Earth - electric oceans

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

Moderators: MGmirkin, bboyer

Re: Ocean tides generate a magnetic field which affects ....

Unread postby seasmith » Wed Apr 11, 2018 6:02 pm

Maol wrote:..... Earth's magnetic field.

When salty ocean water flows through Earth's magnetic field, an electric current is generated, and this, in turn, induces a magnetic signal.

However, the field generated by tides is tiny and extremely difficult to measure – but Swarm has done just this in remarkable detail.


There is an interesting video in this which is an animation of the field strength variations over time.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-04-swarm-tra ... m.html#jCp

The fluctuation in Earth's overall magnetic field would have some effect on ionized matter entering Earth's field, slightly deflecting the path of ions as they enter the atmosphere, favoring some locations over others as the field fluctuations progress (as seen in the video in the link). This could affect the location of entry to the atmosphere of ionized O and H (ergo H2O) arriving with CMEs and the solar wind, therefor could affect terrestrial weather.



While the magnetic field is created largely by an ocean of superheated, swirling liquid iron in the planet's outer core, other factors, like magnetised rocks in the crust and the flow of the ocean, also affect the field.


Or is it the same causation generating both the magnetic field, and the "swirling liquid" ?
A charged mass generates its own magnetic field when it spins.

Good point about global reception being filtered, or enhanced by the field-modified atmospheres.
It's a constant interaction with the incoming radiations that ionized the atmospheres initially, but the thermionic radiation emitted by Earth probably plays a role in there somewhere as well.
Our satellites are just beginning to get a picture of just how dynamic of a system it all is.
seasmith
 
Posts: 2815
Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 6:59 pm

Re: Ocean tides generate a magnetic field which affects ....

Unread postby D_Archer » Thu Apr 12, 2018 7:20 am

What about a cosmic connection, there was a report about solar storms causing whale strandings, paper > https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/international-journal-of-astrobiology/article/solar-storms-may-trigger-sperm-whale-strandings-explanation-approaches-for-multiple-strandings-in-the-north-sea-in-2016/C70B7A535EFA936C0449C1730B647A74?_sp=a0531af2-1068-471d-bff9-7916aabd040b.1504605509577#
---
Original post GH forum:
Quote:
The Earth's atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field protects local life by shielding us against Solar particle flows, just like the sun's magnetic field deflects cosmic particle radiation. Generally, magnetic fields can affect terrestrial life such as migrating animals. Thus, terrestrial life is connected to astronomical interrelations between different magnetic fields, particle flows and radiation.

Quote:
Whales’ magnetic sense may play an important role in orientation and migration, and strandings may thus be triggered by geomagnetic storms. This approach is supported by the following: (1) disruptions of the Earth's magnetic field by Solar storms can last about 1 day and lead to short-term magnetic latitude changes corresponding to shifts of up to 460 km; (2) many of these disruptions are of a similar magnitude to more permanent geomagnetic anomalies; (3) geomagnetic anomalies in the area north of the North Sea are 50–150 km in diameter; and (4) sperm whales swim about 100 km day−1, and may thus be unable to distinguish between these phenomena.

Link to article from news desk: https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/stories/are-northern-lights-causing-whale-strandings-north-sea

Regards,
Daniel

original post link: http://grahamhancock.com/phorum/read.php?3,1115942,1115942#msg-1115942
- Shoot Forth Thunder -
User avatar
D_Archer
 
Posts: 1255
Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 4:01 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Ocean tides generate a magnetic field which affects ....

Unread postby seasmith » Sat Apr 21, 2018 8:44 pm

bi-flow

... .But with the Solar cycles, we had to track spins, since that was a magnetic effect. It already looks to me like Tides are a magnetic effect, so we will have to track spins. This is somewhat easier than it sounds, since we only have to give photons a plus/minus spin. We don't have to track spins in between. Basically, if Jupiter is on one side of the Sun and Saturn is on the other, one will be plus and the other will be minus. Direction matters. Photons moving left become antiphotons when they move right. You can then use the mechanics I spell out in my paper on Solar Cycles.

4) Since the Moon causes the primary tide, all other tides will have to be tracked relative to her. Her position sets the main line at each moment, or the line at 0 degrees.

5) The Solar tide—as carried by the Solar wind and its ions—is the secondary tide, and it will hit maxima at both 0 and 180, relative to the Moon. It will hit minima at 90 on both sides.

6) The big four planets also have to be tracked relative to the Moon, and they will hit maxima and minima in the same way. Planets on the far side of the Sun will continue to be part of the calculations, since they will add to the Solar charge, but their positions must be tracked from the position of the Sun at the time, since their charge must recycle through it.


http://milesmathis.com/tide7.pdf
seasmith
 
Posts: 2815
Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 6:59 pm

Re: Ocean tides generate a magnetic field which affects ....

Unread postby ja7tdo » Tue May 08, 2018 10:04 pm

Hi,

I wrote some articles about Earth.
There is short text about magnetic field.

https://etherealmatters.org/book/introd ... tric-earth
https://etherealmatters.org/article/oli ... -electrons

Earth's magnetic field produced by electrons in near mantle from olivine.
The rotation, the magnetic field, the earthquake, the gravity etc. all relate to each other.
ja7tdo
 
Posts: 115
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2017 7:36 am
Location: Japan

Re: Ocean tides generate a magnetic field which affects ....

Unread postby Osmosis » Wed May 09, 2018 11:57 am

This magnetic effect can be observed by setting a total-field magnetometer near the water. Wave action will easily be seen.
Osmosis
Osmosis
 
Posts: 423
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:52 pm
Location: San Jose, California

The Constant Chemistry of Seawater

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Thu Jan 17, 2019 12:54 pm

Does the chemistry of seawater remain constant for millions of years?

Here is an excellent resource on the subject for discussion:
http://oceanplasma.org/documents/chemistry.html

I am going to import some of the text in case the link gets broken.

1. Salinity is related to the concentration of dissolved salts in seawater.

In the past, salinity of seawater was measured by evaporating the water and weighing the amount of salt remaining. Since that approach is difficult and inaccurate, electrical conductivity of seawater is now used to measure salinity.

Conductivity increases as salt content of the water increases.
Conductivity gives very accurate salinity data: 35.0000X.
Conductivity (and temperature and depth) are measured by instruments called CTDs (Conductivity Temperature Depth). These instruments can make thousands of measurements/hour.
Salinity, temperature, and depth (pressure) can be used to calculate density, which is important to understanding vertical circulation of the water.
Salinity is greatest in warm, tropical surface waters, where there is more evaporation than precipitation. It is lowest where there are large inputs of freshwater from rivers.

Salinity has no units. (The PSU or "practical salinity unit" is incorrect, although frequently used.)

Salinity is approximately equal to the weight, in grams, of salt dissolved in 1000 g of seawater. This would be the salt concentration in parts per thousand (‰).
Average ocean water has a salinity of 35.0.
This means that 1000 g of average seawater contains 965 g of water and 35 g of salts.
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
~Homer
User avatar
Brigit Bara
 
Posts: 585
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 1:37 pm

Re: The Constant Chemistry of Seawater

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Thu Jan 17, 2019 12:58 pm

3. Six major ions make up >99% of the total dissolved in seawater.

They are sodium ion (Na+), chloride (Cl-), sulfate (SO42-), magnesium ion (Mg2+), calcium ion (Ca2+), and potassium ion (K+).


5. The major ions are conservative. This means that they have constant ratios, to one another and to salinity, in almost all ocean water.

Another way of saying this is that sea salts have constant composition. They almost always consist of 55% sodium ion, 31% chloride, 8% sulfate, 4% magnesium ion, 1% calcium ion, and 1% potassium ion.

The main exception is where freshwater is mixing with seawater. River water has a different composition than seawater, for example, it contains more calcium ion.


source: oceanplasma.org
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
~Homer
User avatar
Brigit Bara
 
Posts: 585
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 1:37 pm

Re: The Constant Chemistry of Seawater

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Thu Jan 17, 2019 1:01 pm

6. Sea salts mostly came from the weathering of rocks on land (the cations) and from the interior of the earth (anions).

The weathering of rock on land is a slow process of breakdown by water, with dissolved carbon dioxide, and that makes it slightly acidic.

Igneous (volcanic) rocks do not contain enough anions to be the source of mineral-laden water to the oceans. Now, sedimentary rocks are the source. In the past, volcanoes and, probably, an initial rapid release when the earth melted were the source.

Rivers carry the dissolved ions to the ocean.
Weathering may have been somewhat faster on the early earth, but even at the present rate it would take only about 8 to 260 million years to replace all the salts in seawater with those in the river inflow.
The time to replace the total amount of ions in seawater with the ions in the river inflow is called the 'residence time'.
Since this is much less than the age of the Earth and the oceans, some processes must remove the salts from seawater to keep them from building up to even higher concentration.


7. Ocean salt composition and concentration is in "steady state". This means that it does not change significantly over time.

Evidence indicates that sea salt concentration and composition has been about the same for 1.5 billion years at least. The tolerances of bacteria that probably lived 3.8 billion years before present indicate that sea salt concentration and composition were not too different, even that long ago.

The "steady state" results from the removal rate of salts from the ocean being equal to the input rate.

This balance holds because the removal rate of salts is related to their concentration, and increases when their concentration increases.

Removal processes include:

formation of evaporites (salt deposits left behind when seawater evaporates)
burial of sediment porewater (the water between sediment grains)
sediments, especially biogenic sediments, for Ca2+ (calcium ion) as calcium carbonate.
hydrothermal vents, especially formation of the mineral chlorite within the cracks and fissures of the vents, which removes Mg2+ (magnesium ion).


source: oceanplasma.org
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
~Homer
User avatar
Brigit Bara
 
Posts: 585
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 1:37 pm

Re: The Constant Chemistry of Seawater

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Thu Jan 17, 2019 1:03 pm

Also, please see and save a copy of this table.


http://oceanplasma.org/documents/Elemental_Table.jpg
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
~Homer
User avatar
Brigit Bara
 
Posts: 585
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 1:37 pm

Re: The Constant Chemistry of Seawater

Unread postby The Great Dog » Fri Jan 18, 2019 10:11 am

https://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2015/1 ... of-charge/

Sea water isn't just chemical, it's also organic.

TGD
There are no other dogs but The Great Dog
User avatar
The Great Dog
 
Posts: 247
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 4:58 pm

Re: The Constant Chemistry of Seawater

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Fri Jan 18, 2019 12:20 pm

The Great Dog wrote:https://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2015/11/23/a-sea-of-charge/

Sea water isn't just chemical, it's also organic.

TGD


Thanks Great Dog! and Kudos to Mr. Smith for the TPOD.
"I decided to believe, as you might decide to take
an aspirin: It can't hurt, and you might get better."
-- Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum (1988)
Younger Dryas
 
Posts: 109
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2015 7:28 am
Location: Toronto ON Canada

Re: The Constant Chemistry of Seawater

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:14 pm

http://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/wp-cont ... 7-1024.png
A nanoscale polysaccharide network. Credit: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vesna Svetličić, Vera Žutić, Galja Pletikapić and Tea Mišić Radić.


I am not trying to be a smart alec, but that amount of polysaccharides is quite a carbon sink :shock:

If you consider all of the trillions of marine foraminiferans going about their business every day, it is a sheer wonder that there is any co2 left at all.
“Oh for shame, how these mortals put the blame upon us gods, for they say evils come from us, when it is they rather who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given…”
~Homer
User avatar
Brigit Bara
 
Posts: 585
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 1:37 pm

Previous

Return to Electric Universe - Planetary Science

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests