abiogenesis, Acari insects, alchemy and vermin plagues

What is a human being? What is life? Can science give us reliable answers to such questions? The electricity of life. The meaning of human consciousness. Are we alone? Are the traditional contests between science and religion still relevant? Does the word "spirit" still hold meaning today?

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abiogenesis, Acari insects, alchemy and vermin plagues

Unread postby mathew » Sun Aug 28, 2011 9:57 am

http://www.rexresearch.com/crosse/crosse.htm

Introduction:
In 1837, Andrew Crosse reported to the London electrical Society concerning the accidental spontaneous generation of life in the form of Acurus genus insects while he was conducting experiments on the formation of artificial crystals by means of prolonged exposure to weak electric current. Throughout numerous strict experiments under a wide variety of conditions utterly inimical to life as we know it, the insects continued to manifest. The great Michael Faraday also reported to the Royal Institute that he had replicated the experiment. Soon afterwards, all notice of this phenomenon ceased to be reported, and the matter has not been resolved since then.



In Worlds in Collision Chapter 9, page 182, we read: "The dust of the land became lice throughout all Egypt" and that the "Amalekites left Arabia because of 'ants of the smallest kind'". And a plethora of stories, of other sorts of "loathsome vermin" plagues.

Velikovsky goes on to say, "the internal heat developed by the Earth and scorching gases of the comet , were in themselves sufficient to make the vermin of the Earth propagate at a feverish rate... Anyone who has experienced a khamsin (sirocco), an electrically charged wind blowing from the desert, knows how, during the few days that the wind blows, the ground around the village begins to teem with vermin."


Wow! an electrical connection or component to account for infestation / propagation of flies, frogs, lice...

I have posted this here, under the sub header: What is Life?
The wind.. in its greatest power, whirls. -Black Elk
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Re: abiogenesis, Acari insects, alchemy and vermin plagues

Unread postby Influx » Wed Sep 14, 2011 12:57 pm

Hi everyone, I am surprised that no one has responded. This is a very interesting subject.

I read about Andrew Crosse in a book called Fads and Fallacies in Science. I was immediately intrigued. Seemed like such a simple and easy experiment to carry out and disprove empirically, instead of trying to prove on the theoretical knowledge of what is and what is not.

Of course I am not claiming that Crosse was, is, actually right, or made a legitimate discovery, as I have no way of knowing. It could all be a massive blunder. As for the confirmation of the discovery by other scientists, well that is just it, its just words on the internet. Using the knowledge and logic that has been ingrained into me by society since childhood, I would say this is all utter nonsense and doesn’t warrant even a ounce of our time, or further discussions. And I suspect that most of the people on this forum feel the same way, otherwise it wouldn’t be so quiet in this thread.

Some thing bugged me about that story and I kept it in the back of my mind. Here is what I think now.

“Artificial life (commonly Alife or alife is a field of study and an associated art form which examine systems related to life, its processes, and its evolution through simulations using computer models, robotics, and biochemistry. The discipline was named by Christopher Langton, an American computer scientist, in 1986. There are three main kinds of alife, named for their approaches: soft, from software; hard, from hardware; and wet, from biochemistry. Artificial life imitates traditional biology by trying to recreate biological phenomena. The term "artificial life" is often used to specifically refer to soft alife.”


“The creation of synthetic life is a goal of scientists working in the fields of synthetic biology or exploring the origin of life. The term has also been used to describe recent experiments that transferred the chemically synthesized copy of a bacterial genome into a different (but closely related) bacterial host cell. However, the term Synthetic Life is usually associated to the creation of a living system "from scratch", that is from isolated building blocks. This has not yet been achieved.

These efforts are largely independent from the computational simulation of artificial life which is related to the discipline of robotics.”

“In 2010, the team of Craig Venter replaced the genome of a natural cell with a different genome created by gene synthesis creating a new bacterial strain dubbed Mycoplasma laboratorium. In press conferences, Craig Venter described this work as the creation of "Synthetic Life". This statement was widely criticized on the grounds that:
the chemically synthesized genome was an almost 1:1 copy of a naturally occurring genome and
the recipient cell was a naturally occurring bacterium
The Craig Venter Institute maintains the term "synthetic bacterial cell" but they also clarify "...we do not consider this to be “creating life from scratch” but rather we are creating new life out of already existing life using synthetic DNA"

This is us now, what kind of nanotech will we have in a hundred years? What about the past?

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=virus&rlz=1B3GGLL_enUS380US380&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&biw=1424&bih=696

Image

Look at all the viruses, see anything suspicious? Well I remember the first time I saw a picture of a virus and how much it looked like a machine, rather than a biological entity. I remember thinking back there, “Looks like a nanonite.” And then I remembered Crosse.


So here are my two cents.

We know that all stories of catastrophic disaster feature a “Golden Age”, powerful beings able to create life, The Garden of Eden.

Atlantis?

Even EU talks about a golden age.

What if the “Golden Age” civilization was more advanced than us? Wouldn't nanotech play a major role in their life. If not altogether replace their technology completely. In fact a civilization relying completely on nano technology would most likely be agrarian, with not a single factory in sight.

Then, BOOM, a massive EM event, no more civilization, the nanonites flounder for millions of years, until we found them and named them “Virus.”

We have yet to “see” a virus directly, who knows maybe it says, core i7 6980x on it.

Now, just maybe Crosse activated one of these nano fossils? Lol.

After all, wouldn't there be trillions of these “Fossils” mixed into the earth? Anyway, that is my take.

I would love to be able to reproduce Crosse's experiments. Or at least try, anyone want to give it a go?
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Re: abiogenesis, Acari insects, alchemy and vermin plagues

Unread postby moses » Wed Sep 14, 2011 4:12 pm

Perhaps a simple explanation is that the eggs of these insects could survive very difficult conditions and develop in very difficult conditions, but not do very well in ordinary conditions, so it escaped detection. I doubt that anything else is much afoot here.
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Re: abiogenesis, Acari insects, alchemy and vermin plagues

Unread postby whitenightf3 » Fri Sep 27, 2013 1:16 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwXU5hVaNKs

This is all known and explained by the Gnostics and John Lash is a very proficient Gnostic Scholar. Its all about vibration those constructing the new paradigm understand that something/life can spontaneously appear.
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Re: abiogenesis, Acari insects, alchemy and vermin plagues

Unread postby tholden » Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:51 pm

IF anything like this has ever happened, and that's a hell of a big "IF", then you still have the reality that our living world is based on information and an information code, and that the simplest one-celled organisms are vastly more complex than anything man has yet built.

What this means is that if the claim is true, then the electric current is somehow or other pulling a design pattern of some sort from the void, and fleshing it out, i.e. the electric current is somehow providing the physical capability to instantiate an example of a cosmic prototype of some sort for a living creature. The relationship would be very similar to the relationship between classes and instantiated objects in object-oriented programming languages like C++ or Java.
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Re: abiogenesis, Acari insects, alchemy and vermin plagues

Unread postby Spektralscavenger » Sun Dec 22, 2013 7:31 am

Maybe I am wasting time by paying attention to experimental blunders but well.

moses wrote:Perhaps a simple explanation is that the eggs of these insects could survive very difficult conditions and develop in very difficult conditions, but not do very well in ordinary conditions, so it escaped detection. I doubt that anything else is much afoot here.
Mo


Yes, the eggs or cells (one at least) could have been all along and the prolonged exposure to weak electric current served to hyperaccelerate their development into adult insects. Conditions were harsh but the current is like a perpetual pleasing massage. If the acarus came from the "aether", with no eggs or cells whatsoever, why were "acarus" rather than entirely new life forms? I don´t say it´s impossible but I´ll not believe that very complex life can appear de novo from only proper currents/vibrations until I actually see it.

Certainly, if insects emerged so much more microbial life emerged. Possibilities for evolution are astonishing given the lots of time, places and electric events.

Influx wrote:Hi everyone, I am surprised that no one has responded. This is a very interesting subject.

I read about Andrew Crosse in a book called Fads and Fallacies in Science. I was immediately intrigued. Seemed like such a simple and easy experiment to carry out and disprove empirically, instead of trying to prove on the theoretical knowledge of what is and what is not.

Of course I am not claiming that Crosse was, is, actually right, or made a legitimate discovery, as I have no way of knowing. It could all be a massive blunder. As for the confirmation of the discovery by other scientists, well that is just it, its just words on the internet. Using the knowledge and logic that has been ingrained into me by society since childhood, I would say this is all utter nonsense and doesn’t warrant even a ounce of our time, or further discussions. And I suspect that most of the people on this forum feel the same way, otherwise it wouldn’t be so quiet in this thread.

Some thing bugged me about that story and I kept it in the back of my mind. Here is what I think now.

“Artificial life (commonly Alife or alife is a field of study and an associated art form which examine systems related to life, its processes, and its evolution through simulations using computer models, robotics, and biochemistry. The discipline was named by Christopher Langton, an American computer scientist, in 1986. There are three main kinds of alife, named for their approaches: soft, from software; hard, from hardware; and wet, from biochemistry. Artificial life imitates traditional biology by trying to recreate biological phenomena. The term "artificial life" is often used to specifically refer to soft alife.”


“The creation of synthetic life is a goal of scientists working in the fields of synthetic biology or exploring the origin of life. The term has also been used to describe recent experiments that transferred the chemically synthesized copy of a bacterial genome into a different (but closely related) bacterial host cell. However, the term Synthetic Life is usually associated to the creation of a living system "from scratch", that is from isolated building blocks. This has not yet been achieved.

These efforts are largely independent from the computational simulation of artificial life which is related to the discipline of robotics.”

“In 2010, the team of Craig Venter replaced the genome of a natural cell with a different genome created by gene synthesis creating a new bacterial strain dubbed Mycoplasma laboratorium. In press conferences, Craig Venter described this work as the creation of "Synthetic Life". This statement was widely criticized on the grounds that:
the chemically synthesized genome was an almost 1:1 copy of a naturally occurring genome and
the recipient cell was a naturally occurring bacterium
The Craig Venter Institute maintains the term "synthetic bacterial cell" but they also clarify "...we do not consider this to be “creating life from scratch” but rather we are creating new life out of already existing life using synthetic DNA"

This is us now, what kind of nanotech will we have in a hundred years? What about the past?

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=virus&rlz=1B3GGLL_enUS380US380&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&biw=1424&bih=696

Image

Look at all the viruses, see anything suspicious? Well I remember the first time I saw a picture of a virus and how much it looked like a machine, rather than a biological entity. I remember thinking back there, “Looks like a nanonite.” And then I remembered Crosse.


So here are my two cents.

We know that all stories of catastrophic disaster feature a “Golden Age”, powerful beings able to create life, The Garden of Eden.

Atlantis?

Even EU talks about a golden age.

What if the “Golden Age” civilization was more advanced than us? Wouldn't nanotech play a major role in their life. If not altogether replace their technology completely. In fact a civilization relying completely on nano technology would most likely be agrarian, with not a single factory in sight.

Then, BOOM, a massive EM event, no more civilization, the nanonites flounder for millions of years, until we found them and named them “Virus.”

We have yet to “see” a virus directly, who knows maybe it says, core i7 6980x on it.

Now, just maybe Crosse activated one of these nano fossils? Lol.

After all, wouldn't there be trillions of these “Fossils” mixed into the earth? Anyway, that is my take.

I would love to be able to reproduce Crosse's experiments. Or at least try, anyone want to give it a go?


I think the Golden Age civilization was more "superspiritual" than supertechnological. Their most adavanced tech, if any, were "free energy" devices and electrogravitic propulsion.
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Re: abiogenesis, Acari insects, alchemy and vermin plagues

Unread postby Spektralscavenger » Tue Nov 25, 2014 5:09 am

If this general kind of thing is possible imagine in the turmoil. Plasma discharge and boom!!! Lifeforms materialize straight from the subtle patterns of the Aether. Underline "subtle patterns", for not only the "materialization" doesn´t create any matter_ rather condenses_ but no information is created as well (at most mutated), all the information was there already.
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