Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby Metryq » Thu Jul 12, 2018 3:44 am

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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby ConsciousNutshell » Mon Nov 05, 2018 9:42 am

Hi everyone,

How do they know it is an extra-solar system object if they has just discovered it? They say it has an eccentricity
e=1.1956±0.0006 but this could only be a modeling (a supposition) {https://arxiv.org/pdf/1810.11490.pdf}. Pre-entry velocity 26 km/s? More of the same. Why is it not possible it is an object of recent creation (might be a collision between two comets or a comet and an asteroid)? Anyway, A/2017 (Oumuamua) has just 100 meters and has showed no visible coma or outgassing. It's alleged perihelion was at 0.25 UA, so let's guess its distance to Earth was 0.7 UA (100 million km). {https://www.eso.org/public/archives/releases/sciencepapers/eso1737/eso1737a.pdf}
How the hell is it possible to see a dark object that DOES NOT EVEN REACH 1 MILLIMETER THICK at that distance?? It should be easier to see the penguins on Mars or the dragons in Venus. Not to say, it looks like somebody is trying to sell something or just manipulating the herd with the extraterrestrial origin idea {https://phys.org/news/2018-11-oumuamua-extraterrestrial-solar.html}.

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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby D_Archer » Tue Nov 06, 2018 2:45 am

ConsciousNutshell wrote:Hi everyone,

How do they know it is an extra-solar system object if they has just discovered it? They say it has an eccentricity
e=1.1956±0.0006 but this could only be a modeling (a supposition) {https://arxiv.org/pdf/1810.11490.pdf}. Pre-entry velocity 26 km/s? More of the same. Why is it not possible it is an object of recent creation (might be a collision between two comets or a comet and an asteroid)? Anyway, A/2017 (Oumuamua) has just 100 meters and has showed no visible coma or outgassing. It's alleged perihelion was at 0.25 UA, so let's guess its distance to Earth was 0.7 UA (100 million km). {https://www.eso.org/public/archives/releases/sciencepapers/eso1737/eso1737a.pdf}
How the hell is it possible to see a dark object that DOES NOT EVEN REACH 1 MILLIMETER THICK at that distance?? It should be easier to see the penguins on Mars or the dragons in Venus. Not to say, it looks like somebody is trying to sell something or just manipulating the herd with the extraterrestrial origin idea {https://phys.org/news/2018-11-oumuamua-extraterrestrial-solar.html}.

Regards.


Because it reflects sunlight and our instruments see that light, yes these instruments are sensitive enough to pick up that light, the observation was made with the VLT.

The elongated shape is deduced because the object changes drastically in brightness in a period of 7 hours or so.

As for the extra stellar origin, they calculate backwards from the trajectory it has and the speed, this indicated an origin outside our solar system. Also it is very unlikely to be created in our solar system because of a collision of sorts, collisions rarely happen in space, a collision would also reduce speed and this thing is fast.

Regards,
Daniel
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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby neilwilkes » Sun Nov 25, 2018 2:48 am

This is a serious post - and the only explanation I have yet found that actually fits everything is the Alien Probe idea.
Seriously.
Here's the link to the article written by Abraham Loeb - so we are not talking about the usual Armchair experts here but someone who is highly regarded in the mainstream so this really is well worth checking out with an open mind https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1811/1811.08832.pdf

One of the highlights for me is the way it almost stealthed itself
`Oumuamua originated from a very special frame of reference, the so-called Local Standard of Rest (LSR), which is defined by averaging the random motions of all the stars in the vicinity of the Sun. Only one star in five hundred is as slow as `Oumuamua in that frame. The LSR is the ideal frame for camouflage, namely for hiding the origins of an object and avoiding its association with any particular star - since stars typically move in that frame.
The relative motion between `Oumuamua and the Sun reflects the motion of the Sun relative to the LSR. `Oumuamua is like a buoy sitting at rest on the surface of the ocean, with the Solar System running into it like a fast ship. Could there be an array of buoys that serves as a network of relay stations or road posts, defining the average Galactic frame of reference in interstellar space?


Given that even the mainstream now think that as many as 1/4 of all the stars in our own galaxy have a habitable planet orbiting.......see http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0004-637X/807/1/45/pdf....then it's not unlikely. Check the paper in the first link and read it with an open mind
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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Wed Feb 06, 2019 3:50 pm

Eugene Bagashov: Oumuamua's Strange Acceleration and Other Anomalies | Space News
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJgpFDU4dwE

soft X-rays
4:10

anomalous acceleration
6:35

Eugene Bagashov: Oumuamua Data Reveals Intriguing Possibilities | Space News
https://youtu.be/p3JhEYnsJQs?t=158

He discusses the possibility that Oumuamua was traveling in the direction of the sun's northern hemisphere, toward the "solar apex."

If so, it would not be like other comets, which acquire a negative charge way out in space, wrt the sun's atmosphere.

Instead, it would have the same charge as the sun.

Why would Oumuamua have a similar charge to the sun?

Don Scott: A Transistor Analogy of THE SUN'S SURFACE | Lecture
channel: ThunderboltsProject
dur. 53:56

https://youtu.be/JsfEG4HzWAY?t=1804
30:04
SWOOPS data from Ulysses -- see his comment on, and interpretation of, the absence of solar wind measurements at the poles

Image
What did they see at the poles?
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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby seasmith » Thu Feb 07, 2019 10:16 pm

BB wrote:
What did they see at the poles?


ESA/NASA like repeating the phrase "over the poles" and posting not-to-scale drawings, but it actually got within ~20º latitude, at a distance further out than Mars orbit.
On 13 September 1994, the joint ESA NASA Ulysses mission passed a major milestone on its journey of exploration through the third dimension of the Sun's environment, the heliosphere. Nearly four years after its launch by the Space Shuttle 'Discovery', the European-built spacecraft reached the most southerly point on its out-of-ecliptic orbit, 80.2 degrees south of the Sun's equator, at a distance of 2.3 AU (345 million km) from the Sun. Although it will take scientists many months to unravel fully the new and exciting data acquired by Ulysses, several important results have already emerged.

(for ref. Earth's Arctic circle is round about 24º latitude)

https://www.esa.int/esapub/bulletin/bullet82/mars82.htm
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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Fri Feb 08, 2019 9:24 pm

Here you go seasmith --

Image


Jupiter swing-by

It arrived at Jupiter on 8 February 1992 for a swing-by maneuver that increased its inclination to the ecliptic by 80.2 degrees. The giant planet's gravity bent the spacecraft's flight path southward and away from the ecliptic plane. This put it into a final orbit around the Sun that would take it past the Sun's north and south poles. The size and shape of the orbit were adjusted to a much smaller degree so that aphelion remained at approximately 5 AU, Jupiter's distance from the Sun, and perihelion was somewhat greater than 1 AU, the Earth's distance from the Sun. The orbital period is approximately six years.

Polar regions of the Sun
Between 1994 and 1995 it explored both the southern and northern polar regions of the Sun, respectively....ESA's Science Program Committee approved the fourth extension of the Ulysses mission to March 2009[15] thereby allowing it to operate over the Sun's poles for the third time in 2007 and 2008. After it became clear that the power output from the spacecraft's RTG would be insufficient to operate science instruments and keep the attitude control fuel, hydrazine, from freezing, instrument power sharing was initiated.


I know I used wik, but it is not bad for some things.

I will transcribe the exact quote about Ulysses from Don Scott's presentation. It is very interesting.
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby seasmith » Fri Feb 08, 2019 9:47 pm

So...
to answer your own question, what Did they see at the poles ?
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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:17 pm

HI seasmith. It is summed up here:
"My feeling is, they did get some data, and it does support our ideas. What they found was almost a curlicue spiral of current and magnetic fields both on the North and the South Pole of the Sun. And so the question always arises, 'Well, how does the sun stay positive?' Because it gets its [positive?] input from its poles as far as we can tell. We need more data, we need more probes to find it out exactly." ~Don Scott

This is related in my mind to the sunspot cycle, and if the polar current to the sun could be observed and measured, it would be the best way to predict the strength or weakness of the sunspot cycle. --Something the great majority of the solar physicists could not do. (Predicting the past cycles does not count (: )

So that would be a great improvement on the previous thermonuclear star model.

But back to Oumuamua-- if the object came down along the north, it may have maintained a positive charge wrt the outer solar system, and would not have experienced the electrical stress that a comet often does as it approaches the sun. But I favor the possibility that Oumuamua was ejected by the sun.
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:21 pm

And if you say, "Wik is wrong about that," I will not dispute it (:
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby Robertus Maximus » Sun Apr 21, 2019 11:58 am

Detection of an Interstellar Meteor

https://www.centauri-dreams.org/2019/04/17/detection-of-an-interstellar-meteor/

"Do we have a second interstellar visitor, following on the heels of the controversial ‘Oumuamua? If so, the new object is of a much different nature, as was its detection..."
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Re: Oumuamua - No discharge coma?

Unread postby Cargo » Sun Apr 21, 2019 1:54 pm

I had thought and wondered how long it would take an object traveling 50km/s to go between systems. Since they reference Proxima Centauri, I looked that up, and it is 40.14 trillion km away.

This gives a travel time of about 26,000 years. Not accounting for the galactic movement of the systems through space at all.

The odds of a small meteor exiting another system, and entering our system, are astoundingly huge. I don't believe it is very likely.
interstellar filaments conducted electricity having currents as high as 10 thousand billion amperes
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