Bacteria wave forms

What is a human being? What is life? Can science give us reliable answers to such questions? The electricity of life. The meaning of human consciousness. Are we alone? Are the traditional contests between science and religion still relevant? Does the word "spirit" still hold meaning today?

Moderators: MGmirkin, bboyer

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby flyingcloud » Sun Dec 05, 2010 10:06 pm

Interspecies Electron Transfer: Anaerobic Bacteria Found to Cooperate

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 141914.htm
flyingcloud
 
Posts: 490
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 2:07 am
Location: Honey Brook

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby flyingcloud » Sun Dec 05, 2010 10:10 pm

interspecies hydrogen transfer.

scale this up a few notches ;)
<thanks GL\>
sub-atomical birkland currents
who's you're daddy
flyingcloud
 
Posts: 490
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 2:07 am
Location: Honey Brook

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby mague » Mon Dec 06, 2010 3:45 am

It was always that the most simple building blocks have been the most versatile with a high creative potential :D
mague
 
Posts: 781
Joined: Fri May 02, 2008 2:44 am

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby seasmith » Mon Dec 06, 2010 5:07 pm

flyingcloud »

Interspecies Electron Transfer: Anaerobic Bacteria Found to Cooperate

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 141914.htm
flyingcloud


Electron Transport System

The flow of electrons is similar to that taking place in photosynthesis. Electrons pass from NAD to FAD, to other cytochromes and coenzymes, and eventually they lose much of their energy. In cellular respiration, the final electron acceptor is an oxygen atom. In their energy-depleted condition, the electrons unite with an oxygen atom. The electron–oxygen combination then reacts with two hydrogen ions (protons) to form a water molecule (H2O)


The role of oxygen in cellular respiration is substantial. As a final electron receptor, it is responsible for removing electrons from the system. If oxygen were not available, electrons could not be passed among the coenzymes, the energy in electrons could not be released, the proton pump could not be established, and ATP could not be produced. In humans, breathing is the essential process that brings oxygen into the body for delivery to the cells to participate in cellular respiration.


http://www.cliffsnotes.com/study_guide/Electron-Transport-System.topicArticleId-8741,articleId-8604.html

So it seems that, whatever the species-particular transport system, the end consumption is not of alcohol, hydrogen, oxygen, etc;
but rather it is of protons/electrons = Charge quanta.

Same as sustains stars ?

s
seasmith
 
Posts: 2815
Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 6:59 pm

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby flyingcloud » Thu Jan 13, 2011 4:20 am

Hong Kong researchers store data in bacteria

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-01-hon ... teria.html

The US' national archives occupy more than 500 miles (800 kilometres) of shelving; France's archives stretch for more than 100 miles of shelves, as do Britain's.

Yet a group of students at Hong Kong's Chinese University are making strides towards storing such vast amounts of information in an unexpected home: the E.coli bacterium better known as a potential source of serious food poisoning.

"This means you will be able to keep large datasets for the long term in a box of bacteria in the refrigerator," said Aldrin Yim, a student instructor on the university's biostorage project, a 2010 gold medallist in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)'s prestigious iGEM competition.

Biostorage -- the art of storing and encrypting information in living organisms -- is a young field, having existed for about a decade.

In 2007, a team at Japan's Keio University said they had successfully encoded the equation that represents Einstein's theory of relativity, E=MC2, in the DNA of a common soil bacterium.

They pointed out that because bacteria constantly reproduce, a group of the single-celled organisms could store a piece of information for thousands of years.

But the Hong Kong researchers have leapt beyond this early step, developing methods to store more complex data and starting to overcome practical problems which have lent weight to sceptics who see the method as science fiction.

The group has developed a method of compressing data, splitting it into chunks and distributing it between different bacterial cells, which helps to overcome limits on storage capacity. They are also able to "map" the DNA so information can be easily located.

This opens up the way to storing not only text, but images, music, and even video within cells.

As a storage method it is extremely compact -- because each cell is minuscule, the group says that one gram of bacteria could store the same amount of information as 450 2,000 gigabyte hard disks.

They have also developed a three-tier security fence to encode the data, which may come as welcome news to US diplomats who have seen their thoughts splashed over the Internet thanks to WikiLeaks.

"Bacteria can't be hacked," points out Allen Yu, another student instructor.

"All kinds of computers are vulnerable to electrical failures or data theft. But bacteria are immune from cyber attacks. You can safeguard the information."

The team have even coined a word for this field -- biocryptography -- and the encoding mechanism contains built-in checks to ensure that mutations in some bacterial cells do not corrupt the data as a whole.

Professor Chan Ting Fung, who supervised the student team, told AFP that practical work in the field -- fostered by MIT, who have helped develop standards enabling researchers to collaborate -- was in its early stages.
flyingcloud
 
Posts: 490
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 2:07 am
Location: Honey Brook

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Thu Jan 13, 2011 10:09 am

But the Hong Kong researchers have leapt beyond this early step, developing methods to store more complex data and starting to overcome practical problems which have lent weight to sceptics who see the method as science fiction.


Wow. 10 years ago it was science fiction and nowadays its science fact. Thats pretty fast!
Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -Nikola Tesla -1934
User avatar
MrAmsterdam
 
Posts: 596
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:59 am

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby Jarvamundo » Thu Jan 13, 2011 2:09 pm

So interrogation methods are now a bacterial swab.

"come here Mr Anderson", >swab<, "ok we have what we need, you are free to go"
User avatar
Jarvamundo
 
Posts: 612
Joined: Fri Feb 05, 2010 5:26 pm
Location: Australia

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby seasmith » Sun Mar 06, 2011 5:46 pm

Jarvamundo wrote:
So interrogation methods are now a bacterial swab?


May be moving beyond the swab lately, with
Bessel beam plane illumination microscopy:
The microscopy technique images at high speed, so researchers can create dazzling movies that make biological processes, such as cell division, come alive.

http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=204 ... oo%21+Mail

~
seasmith
 
Posts: 2815
Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 6:59 pm

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby Jarvamundo » Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:58 pm

Hmmm studying cells "live".... Sounds a bit like the Rife Universal Microscope.

awesome videos there! Check out the division ones.. (scroll down a bit) http://www.hhmi.org/news/betzig20110304.html
User avatar
Jarvamundo
 
Posts: 612
Joined: Fri Feb 05, 2010 5:26 pm
Location: Australia

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby flyingcloud » Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:45 pm

Researchers discover how bacteria can immobilize uranium

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-09-bac ... anium.html

(PhysOrg.com) -- For several years, researchers have known that certain kinds of bacteria are able to "feed" off certain metals by either adding or removing electrons from their structure, but until now, haven’t really understood how they do it. Now, new research by Gemma Reguera and her team at Michigan State University have shown that the bacteria do so by means of protein nanowires, called pili, which are hair-like appendages with electrical conductivity. They have reported their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
flyingcloud
 
Posts: 490
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 2:07 am
Location: Honey Brook

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby Adolfo Giurfa » Mon Sep 19, 2011 5:32 am

flyingcloud wrote:interspecies hydrogen transfer.

scale this up a few notches ;)
<thanks GL\>
sub-atomical birkland currents
who's you're daddy

...And our backbone, also a birkeland current...
Adolfo Giurfa
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 10:30 am

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby flyingcloud » Fri Dec 23, 2011 7:15 am

New bug eats sulfates, makes two kinds of magnet

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-12-bug ... agnet.html

A detailed examination of its DNA revealed that BW-1 has two sets of magnetosome genes unlike other that produce only one mineral and have only one set of magnetosome genes. This suggests that the production of magnetite and greigite in BW-1 is likely controlled by separate sets of genes. This could be important in the mass production of either mineral for specific applications.

Due to a slight difference in physical and magnetic properties, greigite might prove superior to iron oxide in some applications. Greigite is also an important magnetic mineral in the sedimentary record, and is thought to play a significant role in the cycling of iron sulfur in modern, and perhaps ancient environments.

These results might provide the insight on the chemical conditions under which this greigite is formed, and will be of great interest to a broad scientific community, ranging from microbiologists to materials scientists and astrobiologists.
flyingcloud
 
Posts: 490
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 2:07 am
Location: Honey Brook

Re: Bacteria wave forms

Unread postby flyingcloud » Wed Feb 22, 2012 7:10 am

Stratospheric Superbugs Offer New Source of Power

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 212614.htm

ScienceDaily (Feb. 21, 2012) — Bacteria normally found 30 kilometres above Earth have been identified as highly efficient generators of electricity.
Bacillus stratosphericus -- a microbe commonly found in high concentrations in the stratosphere -- is a key component of a new 'super' biofilm that has been engineered by a team of scientists from Newcastle University.

Isolating 75 different species of bacteria from the Wear Estuary, Country Durham, UK, the team tested the power-generation of each one using a microbial fuel cell (MFC).

By selecting the best species of bacteria, a kind of microbial "pick and mix," they were able to create an artificial biofilm, doubling the electrical output of the MFC from 105 Watts per cubic metre to 200 Watts per cubic metre.

While still relatively low, this would be enough power to run an electric light and could provide a much needed power source in parts of the world without electricity.

Among the 'super' bugs was B. stratosphericus, a microbe normally found in the atmosphere but brought down to Earth as a result of atmospheric cycling processes and isolated by the team from the bed of the River Wear.

Publishing their findings Feb. 21 in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Environmental Science and Technology,

Grant Burgess, Professor of Marine Biotechnology at Newcastle University, said the research demonstrated the "potential power of the technique."

"What we have done is deliberately manipulate the microbial mix to engineer a biofilm that is more efficient at generating electricity," he explains.

"This is the first time individual microbes have been studied and selected in this way. Finding B. stratosphericus was quite a surprise but what it demonstrates is the potential of this technique for the future -- there are billions of microbes out there with the potential to generate power."

The use of microbes to generate electricity is not a new concept and has been used in the treatment of waste water and sewage plants.

Microbial fuel cells, which work in a similar way to a battery, use bacteria to convert organic compounds directly into electricity by a process known as bio-catalytic oxidation.

A biofilm -- or 'slime' -- coats the carbon electrodes of the MFC and as the bacteria feed, they produce electrons which pass into the electrodes and generate electricity.

Until now, the biofilm has been allowed to grow un-checked but this new study shows for the first time that by manipulating the biofilm you can significantly increase the electrical output of the fuel cell.

Funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), the study identified a number of electricity-generating bacteria.

As well as B. stratosphericus, other electricity-generating bugs in the mix were Bacillus altitudinis -- another bug from the upper atmosphere -- and a new member of the phylum Bacteroidetes.
flyingcloud
 
Posts: 490
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 2:07 am
Location: Honey Brook

Previous

Return to The Human Question

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest