Moon Craters

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Do you see it?

Unread postby seasmith » Sun Jun 14, 2015 8:19 pm

Daniel wrote:

seasmith wrote:
The pentagram & a-half outline?
The di-polar double-scoop in the center?
The braided-looking swirls in between?



Bingo! But what does it look like?

Regards,
Daniel


Rock ?:)☺

But seriously, the surface morphology appears to be forming at least a tri-part archetype pattern, so there’s most probably more than one model to fit it ?
An electric auger bit comes to mind …
~
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Re: Do you see it?

Unread postby D_Archer » Mon Jun 15, 2015 5:19 am

seasmith wrote:
Daniel wrote:

seasmith wrote:
The pentagram & a-half outline?
The di-polar double-scoop in the center?
The braided-looking swirls in between?



Bingo! But what does it look like?

Regards,
Daniel


Rock ?:)☺

But seriously, the surface morphology appears to be forming at least a tri-part archetype pattern, so there’s most probably more than one model to fit it ?
An electric auger bit comes to mind …
~



Not much response, i thought it was obvious. The center looks like a galaxy*, left it swirls up and right down and a central bulge in the middle. Or particle in cell simulation by Bostick, or Valles Marineris etc.

Regards,
Daniel
- Shoot Forth Thunder -
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Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby Metryq » Tue Jan 22, 2019 7:24 pm

So, is there any seismological evidence that this was a meteoroid impact during the recent lunar eclipse, or is it simply assumed? I know the EU position is that craters in the Solar system are a mix of EDM and impact, but I was thinking that an impact during the eclipse was coincidental. If EDM, then perhaps not so coincidental, as the flux across the lunar surface was changing at the time.
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Re: Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby Cargo » Wed Jan 23, 2019 10:21 pm

Since labs have spent millions of dollars shooting objects into various materials at hyper velocites in a fain attempt at understanding crater formation. I would think this moon flash recording science program would at least try to correlate some of these flashes with actual pictures of the moon surface. In order to help science understand what we are seeing.

They claim to deduce the 'mass' of all these objects which created the flashes, but I doubt that very much. In fact, n rocky object impacting another rocky object, in the Dark Vacuuumm of Space, no matter what the velocity, will NEVER produce a flash. I am very certain of that, if I ignore any plasma or electric properties. But I don't own a lab to test that, so I guess I really can't prove it.
interstellar filaments conducted electricity having currents as high as 10 thousand billion amperes
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Re: Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby The Great Dog » Thu Jan 24, 2019 1:04 pm

There are no other dogs but The Great Dog
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Re: Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby JouniJokela » Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:29 am

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Re: Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby Maol » Sun Jan 27, 2019 5:45 pm

Cargo wrote:Since labs have spent millions of dollars shooting objects into various materials at hyper velocites in a fain attempt at understanding crater formation. I would think this moon flash recording science program would at least try to correlate some of these flashes with actual pictures of the moon surface. In order to help science understand what we are seeing.

They claim to deduce the 'mass' of all these objects which created the flashes, but I doubt that very much. In fact, n rocky object impacting another rocky object, in the Dark Vacuuumm of Space, no matter what the velocity, will NEVER produce a flash. I am very certain of that, if I ignore any plasma or electric properties. But I don't own a lab to test that, so I guess I really can't prove it.

(shameless copy and paste from Wikipedia ;) )

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piezoelectricity
Piezoelectricity is the electric charge that accumulates in certain solid materials (such as crystals, certain ceramics, and biological matter such as bone, DNA and various proteins)[1] in response to applied mechanical stress.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triboelectric_effect

This is why Wintergreen flavor Life Savers flash when you chew them (in the dark).

https://gizmodo.com/incredible-slo-mo-f ... 1794839986

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tW8q_JfmcbU <--- interesting slo-mo views with hammer blows to Life Savers.
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Re: Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby Cargo » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:29 pm

What luck that all these rocks hitting the moon are some sort of crystal ceramic bone dna life savers.
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Re: Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby Maol » Mon Jan 28, 2019 8:17 pm

Cargo wrote:What luck that all these rocks hitting the moon are some sort of crystal ceramic bone dna life savers.

Sarcasm duly noted. Do you agree or disagree? EU proponents regularly express the concept that EM forces are the same in an earthly laboratory as when scaled up to universe proportions. Scale up from the speck of crystal that when struck generates the piezoelectric ignition spark in a butane lighter.
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Re: Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby Cargo » Mon Jan 28, 2019 10:42 pm

Yes, my apologies for the snark, but let's get back to science then. I have found this an interesting investigation now.

I found a paper linked by universetoday.com which provides some data points. It could be said, that there are 70,000 flash events on the Moon every year. They are extremely short in duration, 33 to 165ms. With the new dual-band NEOLIANT, they've mathed out temperatures. And from "the first ten [flashes] they detected, they obtained temperature estimates ranging from about 1,300 to 2,800 °C ( 2372 to 5072 °F)." This is approaching Red Star levels. The 'coldest' of know Stars, iirc.

They estimate as well the impactor mass to be a 100g to 55kg. This 1 mag higher then previous estimates. Speed of the impactor is basically an unknown and could be anywhere from a slow to hyper. Such is the difficulty when deducing things from a few pixels of a picture.

So of course, we only see flashes. We don't see what caused the flash, or what's leftover on the surface afterward. However if the Moon as received over a million impacts the last couple decades, I would love to see a time-lapse of the crater morphing that must be going on.

So where does the flash we are measuring come from. The paper only refers to this.
"Pioneering laboratory experiments were conducted more than 40 years ago, using dust accelerators and photomultipliers with filters at several wavelengths, allowing the estimation of the plasma temperature (Eichhorn 1975, 1976; Burchell et al. 1996a,b)."

Emphasis of course all me, because that surely makes a difference I think. As would a charged object moving through dusty space snapping tiny rocky insects out of the vacuum in a flash of light. spiz, snap, sizzle. :)

Don't get me wrong, of course impact craters occur, but I don't believe these flashes are from kinetic only impacts. Maybe I'm wrong. Until we get more then a few pixels of light, it's going to be hard to tell unless someone goes up there and get's a GoPro of it.
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Re: Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby Metryq » Tue Jan 29, 2019 5:58 am

Cargo wrote:it's going to be hard to tell unless someone goes up there and get's a GoPro of it.

I read somewhere that the laser reflector left by Apollo is the only ALSEP still functioning. If there were any working seismometers, I would expect some correlating evidence if the flashes are impacts. I suppose even an EDM event might register, but then the mainstream astronomers will be telling us the impactor was "less dense than water." A styrofoam cup impacted with such force that it registered a flash visible from Earth! Maybe it was dark matter!
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Re: Impact during lunar eclipse

Unread postby Cargo » Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:19 pm

I can't wait for the Chinese to record a picture/video from the cold dark side of the Moon. Apparently the 'dark' side has more 'impacts' then the Earth side. So they said in a recent news story about how they recorded the coldest every temperature during the 14-day Moon Night, some -300+F.
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Re: Moon Craters

Unread postby GaryN » Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:46 pm

Looking through the Apollo 15 Preliminary Science Report I found this account and I'd say it is confirmation of the electric discharge nature of many if not most of the lunar craters. I just cut these passages out and reformatted them, the full document is so large it was crashing my computer. The relevant text begins on page 5-35 of the document that can be dqwnloaded from:
https://history.nasa.gov/alsj/a15/a15psr.html

LMP at LM
The crater here that I'm standing by, Joe, it's about a meter in diameter. And then, there's a smaller crater right in the center of it, and that one has fragments around in that-that have glass exposed on them, where the the larger crater does not have any glass exposed, just the smaller crater within the large one.
CDR between LM and station 1
There's a nice little round 1-m crater with very angular fragments all over the bottom and the rims, and glass in the very center; about a meter across.
LMP at station 1
Yes, just behind you is one of those fresh craters, too, with a lot of glass in it.
...
You know, Joe, these small fresh craters that we've commented on-whatever caused them must create or indurate the soil into the rocks-creates its own-own rocks, because there's just a concentration of rocks around the very fresh ones. And the small, I'm talking about maybe a foot to 3 feet diameter.


Google has a free much higher quality scan , about 250 MB, can't find it again at them moment.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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