George Woodward Warder - Universe as Vast Electric Organism

Books, journal articles, web pages, and news reports that can help to clarify the history and promise of the Electric Universe hypothesis.

Moderators: MGmirkin, bboyer

George Woodward Warder - Universe as Vast Electric Organism

Unread postby Phorce » Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:03 am

Hello ! My first post here.

After many years of interest in the EU but little time to follow up I watched Thunderbolts of the Gods. Afterwards a search of Google Books turned up this work by George Woodward Warder (I think the text is also available for free at other sites). I know the EU has a long history, but I was nevertheless quite surprised to find this work from 1903. I have not read it all yet but here is one passage ...

But the most pitiable and unfortunate of the one-
sided scientists are those who would banish logic
from the realms of physics, and who regard a de-
duction or a theory as an enemy of science; who
heap scorn on analytic reason the highest gift of
Deity to man and who deem the tabulation of
dry facts without causes the only purpose of science.
Who want science fenced in with a stone wall and
separated from religion and philosophy, and the
earth cut up into sections and labelled astronomy,
chemistry, geology, and so on ad infinitum


(p133, CHAPTER IX - AT PRESENT SCIENCE IS IN A DUBIOUS AND CHAOTIC
CONDITION)

Which sounds alarmingly like what I was just watching. Have over a hundred years led us no where ? Actually I see many signs that the situation is now radically shifting.

So who is this fellow ? From what I can find out George Woodward Warder was a poet and visionary. Presumably he was basing his observations on the Scientific discoveries of the time. There must be many other resources of this type that show the EU to be something far vaster than the "latest internet conspiracy".
Exploration and discovery without honest investigation of "extraordinary" results leads to a Double Bind (Bateson, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_bind ) that creates loss of hope and depression. No more Double Binds !
User avatar
Phorce
 
Posts: 228
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2010 1:54 am
Location: The Phorce

Re: George Woodward Warder - Universe as Vast Electric Organism

Unread postby Osmosis » Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:32 am

Hi Phorce,
Welcome to the EU. I think you will enjoy your stay. :D
Osmosis
Osmosis
 
Posts: 419
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:52 pm
Location: San Jose, California

Re: George Woodward Warder - Universe as Vast Electric Organism

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Thu Sep 23, 2010 11:05 am

Hi Mr Phorce,

Good find there! I also discovered this book about a year ago. And to my surprise lots of people on the forum knew this book already! It seems to be a part of history of the days of Tesla where electricity in space was a acceptable perspective. It is really weird to thing about this, did physics partly take a wrong turn? What are your thoughts on this?
Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -Nikola Tesla -1934
User avatar
MrAmsterdam
 
Posts: 595
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:59 am

Re: George Woodward Warder - Universe as Vast Electric Organism

Unread postby Phorce » Thu Sep 23, 2010 11:37 am

Thanks. Glad I found you.
Exploration and discovery without honest investigation of "extraordinary" results leads to a Double Bind (Bateson, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_bind ) that creates loss of hope and depression. No more Double Binds !
User avatar
Phorce
 
Posts: 228
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2010 1:54 am
Location: The Phorce

Re: George Woodward Warder - Universe as Vast Electric Organism

Unread postby nick c » Thu Sep 23, 2010 12:30 pm

Welcome Phorce,
Yes, Warder was certainly ahead of his time. Wal has commented on how science was on the verge of stepping into the Electric Universe in the 19th C., but just could not make the leap, probably due to a lack of understanding of the implications of the electrical nature of the newly discovered 4th state of matter- plasma, and the realization that 99% of the universe is in this state.
Warder has been discussed previously (by MrAmsterdam) in the forum:
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=2694
also:
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=3574
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=3576
As well as in the EU wiki style reference site, The Electric Universe Theory:
Alternative Electric Universe theories
Others have described, or had described, their theories as the "Electric Universe", and while they may share some features in common, may ne wholly different too.

In 1903, George Woodward Warder's book, The universe a vast electric organism, included Chapter XV "The Electric Universe is Self-Sustaining and Eternal".[1]
In 1959, Herman Bondi and R.A. Lyttleton proposed of "The possibility of a general excess of charge in the universe"[2] which Bondi referred to as the Electric Universe.[3]
In 1978, P. C. W. Davies in an article in Nature,[4] described a paper on "The electrically polarized universe" by John Bally and E. R. Harrison in Astrophysics Journal.[5] Davies notes: ""In spite of its Velikovskian flavour, the Bally-Harrison electric universe unfortunately does not lead to any obviously important astrophysical consequences".
In 1998, Dr. László Körtvélyessy's book, The Electric Universe [6] also highlighted the importance of electricity in astronomy, but he does not subscribe to an electric-powered Sun, nor electrical scarring.

http://www.electricuniverse.info/Electr ... rse_theory

Nick
User avatar
nick c
Moderator
 
Posts: 2327
Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:12 pm
Location: connecticut

Re: George Woodward Warder - Universe as Vast Electric Organism

Unread postby moses » Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:39 pm

Have over a hundred years led us no where ?
Phorce


Well there are golden pearls like EU and reliving psychotherapy, but science is run like a business these days. Just like politicians say what they think will be acceptable to the public, scientists are far more bound by public funding than what is truth. So the public mind controls everything, but the group mind is damaged by the catastrophes that our DNA went through. So healing that damage is the top priority, and so working out what actually happened in the past is part of this.
Mo
moses
 
Posts: 1051
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:18 pm
Location: Adelaide

Re: George Woodward Warder - Universe as Vast Electric Organism

Unread postby Phorce » Mon Sep 27, 2010 5:06 am

MrAmsterdam wrote: It seems to be a part of history of the days of Tesla where electricity in space was a acceptable perspective. It is really weird to thing about this, did physics partly take a wrong turn? What are your thoughts on this?


One has to look at the at the big picture. It is not just a problem with Physics. Here are a couple of pages from my copy of Commonsense Rebellion (Bruce E Levine) that I think explains very well how an EU theory that strongly supports our own inclusiveness in the Universe can be ignored and rejected by institutional society. I was only feeling this last night looking up at the stars seeing them as electrically connected, even conscious.

260 Chapter 25

Would we be machine worshipers today if we had a different version of
what defines our humanity? This error has been a tidy rationale for the mod-
ern worship of the mega-machine and conquest of all of nature. This and other
great errors need to be challenged not simply to end our machine worship, but
to exorcise ourselves of our cynicism about humankind.

HUMAN BEINGS BEFORE THE WORSHIP OF MACHINES
AND AUTHORITY

Early versions of the creature we now identify as human go back over
500,000 years, and the modern species Home sapiens goes back some 50,000
to 100,000 years. From this perspective, 3500 B.C., the beginning of what we
call civilization, isn’t that terribly long ago. Over twelve thousand years ago-
more than six thousand years before civilization——humans had technics: traps,
nets, skin containers, baskets, hearths, huts, varied weapons, paints, masks,
painted images, and graphic signs. They also had healthy culture: traditions
expressed in rituals, customs, religion, social organization, art, and language 5
Before civilization, humans lived in what anthropologists called "archaic
village cultures." Actually, up until the last couple of centuries, the majority
of the planet continued to live that way. This is much of traditional Native
American and African tribal culture, and it still exists in a few spots on the
planet. These archaic villages had mixed economies of hunting, gathering,
and farming, and the kind of technology that all could understand and most
could master. These cultures, though different from one another, shared many
things in common. What was the archaic village like?
Much of the time was devoted to watching and instructing the young. Chil-
dren were of value, as they could make economic contributions. ln all these
cultures, seasons were marked by holiday festivals and ceremonies, and stages
of life were noted by communal rituals. Eating, drinking, and sexual play
made up a central core of life. Family and friends were all part of a face—to-
face community. While civilization was to be defined, in part, by the written
word, in archaic villages the transmission of culture was arguably more pow-
erful: oral history. In this manner, generation after generation received the
principles of the nurturing of life, which included the sharing of goods, self-
discipline, self-control, and cooperation.6 This way of living was both satisfy-
ing and successful in maintaining community and autonomy without institu-
tionalized authoritarianism. Mumford notes there was

no hierarchy . . . except the natural one of age, since in such a community,
he who lived longest knew most. The easy interchange of skills and occupa-
tions, with a minimum amount of specialization, gave village culture a flex-
ibility and range .... [Every] member of the village community, of every
age . . . had an active part in its whole economic and social life, each con-
tributing his effort .... 7

Y2K Compliance: Technics and Machine Worship 261

This daily participation in meaningful activity is exactly what is missing in
the modern machine economy
, and, as Mumford points out, probably ac-
counts in large measure for juvenile boredom and juvenile delinquency. In the
1920s and 1930s Bronislaw Malinowski studied the Trobriand Islanders, who
were still living for the most part at the same levels as had these earliest archaic
villagers. Malinowslii wrote:

Tiny children actually did make their own gardens; the heavier labor is of
course done for them by their elders, but [children] have to work seriously
for many hours at clearing, planting, and weeding .... The gardens of
the community are not merely a means to food; they are a source of pride
and the main object of collective ambition.8 `

Mumford knew that his first task was to shake us from our cynicism over
human nature. If we continue to beIieve—as totalitarians hope we do—that
humans are inherently evil or stupid, then we give up our efforts for a higher
quality of life. Next, Mumford challenged pessimists who might not believe
that humans are inherently evil or stupid, but see the march of human history
as a continuous decline. This is another great error. These archaic villagers had
arguably more of their human needs satisfied than those paleolithic humans
that preceded them. Mumford concluded that archaic villages had a higher
level of satisfactions than had existed before them, as these villages "brought
the outer and inner life into harmony, making the most of man’s powers, but
neither taxing them too heavily, nor over—emphasizing one set of functions at
the expense of another. "9
This pessimistic view of continuous decline in the satisfaction of human
needs is not borne out even after 3500 B.C. After giant institutions such as the
Egyptians and Mesopotamian empires collapsed, there was increased auton-
omy and community, Mumford offers us another example of a "comeback”
of our humanity: After the Black Death had wiped out a third to a half of Eu—
rope, the status of the worker improved.10
There are other major and minor examples of the rejuvenation of society and
culture to meet human needs. Both the cynic, who sees humans as inherently stu-
pid or evil, and the pessimist, who sees the march of human history as one of in-
creasing dissatisfaction, are for Mumford mistaken. For Commonsense Rebel-
lion, these cynics and pessimists are as valuable to institutional society as those
who believe in HMOs, Xanax, fen—phen, prisons-for—profit, gambling commer—
cials, billion—dollar warplanes, and those 400 DSM psychiatric diagnoses.

CIVILIZATION?

We are taught in school that civilization began around 3500 B.C. in the
Near East. This marked the beginning of the end of the neolithic era of ar-
chaic villages, though, as noted, the majority of the planet did not become
"civilized" until the last two centuries. Civilization is routinely defined as a

262 Chapter 25

technological event, and for the most part it is considered a triumph. Both
of these assumptions are challenged by Mumford.
The first great error was defining human beings by their tools, not their cul-
ture and language. Another great error is how we define civilization. In fact,
there was no great superiority in technology that defined civilization. Instead,
civilization merely meant a change in scale of already existing technology.
With mass society and dictatorial control, there could be mass planting, mass
irrigation, and massive structures not because of better tools and equipment,
says Mumford, "but because a highly efficient type of social organization . . .
had taken command.”
H
Civilization is inaccurately defined as the beginning of technology. Mumford
tells us that what truly set this era apart was its revolutionary social organiza-
tion, its hierarchy or pyramid-like social structure: "This political structure
was the basic invention of [civilization] . . . without it, neither its monuments
nor its cities could have been built."12 Civilization, Mumford tells us, rather
than being the beginning of technology, was the beginning of the use of tech-
nology exclusively to "increase order, power, predictability, and above all, con-
trol" (this in fact was an early version of modern scientific ideology). This new
political structure was

no longer ‘democratic,’ that is, based on neighbourly intimacy, customary
usage, and consent, but authoritarian, centrally directed, under the con-
trol of a dominant minority
: no longer confined to a limited territory, but
deliberately ‘going out of bounds’ to seize raw materials and enslave help-
less men, to exercise control, to exact tribute. This new culture was dedi-
cated . . . to the expansion of collective power. By perfecting new instru-
ments of coercion, the rulers of this society had, by the Third Millennium
B.C., organized industrial and military power on a scale that was never to
be surpassed until our own time.13

Civilization, rather than a modern advance, is socially about as primitive as
you can get
. No doubt many archaic villagers viewed civilization as the “cult
of ant worship.
" Mumford notes that ants, some sixty million years ago, had
developed all the major institutions of civilization, including royalty, con-
quest, division of labor, and a caste system.14
Why a way of life that was less satisfying than that which it replaced (and
which mimicked the structure of a sixty—million—year-old totalitarian ant soci-
ety) was hailed by historians as an unqualified triumph, and why the human
race has endured it so long is for Mumford one of the puzzles of history.

THE WORSHIP OF QUANTITIES, THE DISMISSAL OF ALL ELSE

The world of machines is one of mass and motion, size and speed. This is
only a fraction of the world occupied by living organisms. Only a tiny part of


This is why EU is so threatening to this zenith of institutional control and society. The power of realising the electrical observations - and their common sense basis which is of course missed by the institutional society - is either completely ignored by those completely immersed in institutional society, or it seems "scary" to those who still have partial commonsense, because it reveals the nature of what they have not (yet) questioned in society.

If you notice the sentence "This daily participation in meaningful activity is exactly what is missing in the modern machine economy" then you might think of Wikipedia, or even better Linux and Open Source that DOES produce that sense of meaningful activity and inclusiveness. But that still happens using machines. Look how controversial Wikipedia and Open Source were to many people (at least initially). Then think what EU seems like to some people with it's strong message of COSMIC participation, meaningful connections and inclusiveness and you might get an idea of what is going on here.

BTW, I highly recommend the rest of Levine's book, it's well worth getting hold of. If you are wondering who Mumford is then he wrote The Myth of the Machine: Technics and Human Development, 1966, and The Myth of the Machine: The Pentagon of Power.
Exploration and discovery without honest investigation of "extraordinary" results leads to a Double Bind (Bateson, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_bind ) that creates loss of hope and depression. No more Double Binds !
User avatar
Phorce
 
Posts: 228
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2010 1:54 am
Location: The Phorce


Return to Electric Universe - Resources

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest