards of fluffy water ice, but next to no CO2 ice. There were pictures of mud and even liquid
from the Phoenix lander. What I wanted was HONESTY from the NASAboyz, instead of more Big Lies from them!
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Buried Glaciers on Mars

Unread postby tholden » Sat Nov 29, 2008 2:21 am

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Re: Buried Glaciers on Mars

Unread postby moses » Sat Nov 29, 2008 2:49 pm

Ted - this is seriously interesting. Not only because it does seem quite likely
that such buried glaciers actually exist, but also that they are buried under
"protective blankets of rocky debris". Which would have happened after
Mars broke away from the Saturn System, and so represents a big interaction
with another planet, to be able to produce so much debris.
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