Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Beyond the boundaries of established science an avalanche of exotic ideas compete for our attention. Experts tell us that these ideas should not be permitted to take up the time of working scientists, and for the most part they are surely correct. But what about the gems in the rubble pile? By what ground-rules might we bring extraordinary new possibilities to light?

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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Fri Jan 05, 2018 12:04 pm

Are sound and light not both byproducts of electricity?
"I decided to believe, as you might decide to take
an aspirin: It can't hurt, and you might get better."
-- Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum (1988)
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby jtb » Sat Jan 06, 2018 8:02 am

Younger Dryas wrote:Are sound and light not both byproducts of electricity?
We really don't know what electricity is because it's invisible, intangible, and imponderable.

Light is simply a certain resonance that when combined with the resonance of objects produces color and heat (motion). We don't see light; we see color. If our eyes could detect the resonance of light, they wouldn't be able to detect the various resonances producing color.

Sonoluminesence: star in a jar. Certain sound frequencies produce light in water. Light on a solor pannel produces electricity, and as stated below, electricity can produce light and sound.

The “motion” of electric fluid passing from cloud to cloud produces thunder and is called lightning. Lightning is the visible resonance (color) produced by the electric fluid “moving” from cloud to cloud; thunder is the sonic resonance (sound). Both are caused by “motion” of the electric fluid in an attempt to become neutral, or equalized. Moving magnets cause electric fluid to flow, and electric fluid flowing through a conductor produce magnetism. Every thing moving within a certain resonate frequency can be detected by our 5 senses: sight, sound, smell, touch, & taste.

1828 Webster's Dictionary: ELECTRIC'ITY, noun The operations of a very subtil fluid, which appears to be diffused through most bodies, remarkable for the rapidity of its motion, and one of the most powerful agents in nature. The name is given to the operations of this fluid, and to the fluid itself. As it exists in bodies, it is denominated a property of those bodies, though it may be a distinct substance, invisible, intangible and imponderable. When an electric body is rubbed with a soft dry substance, as with woolen cloth, silk or fur, it attracts or repels light substances, at a greater or less distance, according to the strength of the electric virtue; and the friction may be continued, or increased, till the electric body will emit sparks or flashes resembling fire, accompanied with a sharp sound. When the electric fluid passes from cloud to cloud, from the clouds to the earth, or from the earth to the clouds, it is called lightning, and produces thunder. Bodies which, when rubbed, exhibit this property, are called electrics or non-conductors. Bodies, which, when excited, do not exhibit this property, as water and metals, are called non-electrics or conductors, as they readily convey electricity from one body to another, at any distance, and such is the rapidity of the electric fluid in motion, that no perceptible space of time is required for its passage to any known distance.
It is doubted by modern philosophers whether electricity is a fluid or material substance. electricity according to Professor Silliman, is a power which causes repulsion and attraction between the masses of bodies under its influence; a power which causes the heterogeneous particles of bodies to separate, thus producing chimical decomposition; one of the causes of magnetism.

My conclusion is that "motion" is the cause of electricity, magnetism, light, and sound.
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Sun Jan 07, 2018 7:41 am

[/quote]We really don't know what electricity is because it's invisible, intangible, and imponderable.[/quote]

I've always found it more beneficial to see Electricity as 'Love'. You know, the kind that launches a 1000 ships, the cable tow a soldier uses to find his way home from war. I recently met a man who at 88 was willing to endure another round of cancer treatment for no other reason than his wife not having to eat dinner alone :)

I'm reminded of a scene from Interstellar:

Brand: So listen to me when I say that love isn't something that we invented. It's... observable, powerful. It has to mean something.
Cooper: Love has meaning, yes. Social utility, social bonding, child rearing...
Brand: We love people who have died. Where's the social utility in that?
Cooper: None.
Brand: Maybe it means something more - something we can't yet understand. Maybe it's some evidence, some artifact of a higher dimension that we can't consciously perceive. I'm drawn across the universe to someone I haven't seen in a decade, who I know is probably dead. Love is the one thing we're capable of perceiving that transcends dimensions of time and space. Maybe we should trust that, even if we can't understand it.


Puts a new spin on Catastrophe anyway. Perhaps something is growing us? Teaching us? Prometheus was cast out of Olympus for attempting to put us on equal footing with the Gods, by giving us Fire from Heaven. Like children our Neanderthal ancestors imitated Peratts Southern Ball Plasmoid by creating bone flutes. What comes first the dance or the song?

Image
"I decided to believe, as you might decide to take
an aspirin: It can't hurt, and you might get better."
-- Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum (1988)
Younger Dryas
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2015 7:28 am
Location: Toronto ON Canada

Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby jtb » Mon Jan 08, 2018 4:38 am

Younger Dryas wrote: What comes first the dance or the song?
Got an answer for you Younger: Desire excited by love. Webster's 1828 Dictionary: Desire, "An emotion or excitement of the mind, directed to the attainment or possession of an object from which pleasure, sensual, intellectual or spiritual, is expected; a passion excited by the love of an object, or uneasiness at the want of it, and directed to its attainment or possession." All causes begin with metaphysical (emotional) desire excited by love whose effects are experienced in the physical realm. I guess you could substitute the word "hate", or any metaphysical emotion for the word "love". I don't get out of bed without a desire initiated by either my body or my mind (or my wife's body or mind).
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Sun Jan 14, 2018 11:46 am

Yeah were still stuck somewhere between Gods and Worms - its a difficult position :)

Well now really when we go back into falling in love. And say, it's crazy. Falling. You see? We don't say "rising into love". There is in it, the idea of the fall. And it goes back, as a matter of fact, to extremely fundamental things. That there is always a curious tie at some point between the fall and the creation. Taking this ghastly risk is the condition of there being life. You see, for all life is an act of faith and an act of gamble. The moment you take a step, you do so on an act of faith because you don't really know that the floor's not going to give under your feet. The moment you take a journey, what an act of faith. The moment that you enter into any kind of human undertaking in relationship, what an act of faith. See, you've given yourself up. But this is the most powerful thing that can be done: surrender. See. And love is an act of surrender to another person. Total abandonment. I give myself to you. Take me. Do anything you like with me. See. So, that's quite mad because you see, it's letting things get out of control. All sensible people keep things in control. Watch it, watch it, watch it. Security? Vigilance Watch it. Police? Watch it. Guards? Watch it. Who's going to watch the guards? So, actually, therefore, the course of wisdom, what is really sensible, is to let go, is to commit oneself, to give oneself up and that's quite mad. So we come to the strange conclusion that in madness lies sanity. - Alan Watts

I'd say were getting off track, but its a hell of a dance. Even if were just going around in circles.
"I decided to believe, as you might decide to take
an aspirin: It can't hurt, and you might get better."
-- Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum (1988)
Younger Dryas
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2015 7:28 am
Location: Toronto ON Canada

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