Galileo Galilee vs Aristotle and Ptolemy

What is a human being? What is life? Can science give us reliable answers to such questions? The electricity of life. The meaning of human consciousness. Are we alone? Are the traditional contests between science and religion still relevant? Does the word "spirit" still hold meaning today?

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Re: Galileo Galilee vs Aristotle and Ptolemy

Unread postby hlg » Mon Mar 25, 2019 10:17 pm

to birgit: nope. greetings from austria...
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Re: Galileo Galilee vs Aristotle and Ptolemy

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:18 pm

Greetings, to Austria! (:

The effects of the presence and strength of an efield on
1. planet formation,
2. minerals, and
3. live tissues
is, I think, one of the most important applications of the Electric Universe model.

Here is a thread you might be interested in:
The use of electric fields in tissue engineering
by Zzyxzeven

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=15833

If you place your links there, it will revive that amazing discussion. I also have some notes from a web seminar I could add.
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
~Homer
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Re: Galileo Galilee vs Aristotle and Ptolemy

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Tue Apr 09, 2019 10:18 pm

This subject has a subheading of course, with a little history to it --

Galileo Galilee vs. Galen and Ptolemy

Galileo had been sent to university originally to study medicine. His father expected that he would be able to support the family as a doctor, and was making economies to pay for his son's education.

Galileo, however, once he began his studies, wanted to change majors (as young people often do), and devote himself to become a mathematician. His father objected, but a good friend intervened and helped convince him that Galileo would find a post at the University which would (eventually) bring a respectable income. His father, a musician, also had reasons to dislike mathematicians: the Greek rules of harmony, he felt, impeded and oppressed his ability to play music that sounded good, rather than having to conform to mathematical rules. Perhaps a bit of this grain of obstinance against Greek teachings was inherited by his son.

One of the major roles of a doctor at the time was to forecast an astrological chart for the patient, in order to consult the heavenly bodies for the chances of a recovery from illness. For this they consulted Ptolemy's treatise on astrology, the Tetrabiblos.

Other treatments included bleeding patients and handing out amulets, as Galen prescribed, to rid the body of certain humors and direct some healing forces to the patient, with charms.

This went on under Rome for centuries (& centuries). As it turned out, rickets was caused by a vitamin D deficiency in childhood, and many other diseases were caused by microorganisms, such as viruses and bacteria -- including, perhaps, cancer itself (ref Peyton Rous). But those were the Dark Ages and magic amulets remain only as superstitious objects and as occult fetishes.

It is hard to say whether Galileo simply loved the subject of mathematics or if he had already developed his distaste for Ptolemaic astrology as a young man in University, or if it was a mixture of both causes.
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
~Homer
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