Pluto, Dwarf Planets, and Kuiper Belt objects

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Pluto Watch

Unread postby viscount aero » Tue Jul 15, 2014 9:06 pm

seasmith wrote:echo planet∞id

New Horizons Only One Year from Pluto


http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sc ... pluto2015/

~

Been waiting for this. Very cool mission.
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Re: Pluto Watch

Unread postby paladin17 » Wed Jul 16, 2014 4:08 pm

Could anybody please provide a link to what the electric universe guys think about Pluto (and other adjacent bodies) and maybe what we shoud expect of this mission?
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Re: Pluto Watch

Unread postby D_Archer » Thu Jul 17, 2014 11:26 am

One of my predictions for Pluto: It will be much HOTTER then expected.

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Re: Pluto Watch

Unread postby Bomb20 » Sun Jul 20, 2014 4:32 am

Hi Paladin17,

until now I am not aware of any prediction of the Thunderbolts about Pluto but my prediction is another case of a (dwarf) planet with a niece Aurora.
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Re: Pluto Watch

Unread postby nick c » Sun Jul 20, 2014 6:23 am

I do not know of any specific EU predictions pertaining to Pluto.

Here is a TPOD: Getting To Know Pluto
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NASA looking at Pluto's interaction with plasma

Unread postby MattEU » Tue Dec 02, 2014 9:09 am

NASA has an instrument on board the New Horizons spacecraft looking at Pluto and the Suns plasma :)

New Horizons' Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument is designed to measure the interactions of Pluto and Charon with the solar wind, the high-speed stream of charged particles flowing out from the Sun. Understanding these interactions will expand our knowledge of the astrophysical processes affecting these bodies and that part of the solar system.
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˚Pluto Watch

Unread postby seasmith » Mon Dec 08, 2014 9:43 am

˚Pluto Watch

Epic Pluto encounter ahead
New Horizons will begin its Pluto science campaign in January, and will make its closest approach to Pluto in July. It will explore the outer-most and most-populated region of the solar system, the Kuiper belt, which is full of rocky, icy objects that have remained largely unchanged since the formation of the solar system.


https://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2014/0 ... 340-pluto/


http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014/12/ ... r-in-2015/
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Re: ˚Pluto Watch

Unread postby viscount aero » Mon Dec 08, 2014 3:57 pm

seasmith wrote:˚Pluto Watch

Epic Pluto encounter ahead
New Horizons will begin its Pluto science campaign in January, and will make its closest approach to Pluto in July. It will explore the outer-most and most-populated region of the solar system, the Kuiper belt, which is full of rocky, icy objects that have remained largely unchanged since the formation of the solar system.


https://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2014/0 ... 340-pluto/


http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014/12/ ... r-in-2015/


I've been looking forward to the findings to come from this. We are going to see Pluto for the first time. That's just awesome. Even at this closing distance it still isn't resolvable. That alone is amazing. It's a tiny world, smaller than the Moon, yet has its own atmosphere and satellite system.
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Re: ˚Pluto Watch

Unread postby Rossim » Mon Dec 08, 2014 7:41 pm

I predict a heavily cratered body and a significant different in appearance of the northern hemisphere compared to the southern similar to Mars' topography.
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Re: ˚Pluto Watch

Unread postby Metryq » Mon Dec 08, 2014 8:08 pm

Fans of Pluto reacted very emotionally when the body was "downgraded" from planet status. They'll be leaping off cliffs if it is further "demoted" to mere comet. Could that "atmosphere" be a coma?
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Re: ˚Pluto Watch

Unread postby Lloyd » Mon Dec 08, 2014 8:10 pm

Kuiper Belt
the Kuiper belt, which is full of rocky, icy objects that have remained largely unchanged since the formation of the solar system

Cardona says some members of the Kuiper belt show evidence of having been disturbed by something, which he thinks was the Saturn system as it was approaching the solar system.

This image shows that Pluto's orbit goes from near Uranus all the way out to the outer edge of the Kuiper belt:
http://i1-news.softpedia-static.com/images/news2/Cu-satelitul-prin-Centura-Kuiper-2.jpg

Wikipedia says:
Since it was discovered in 1992,[6] the number of known Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) has increased to over a thousand, and more than 100,000 KBOs over 100 km (62 mi) in diameter are believed to exist.[7] The Kuiper belt was initially thought to be the main repository for periodic comets, those with orbits lasting less than 200 years. However, studies since the mid-1990s have shown that the belt is dynamically stable, and that comets' true place of origin is the scattered disc, a dynamically active zone created by the outward motion of Neptune 4.5 billion years ago;[8] scattered disc objects such as Eris have extremely eccentric orbits that take them as far as 100 AU from the Sun.[nb 1]


This image shows known KBO locations as well as "scattered disk" objects:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Outersolarsystem_objectpositions_labels_comp.png

Pluto's Atmosphere
This paper says Pluto's atmosphere is getting thicker as it's getting farther from the Sun:
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2013/09051420-plutos-atmosphere-does-not-collapse.html
the last two stellar occultations whose data are included in this paper, including one on May 4 of this year, have shown that the atmosphere is not collapsing right now. In fact, it's still getting thicker, even as Pluto is moving farther from the Sun. Plugging these data points back into their climate models, Olkin and Young and their coauthors conclude that the only model that can explain the observed behavior of the atmosphere is one in which there is a permanent north polar cap. And in those models, the atmosphere never completely collapses. It waxes and it wanes, but it never collapses.
- Spectroscopic analysis of Pluto's surface reveals it to be composed of more than 98 percent nitrogen ice, with traces of methane and carbon monoxide.[77] The face of Pluto oriented toward Charon contains more methane ice, whereas the opposite face contains more nitrogen and carbon monoxide ice.[78]


Most comas seem to be composed mostly of OH, so I guess Pluto isn't a comet.
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Re: ˚Pluto Watch

Unread postby D_Archer » Tue Dec 09, 2014 5:53 am

I think i made this prediction before, i repeat it here just for the record: They will find Pluto to be warmer than expected.

Regards,
Daniel
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Re: ˚Pluto Watch

Unread postby seasmith » Tue Dec 09, 2014 6:28 pm

D_Archer wrote:

I think i made this prediction before, i repeat it here just for the record: They will find Pluto to be warmer than expected.



Daniel,
Could you give us a bit of your reasoning here ?
thanks,
s
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Re: ˚Pluto Watch

Unread postby D_Archer » Wed Dec 10, 2014 4:39 am

seasmith wrote:
D_Archer wrote:

I think i made this prediction before, i repeat it here just for the record: They will find Pluto to be warmer than expected.



Daniel,
Could you give us a bit of your reasoning here ?
thanks,
s


Pluto would receive more charge than expected, just like the "hot poles" spots predicted by Wal for Saturn. Pluto has no larger planets around and so will receive more charge (relatively) and probably also charge from outside the solar system. Pluto has a small atmosphere which could help with some charge retention. And the slow spin means the charge that it would receive does not 'spin out' at the equator that fast.

Charge is photons is heat as per Miles Mathis.

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Re: ˚Pluto Watch

Unread postby kiwi » Sat Dec 13, 2014 3:58 pm

A planet four times the size of Earth may be skirting the edges of the solar system beyond Pluto, according to new research. Too distant to be easily spotted by Earth-based telescopes, the unseen planet could be gravitationally tugging on small icy objects past Neptune, helping explain the mystery of those objects' peculiar orbits.

The claim comes from Rodney Gomes, a noted astronomer at the National Observatory of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro. Gomes presented his recently completed computer models suggesting the existence of the distant planet at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Timberline Lodge, Ore., earlier this month.

Astronomers who attended the talk find Gomes' arguments compelling, but they say much more evidence is needed before the hypothetical planet can be crowned as real.


For several years, astronomers have observed that a handful of the small icy bodies that lie in the so-called "scattered disc" beyond the orbit of the planet Neptune, including the dwarf planet Sedna, deviate from the paths around the sun that would be expected based on the gravitational pulls of all the known objects in the solar system.

Sedna, for example, swings around the sun in an extremely elongated orbit — tracing out a very long oval. "Sedna's orbit is truly peculiar," said Mike Brown, an astronomer at Caltech who led the team that discovered Sedna in 2003.

However, when Gomes ran the calculations with the addition of the gravitational pull of a massive planet at the outskirts of the solar system, Sedna and the other anomalous objects' expected orbits fell in line with observations. The unseen planet would be too far away to perceptibly perturb the motions of Earth and the other inner planets, but close enough to the scattered disc objects to sway them. [The True Stories of 5 Mystery Planets]

Unknown entity

Several planet types could fit the disturbances seen in Gomes' calculations. For example, a Neptune-size planet, about four times bigger than Earth, orbiting 140 billion miles (225 billion kilometers) away from the sun would influence the anomalous objects in the observed manner. Or, a Mars-size planet with a highly elongated orbit — but one that always keeps it well beyond the orbit of Pluto — could yield similar results. As for how it got there, the planet could have been born in and expelled from a distant star system and later captured by our sun's gravity, Gomes said, or it could have formed near our sun and gradually been thrust outward through gravitational interactions with the other planets.

Though Gomes' work has not yet been peer-reviewed, his colleagues are confident he got the math right. "[Gomes] is very good. It's hard to imagine he made a mistake in his calculations," said Hal Levison, a planetary scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo.

"Rodney Gomes is actively seeking further evidence and I await his findings with interest!" Douglas Hamilton, an astronomer at the University of Maryland, told Life's Little Mysteries. "He has taken on a difficult task, but is taking the right approach. It is definitely a high risk, high reward, situation — a discovery of a new planet would be spectacular!"

New planet or old star?

This would not be the first time a planet was revealed by way of its gravitational effects on other celestial bodies. The existence of Neptune was hypothesized at the turn of the 19th century — long before the gas giant was actually seen through a telescope in 1846 — because of the way it was perturbing the orbit of Uranus.

On the other hand, many astronomers spent much of the 1900s searching for an extra planet, dubbed Planet X, beyond the orbit of Neptune, because they believed there were anomalies in the orbits of Neptune and the other gas giants. "But it turned out that anomaly in Neptune's orbit was the result of bad observation," Levison said. The search for Planet X was called off (though some conspiracy theorists believe this was a cover up of the planet Nibiru, which they say is on a collision course for Earth.)

"You can go back 100 years to claims of planets in the outer solar system and they've all eventually gone away," he continued. "That should give you pause for thought. Just because there's not a good explanation for [the orbits of the scattered disc objects] besides another planet, doesn't mean there won't be a good explanation in future."

Brown, who discovered Sedna, said another plausible explanation for that dwarf planet's strange behavior could be that a star swung near it early in the history of our solar system, throwing it for a loop. "Back at the time of the birth of the sun, the sun probably formed in a cluster of other stars. If true, they would have been close enough together to influence each other's outer planet systems, like where Sedna is," he said.

More work is needed to determine whether Sedna and the other scattered disc objects were sent on their circuitous trips round the sun by a star that passed by long ago, or by an unseen planet that exists in the solar system right now. Finding and observing the orbits of other distant objects similar to Sedna will add more data points to astronomers' computer models. "We, and a couple of other groups of astronomers, are working hard to see if we can track some down and figure out this mystery," Brown said.

As for the putative planet itself, Levison said, "The strength of the idea that there is a planet out there will be the inability to find another explanation for these objects. But seeing it is the only way to prove it."



http://www.livescience.com/20583-planet ... ystem.html
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