The Spirit of the Universe

What is a human being? What is life? Can science give us reliable answers to such questions? The electricity of life. The meaning of human consciousness. Are we alone? Are the traditional contests between science and religion still relevant? Does the word "spirit" still hold meaning today?

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Re: The Spirit of the Universe

Unread postby Sovereign Slave » Sat Feb 10, 2018 8:13 pm

Now that's very interesting indeed. I'm definitely no scientist, but have been reading on the EU website (mainly the picture of the days) for years, don't remember ever reading anything like you propose, though it could easily be a topic that's been covered, maybe a lot, perhaps at the conferences. Is a very elegant proposition though, whether it's your own assertion or from EU community, as it seems to smack of a unified theory (grand, field, or whatever) of everything. Would imagine it would also illicit an immediate pitchfork and sickle reaction from mainstream, so I suspect it's not been widely discussed in EU circles, but if you could point me to some EU articles would love to follow up on it. Also, do you know of anyone researching this? Regardless, it's a fascinating proposition, and if there is warrant to it, would highlight the massive amount more there is to discover about electricity.
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Re: The Spirit of the Universe

Unread postby jtb » Sun Feb 11, 2018 4:18 pm

"Cosmos without Gravitation" by Velikovsky https://www.varchive.org/ce/cosmos.htm
Sovereign, thunderbolts.info is based on the writings of Emanuel Velikovsky and his theory of an Electric Universe. Search thunderbolts forum "Thornhill's gravity model" under "Electric Universe". Also, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkWiBxWieQU What I'm proposing is plagiarized. Nothing original. Wal Thornhill answers my question of why objects are drawn up or down rather than left or right in his video: Earth's surface is negatively charged while objects on its surface are positively charged. Too simple.
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Re: The Spirit of the Universe

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Sat Mar 03, 2018 8:31 am

jacmac wrote:Daemon_Nice said:

What separates the animate, that which is alive, from the inanimate, that which is not alive?


The answer from http://www.quora.com:
What is the borderline between animate and inanimate matter called?


Viruses (the biological organisms and not computer viruses) have certain features of living beings but cannot reproduce or multiply on their own without a host. A virus is basically simple genetic material (DNA or RNA) with a protein coat.

On its own, a virus can be deemed non-living; it can neither metabolize nor multiply. It is neither a cell with cellular organelles and only becomes living once it enters a host. Once it enters (attack) a hose, it picks up DNA and/or transcribes it into RNA to become active (living).


If virus is both alive and not alive, then where does the discussion go ?
I agree with Cargo:
Whatever you do, don't mix religion with reality.



Viruses are the products of bacteria. They do not engage in energy transfers, reproducing instead entirely by intrusion into host bacteria (and other cells structures). John M. Barry, in The Great Influenza (2004), one of the best and absolutely engaging books on the 1918 epidemic, spends early chapters in the distinction between viral and bacterial action, which could be considered a primer on the subject, although inconclusive in the admission that we know almost nothing about viruses, where they come from, how they operate, or what their purpose seems to be.
"I decided to believe, as you might decide to take
an aspirin: It can't hurt, and you might get better."
-- Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum (1988)
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Re: The Spirit of the Universe

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Sun Mar 04, 2018 9:43 am

Fred Hoyle and Chandra Wickramasminghe in Diseases from Space (1979) claimed a correlation of the severity of influenza pandemics with sunspot activity, and suggested that viruses or bacterial spores could be transmitted to Earth from the tails of comets and with streams of meteors.
-=-=-=- These men are highly respected astronomers and their opinions are not to be neglected. Chandra Wickramasminghe and Jayant Narlikar followed up with another paper in 2001, claiming evidence of bacteria captured at altitudes of 41 km above the Earth. But a pandemic influenza is viral, not bacterial. All four of these people also assume that the agents of epidemics, viruses or bacterial spores, come from Venus or at least are of extraterrestrial origin. Bob Fritzius writes:
"Compared to Earth, Venus has a negligible magnetic field. That means that the solar wind can disturb its atmosphere directly, and can blow away fractions of its upper atmosphere (including airborne particulate matter) in comet-like fashion." This suggests the existence of life-forms in the upper layers of atmosphere of Venus, the only part of the planet which actually receives sunlight. At its surface, Venus is jet black. There is no light.
However, if as most Catastrophists suggest ( that there have been periods in the past when the orbit of Venus extended past the orbit of Earth.) Transfer of molecules (as ions) along the exterior double layers of plasmaspheres of planets is almost certain. This suggests that a transfer could have been made in the remote past.
If organisms, originally from Earth, could be delivered back to Earth, it seems likely that bacterial spores and viruses would eventually also be found on the Moon and Mars. This would cause considerable rethinking of our biological uniqueness in the Solar System.
Considering that the bacteria represent 80 percent of the biomass of Earth, and are found absolutely everywhere, it is quite possible that a bacterial transfer from Earth could thrive in the Venusian upper atmosphere. It is highly likely that these forms would have mutated into many diverse species by now. But it is highly doubtful if bacteria would survive transport across 30 million miles of space.
Viruses are the products of bacteria. Viruses could without a doubt survive a 30 million mile trip through space. Many forms seem to be almost totally indestructible.
"I decided to believe, as you might decide to take
an aspirin: It can't hurt, and you might get better."
-- Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum (1988)
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