Extraordinary Light

Has science taken a wrong turn? If so, what corrections are needed? Chronicles of scientific misbehavior. The role of heretic-pioneers and forbidden questions in the sciences. Is peer review working? The perverse "consensus of leading scientists." Good public relations versus good science.

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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:55 pm

~
Optical Soundings

Great analogy and nice condensation
sted: Jun 7th, 2013
Whispering light hears liquids talk
(Nanowerk News) Ever been to a whispering gallery—a quiet, circular space underneath an old cathedral dome that captures and amplifies sounds as quiet as a whisper? Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are applying similar principles in the development optomechanical sensors that will help unlock vibrational secrets of chemical and biological samples at the nanoscale.
"Optomechanics is an area of research in which extremely minute forces exerted by light (for example: radiation pressure, gradient force, electrostriction) are used to generate and control high-frequency mechanical vibrations of microscale and nanoscale devices," explained Gaurav Bahl, an assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering at Illinois.
In glass microcavities that function as optical whispering galleries, according to Bahl, these miniscule optical forces can be enhanced by many orders-of-magnitude, which enables 'conversations' between light (photons) and vibration (phonons). These devices are of interest to condensed matter physics as the strong phonon-photon coupling enables experiments targeting quantum information storage (i.e. qubits), quantum-mechanical ground state (i.e. optomechanical cooling), and ultra-sensitive force measurements past the standard quantum limit.
Researchers developed a hollow optomechanical device made of fused silica glass, through which fluids and gases could flow. Employing a unique optomechanical interaction called Brillouin Optomechanics (described previously in Bahl et al, Nature Communications 2:403, 2011; Bahl et al, Nature Physics, vol.8, no.3, 2012), the researchers achieved the optical excitation of mechanical whispering-gallery modes at a phenomenal range of frequencies spanning from 2 MHz to 11,000 MHz.

This is a false-color SEM (scanning electron micrograph) of the microfluidic optomechanical resonator. (Image: Gaurav Bahl, University of Illinois)
"These mechanical vibrations can, in turn, 'talk' to liquids within the hollow device and provide optical readout of the mechanical properties," said Bahl, who is first author of the paper, "Brillouin cavity optomechanics with microfluidic devices," published this week in Nature Communications ("Brillouin cavity optomechanics with microfluidic devices").
By confining various liquids inside a hollow microfluidic optomechanical (µFOM) resonator, researchers built the first-ever bridge between optomechanics and microfluidics.
"We found that the optomechanical interaction in the µFOM device is dependent on the fluid contained within," Bahl said. "These results are a step towards novel experiments probing optomechanics on non-solid phases of matter. In particular, the high frequency, high quality-factor mechanical vibrations demonstrated in this work may enable strongly localized, high-sensitivity, optomechanical interaction with chemical and biological samples."
Potential uses for this technology include optomechanical biosensors that can measure various optical and mechanical properties of a single cell, ultra-high-frequency analysis of fluids, and the optical control of fluid flow.
Source: University of Illinois College of Engineering
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Mon Jun 24, 2013 3:11 pm

Image
Propeller or wheel: In circularly polarised light, the vector which represents the electric field of the light wave (blue arrows) rotates helically in the direction of propagation. Such an electromagnetic wave has longitudinal angular momentum. If two circularly polarised waves rotating in opposite directions meet at a focal point, light with purely transverse angular momentum is generated. Its electric field vector rotates about an axis perpendicular to the direction of propagation like a bicycle spoke.

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light in Erlangen are now able to use a laser to cause tiny particles to rotate around an axis perpendicular to the light beam – a particle thus rotates like the wheel of a bicycle in its direction of motion. The researchers achieved this by creating a photonic wheel: light with purely transverse angular momentum. This state of light was previously unknown.

http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=31 ... z2XAq2MTKY


n classical mechanics, a system may possess angular momentum which can be either transverse (e.g. in a spinning wheel) or longitudinal(e.g. for a spiraling seed falling from a tree) with respect to the direction of motion. However, for light, a typical massless wave system,the situation is less versatile. Photons are well-known to exhibit intrinsic angular momentum which is longitudinal only: the spin angularmomentum defining the polarization and the orbital angular momentum associated with a spiraling phase front.

https://www.jeos.org/index.php/jeos_rp/ ... view/13032


Phase is holographic in nature, not a particle or wave 'front'.
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Wed Sep 25, 2013 3:31 pm

What the heck is "virtual" anyway ?

Photon + Photon ≈ Mass ergnh?

Physics Mikhail Lukin and MIT Professor of Physics Vladan Vuletic have managed to coax photons into binding together to form molecules




When Lukin and colleagues fired two photons into the cloud, they were surprised to see them exit together, as a single molecule.
The reason they form the never-before-seen molecules?
An effect called a Rydberg blockade, Lukin said,...


Eventually, some of these erudite noggins will make the inevitable connection between Matter, Light and an aether,
one can only hope ...


http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=32470.php?\
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby +EyeOn-W-ANeed2Know » Wed Oct 02, 2013 2:32 am

seasmith wrote:What the heck is "virtual" anyway ?

Photon + Photon ≈ Mass ergnh?

Physics Mikhail Lukin and MIT Professor of Physics Vladan Vuletic have managed to coax photons into binding together to form molecules




When Lukin and colleagues fired two photons into the cloud, they were surprised to see them exit together, as a single molecule.
The reason they form the never-before-seen molecules?
An effect called a Rydberg blockade, Lukin said,...


Eventually, some of these erudite noggins will make the inevitable connection between Matter, Light and an aether,
one can only hope ...


http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=32470.php?\


Now I'm no Harvard/MIT guy like this team, but lets see if I can figure out why the light might have pulled together like that.

"A cloud of atomized Rubidium (Rb 37) in a supercooled vac chamber is hit with twin low power pulse laser emissions."

So they used a highly reactive & slightly radioactive, alkali metal element in temps lower than a superconductor.
Rb is a strong electropositive, in an atomized form in a vac chamber, it just needs a trigger event.
In effect, they created the ideal conditions for a cold dusty plasma and excited 2 paths through it with the laser pulses.

We already know light bends in a plasma.
The emitters were probably pretty close together so the amount of refraction needed would be small anyway.
Am I mistaken or would the near 0 K temp slow the charges resulting in the speed change of the "photons" that they noticed.
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Mon Oct 07, 2013 8:08 pm

So they used a highly reactive & slightly radioactive, alkali metal element in temps lower than a superconductor.
Rb is a strong electropositive, in an atomized form in a vac chamber, it just needs a trigger event.
In effect, they created the ideal conditions for a cold dusty plasma and excited 2 paths through it with the laser pulses.

We already know light bends in a plasma.
The emitters were probably pretty close together so the amount of refraction needed would be small anyway.
Am I mistaken or would the near 0 K temp slow the charges resulting in the speed change of the "photons" that they noticed.


EyeOn,

All good points and a reasonably valid appraisal.
Guess what i was actually commenting on was Lukin's comment:
The discovery, Lukin said, runs contrary to decades of accepted wisdom about the nature of light. Photons have long been described as massless particles which don't interact with each other – shine two laser beams at each other, he said, and they simply pass through one another.


Not entirely accurate, even if one chooses to view "photons' as particulates.
For example:

Interference even occurs when the two beams have the same phase and frequency but polarizations of the two beams are mutually orthogonal. In that case the interference pattern consists of a pattern of varying polarization, not varying intensity. Place a polarizing filter in the region where the beams overlap, and the interference pattern immediately becomes visible.

http://www.researchgate.net/post/The_interference_between_two_different_lasers_at_the_same_wavelength

This begs the question, What is being "polarized" ?
I would simply suggest that it is the ground-state aetheric matrix, (which mediates between luminous and physical states) being orientated;
as the vanes of a turbine, or as iron filings are aligned in a magnetic field of layers .

And i believe you are quite right to posit the electric plasma state (of "matter", in member Solar's terms), as the transitional mode of energy exchange (that is the ænergy supplied by the driving laser beams).
With out 'driver' and 'probe' beams, they have only a cold fog ;)
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Fri Oct 25, 2013 5:41 pm

Posted: Oct 25, 2013
Light propagation, the classical way



The results of the two-slit interference experiment—as it was known—were brought into line with quantum mechanics by arranging the measurements such that the results were averaged over several experiments conducted using a number of photons. This means that the precise position of a single photon was not actually measured. Instead, its properties were retrospectively deduced by making many measurements on identical particles.

Explaining these experiments required complicated quantum theory arguments. Nori and his colleagues have now presented an alternative viewpoint. “We give a classical-optics interpretation of this experiment and other related problems,” says Bliokh.



http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=32 ... z2imfOqC00
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Fri Oct 25, 2013 7:00 pm

Ω
Photoelectric Devices

A useful way of correlating observed phenomena of 'Electrons and Photons' is by comparing space domains with time domains, or degrees of freedom:


As first theorized by Swiss physicist Felix Bloch, electrons move in a crystal in a regular, repeating pattern dictated by the periodic structure of the crystal lattice. Photons are electromagnetic waves that have a distinct, regular frequency; their interaction with matter leads to Floquet states, named after the French mathematician Gaston Floquet. “Entangling” electrons with photons in a coherent manner generates the Floquet-Bloch state, which is periodic both in time and space.






Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have succeeded in producing and measuring a coupling of photons and electrons on the surface of an unusual type of material called a topological insulator. This type of coupling had been predicted by theorists, but never observed.



Gedik, postdoctoral researcher Yihua Wang (now at Stanford Univ.) and two other MIT researchers carried out the experiments using a technique Gedik’s laboratory has been developing for several years. Their method involves shooting femtosecond pulses of mid-infrared light at a sample of material and observing the results with an electron spectrometer, a specialized high-speed camera the team developed.



The researchers mixed the photons from an intense laser pulse with the exotic surface electrons [SPP?] on a topological insulator. Their high-speed camera captured snapshots of the exotic state, from its generation to its rapid disappearance, a process lasting only a few hundred femtoseconds. They also found there were different kinds of mixed states when the polarization of the photons changed.


That actually modifies how electrons move in this system. And when we do this, the light does not even get absorbed.”
!

Which begs the question: what is that common underlying 'medium' of energy transmission ?


http://www.rdmag.com/news/2013/10/produ ... -it-matter[/color]
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Sun Oct 27, 2013 6:49 pm

method involves shooting femtosecond pulses of mid-infrared light at a sample of material and observing the results with an electron spectrometer• ¡, a specialized high-speed camera ...

http://www.rdmag.com/news/2013/10/produ ... -it-matter

Theory of Core Level Photoemission of Electrons
In a solid, also inelastic scattering events contribute to the photoemission process, generating electron-hole pairs which show up as an inelastic tail on the high BE side of the main photoemission peak. In some cases, we observe also energy loss features due to plasmon excitations. This can either a final state effect caused by core hole decay, which generates quantized electron wave excitations in the solid (intrinsic plasmons), or it can be due to excitations induced by photoelectrons travelling from the emitter to the surface (extrinsic plasmons). Due to the reduced coordination number of first-layer atoms, the plasma frequency of bulk and surface atoms are related by the following equation: , so that surface and bulk plasmons can be easily distinguished from each other. Plasmon states in a solid are typically localized at the surface, and can strongly affect the electron Inelastic Mean Free Path (IMFP).
Vibrational effects
Temperature-dependent atomic lattice vibrations, or phonons, can broaden the core level components and attenuate the interference patterns in an XPD (X-Ray Photoelectron Diffraction) experiment. The simplest way to account for vibrational effects is by multiplying the scattered single-photoelectron wave function by the Debye-Waller factor:
,
where is the squared magnitude of the wave vector variation caused by scattering, and is the temperature-dependent one dimensional vibrational mean squared displacement of the emitter. In the Debye model, the mean squared displacement is calculated in terms of the Debye temperature, , as:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-ray_photoelectron_spectroscopy


So they bend a beam like for optical rainbows and have~detectors~but oh my,
does this needs work?
['May all make perfect sense to member Orrey ...]

Trying to find the quote now where it was said "electron spectrumscopy' detectors could read/read-out, (directly), the received electron beam in a wide band from IR to hard x-ray!; does that spectrum show the optical band, or does it require a reciprocal "electro-luminiscent" TV sçreen ?


It's nice that M. Gedik says openly,

“In solid-state physics, we often have no other choice but to rely on serendipity when looking for interesting materials,” Galitski says. The new MIT findings “partially challenge this fundamental paradigm by experimentally demonstrating that one can control at will the band structure of a material by subjecting it to an " intense optical pulse.”


ring that bellΩ
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Fri Jan 31, 2014 10:22 pm

Seems nano-chimes are the easiest to ring:

Image

to emit light that is polarized right at the source. This can be achieved with quantum dots – crystals of semiconductive material so small that they produce quantum mechanical phenomena. But until now, they have only achieved polarization that is either entirely too weak or hard to control.
A semiconductive materials research group led by Professor Per Olof Holtz is now presenting an alternative method where asymmetrical quantum dots of a nitride material with indium is formed at the top of microscopic six-sided pyramids. With these, they have succeeded in creating light with a high degree of linear polarization, on average 84%. The results are being published in the Nature periodical Light: Science & Applications

http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1038/lsa.2014.20


The micropyramid is constructed through crystalline growth, atom layer by atom layer, of the semiconductive material gallium nitride. A couple of nanothin layers where the metal indium is also included are laid on top of this. From the asymmetrical quantum dot thus formed at the top, light particles are emitted with a well-defined wavelength.


In other words, molecular surface-effect acts as crystal planes to orientate the wavelength of the emitted light.
≥Instead of using 'polarizing' filters to rectify the vibrational plane of a light beam, they are emitting it directly, with a high degree of polarization .

The aim of this kind of research is generally to be able to process and transmit Information, so if these nano-emitters can next be conduced into coherent phase emissions (perhaps with some gate voltage), then single nano-dot lasers could replace inefficient arrays
in the coming photo-electric circuit boards and processors.

÷Again the interesting stuff is occurring at a surface/interface, the pointier the better in this case, unlike ionospheric fascia


http://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology_ ... z2s2eNEISz
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Sat Mar 08, 2014 11:12 pm

more polarized light:

.
..the crystal lattice was sensitive to the laser beam’s polarisation (that is, the direction of the light wave’s beating movement) with respect to the direction of chemical bonds that hold the material...reported in Nature Communications ("Two-photon polarization-selective etching of emergent nano-structures on diamond surfaces"), is that the shape and orientation of these patterns are dependent on the alignment of the laser polarisation with the way atoms line up in the crystal lattice…


Image
Electron microscope image of the nanoscale etch pattern on diamond created by the UV laser treatment. (Image: Rich Mildren


e results show for the first time that a laser beam can target specific atoms on the surface, in a way not yet entirely understood, causing their chemical bonds to break before there is any significant dissipation of energy into the surrounding are


EM Scalpel?
So how would a passive "plane of polarization" slice a hard diamond? Like any Star Trek laser phaser saber, that 'polarization plane' creates a dynamic: phase propagation. Electricity may be "static", or may be phased into motion, like light, it's transverse cousin.
Here though it wasn't plasma-arcing by beam, it was cleaving by emissive edge.
No need for heat and hydrodynamics, just line up magnetic domain lines with the diamond's crystal cleavage, and apply the laser's juice.
They call it "splitting electron pairings", without defining any of those three words, but in actuality it's atoms being separated ( and unlike electrons, we had a fair idea of what atoms look like: elements with coupled molecules).

In the electron microscope image above imo, the laser beam seems to cut more like a Martian harrow in a magnaetheric flux field, than a surgical scalpel on a scalp.


http://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology_news/newsid=34684.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+nanowerk%2FagWB+%28Nanowerk+Nanotechnology+News%29#ixzz2vREq6n3x
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Wed Jan 14, 2015 9:31 pm

~
Edge Colors

What Goethe called [either, or aether] physical or physiological effects.

I also disavow the Necessity of particulate (or wavelet) models in discussions of 'light',
unless that is the quantifying model that one is versed in, for mathematic and conceptual manipulation of the data.

viewtopic.php?f=8&t=3890

Goethe saw Edge Colors as “parts of daylight” (cumulated spectra from either spectrum limit).

Schopenhauer (Über das Sehn und die Farben) noticed that there exist exactly two best bipartitions of daylight.
(at antipodes of the color spectrum)

http://ostwald.bbaw.de/dateien/BerlinBrand_Ak_04.pdf


Yellow is a light which has been dampened by darkness Blue is a darkness weakened by light.
- Goethe

http://oalexa.files.wordpress.com/2012/ ... tes-v1.pdf
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_Colours


Miles Mathis' recent (brief) explanation of "Edge Effect", in terms of fundamental charge field-

http://milesmathis.com/rain4.pdf
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Wed Apr 15, 2015 6:09 pm

~
Light must travel in a straight line and at a constant speed, or so the laws of nature suggest. Now, researchers at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg have demonstrated that laser light traveling along a helical path through space, can accelerate and decelerate as it spins into the distance.
http://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology-news/newsid=39768.php?

Light in a Spin
Previously, Forbes and his collaborators have shown that light could be made to spin.
In this recent work they demonstrated the first realisation of angular accelerating light and showed that light could also be made to accelerate and decelerate.
This acceleration can be controlled with a single parameter that is readily tuned with a digital hologram written to a standard LCD screen, much like your LCD television at home, but just a much smaller version.

"Our angular accelerating fields rely on combinations of orbital angular momentum - so-called twisted light," says Forbes. Light carrying orbital angular momentum is created by twisting the wave-front of light into a helical shape, forming a spiral.

Usually this twist in the light's wave-front is smooth, like a spiral staircase with regular steps. "Our novelty was to realise that by twisting the helicity of these beams in a non-linear fashion, the result would be a propagation dependent angular velocity," he explains. In other words, the light spins at a non-constant speed, resulting in angular acceleration.

In fact, the light speeds up and slows down as it travels, periodically switching from one mode to the other. Following its helical path through space, the helix appears to wind up very tightly as it accelerates, and winds down very loosely as it decelerates

It is intriguing that by "twisting the twist", nature provides an additional momentum to the field causing it to accelerate as it spins.

http://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10 ... .91.043821

Don't really know what to make of this development just now, but have a feeling we will hear much more about it in the Future.
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby seasmith » Tue May 26, 2015 8:17 pm

REVEAL
DARPA's Revolutionary Enhancement of Visibility by Exploiting Active Light-fields

Shedding light on untapped information in photons
(Nanowerk News) Conventional optical imaging systems today largely limit themselves to the measurement of light intensity, providing two-dimensional renderings of three-dimensional scenes and ignoring significant amounts of additional information that may be carried by captured light. For example, many photons traverse complex paths punctuated by multiple bounces prior to entering the aperture of a camera or other imager—a process through which these photons pick up information about their surroundings. Beyond such directional variability, light enjoys other aspects or degrees of freedom—including variations in propagation time, polarization state and spectral content, as well as wave-related properties such as coherence, diffraction and interference—all of which provide potential mechanisms by which light can acquire and convey information. Most of this information remains untapped today.

http://www.darpa.mil/NewsEvents/Release ... 05/22.aspx

It's like these enfants just stumbled out of the sandbox, into the big, bright backyard and said "what the ...."
Which may not be a bad thing.

Just wait 'til they detect the 'clear light' ;)
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby webolife » Sat Jun 13, 2015 11:24 am

Miles Mathis's edge effect is very interesting to me as I have studied this same effect in numerous situations under the premise of a Centropic Pressure Field, Mathis's "charge field". Mathis makes an interesting statement about violet that I would like to challenge -- my observations of edge violet seem to demonstrate that violet is always on the dark side of the ostensible dark/light edge, and indigo is on the light side of that edge. It doesn't really matter about the intensity of background light, although a more direct source makes the violet show up better. I believe and here assert that violet is always a result of the mixture of blue and red, in defiant contradiction to standard electromagnetic spectrum theory. I further can demonstrate that the edges of slit devices as well as the beamsplitter edges produce these same effects, irrelevant to any considerations of interference, implying that light is a pressure effect unrelated to waving. Slit devices are just different versions of pinholes, and the banded spectral patterns produced thereby can be shown to be direct images of the light source [field] by simple ray diagrams.
Truth extends beyond the border of self-limiting science. Free discourse among opposing viewpoints draws the open-minded away from the darkness of inevitable bias and nearer to the light of universal reality.
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Re: Extraordinary Light

Unread postby Webbman » Sun Jun 14, 2015 1:14 pm

ive always considered light to be an electromagnetic charge corkscrew. The corkscrew comes in all sizes and acts like both a particle and a wave. a particle alone doesn't seem to account for it.

even more interesting is that it can also act like a spring when it hits anything that cant absorb it and bounces off.
The secret to the universe is a rubber band.
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