Recommend a Book?

Books, journal articles, web pages, and news reports that can help to clarify the history and promise of the Electric Universe hypothesis.

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Recommend a Book?

Unread postby willendure » Wed Jun 29, 2016 3:16 pm

Hearing about some EU books on this thread: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=16370, and other and thought I'd start a recommend a book thread.

Need some good reading material for my holidays. Books only, not papers or online stuff. What would you recommend and why?
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Re: Recommend a Book?

Unread postby fosborn_ » Mon Jul 04, 2016 4:20 pm

I was excited to see EU related ideas applied to weather, and come away with new understanding of the current lack of science in weather theory. It was fun reading them.
The first book was a unique writing style that was engaging. But the second book was more indepth I think.
WHAT GOES UP: Storm Theory: What meteorologists believe but won't debate, discuss, or even doubt (Solving Tornadoes: Hacking the Atmosphere Book 1)James McGinn

Vortex Phase: The Discovery of the Spin That Underlies the Twist: A Simple Solution to Large, Violent Tornadoes (Solving Tornadoes: Hacking the Atmosphere Book 2) James McGinn
The most exciting phrase to hear in science,
the one that heralds new discoveries,
is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny...'
Isaac Asimov
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Re: Recommend a Book?

Unread postby hyrumpoint0 » Fri Jul 08, 2016 7:12 am

willendure wrote:Hearing about some EU books on this thread: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=16370, and other and thought I'd start a recommend a book thread.

Need some good reading material for my holidays. Books only, not papers or online stuff. What would you recommend and why?


Of course I would have to recommend my book, Silent Subversion I: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AS75NY2#navbar, but it's a novel and you're probably looking for nonfiction. Here's my reason for thinking it's relevant.

It's a story about some unconventional engineers who develop a new technology and how I think the government might react. There are other books out there with the same theme, but in the Silent Subversion story, the characters are smart about it... :o IMHO....
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Re: Recommend a Book?

Unread postby willendure » Tue Jul 12, 2016 1:57 am

Fiction or non-fiction, I enjoy both.
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Re: Recommend a Book?

Unread postby willendure » Tue Jul 12, 2016 2:05 am

On holiday I read "Road to the Stars", Yuri Gagarin's account of his part in the man's first flight into orbit.

The first chapter is fascinating, his account of the second world war as a boy. The fascists came through his village on their way into Russia, and back through it on their way out defeated.

Of relevance to some discussions on here, about whether or not the stars are visible in space (??!). He writes:

"Through the portholes I saw a diamond-field of shining, bright, cold stars."

His eyes were tested very thoroughly no less than seven times before he was selected to train as a cosmonaut.

The later parts of the book are a bit of a drawn out eulogy to the wonders and successes of communism - no doubt the book had to pass the official censors but you get the impression he did not struggle to find the necessary words of admiration. He was after all, one of its chosen ones and enjoyed being at the pinnacle of the system and far away from those who were crushed by it.

A fascinating read though, from the start up until the first space flight.
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Re: Recommend a Book?

Unread postby willendure » Tue Jul 12, 2016 2:19 am

I also read "Einstein's Master Work. 1915 and the General Theory of Relativity" by John Gribbin. A popularization of the general theory, as well as an account of Einstein's life and other work - the special theory, the photo-electric effect, and work on establishing the existence of atoms.

There is a fair amount of GR bashing on here. Amongst other things this well written account discusses the evidence in favor of the theory and the degree of accuracy to which it has been tested. Indeed, the author states that if the theory is wrong and needs to be improved, a replacement theory will have to build on top of it and capture its rules accurately not throw it away and replace it with something completely different - in a similar way to how Newtons laws are preserved within GR for weaker 'flat' fields.

I know folks here like to think that light being bent as it passes by the sun is caused only by deflection in the plasma. Two things to say about that. The first is that there are other better tests of GR that have been performed. The second is that the light deflection by GR around the sun is only very small - perhaps it is also deflected by the plasma which may explain why that particular test of GR has produced some fairly variable results.

An excellent read and not at all hard to follow. I don't subscribe to the 'electric only' camp of EU. Unless we uncover some deeper hidden connection between electricity and gravity, I am firmly in the gravity and electric camp with the outlook that the electrical side is being badly under represented.
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Re: Recommend a Book?

Unread postby fosborn_ » Sun Aug 14, 2016 4:09 pm

fosborn_ wrote:I was excited to see EU related ideas applied to weather, and come away with new understanding of the current lack of science in weather theory. It was fun reading them.
The first book was a unique writing style that was engaging. But the second book was more indepth I think.
WHAT GOES UP: Storm Theory: What meteorologists believe but won't debate, discuss, or even doubt (Solving Tornadoes: Hacking the Atmosphere Book 1)James McGinn

Vortex Phase: The Discovery of the Spin That Underlies the Twist: A Simple Solution to Large, Violent Tornadoes (Solving Tornadoes: Hacking the Atmosphere Book 2) James McGinn


I really have to un-recommend this book. The ideas didn't hold water... :cry:
The links James posted to google groups revieled alot of weakness in the concept. But it was vary entertaining and I learned how ignorant I am of weather theory. But its something I'm vary excited about now.
The most exciting phrase to hear in science,
the one that heralds new discoveries,
is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny...'
Isaac Asimov
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Location: Kansas

Re: Recommend a Book?

Unread postby jimmcginn » Sun Aug 14, 2016 7:19 pm

fosborn_ wrote:
fosborn_ wrote:I was excited to see EU related ideas applied to weather, and come away with new understanding of the current lack of science in weather theory. It was fun reading them.
The first book was a unique writing style that was engaging. But the second book was more indepth I think.
WHAT GOES UP: Storm Theory: What meteorologists believe but won't debate, discuss, or even doubt (Solving Tornadoes: Hacking the Atmosphere Book 1)James McGinn

Vortex Phase: The Discovery of the Spin That Underlies the Twist: A Simple Solution to Large, Violent Tornadoes (Solving Tornadoes: Hacking the Atmosphere Book 2) James McGinn


I really have to un-recommend this book. The ideas didn't hold water... :cry:
The links James posted to google groups revieled alot of weakness in the concept. But it was vary entertaining and I learned how ignorant I am of weather theory. But its something I'm vary excited about now.


When you started comparing my thinking to Charles Chandler's I knew you weren't following my argument. My theory relies heavily on fluid dynamics, chaos theory, and an advanced understanding of H2O. Charles just took standard meteorology unexamined and then made some rather extravagant claims about electricity being involved. There are no similarities between our respective theories. Charles is still caught up in the superstitious notions that have become standard meteorology. That means he takes a lot of things for granted that I would never take for granted.

Frank, you fell for the same pseudoscience that everybody falls for. You were confused by water. Everybody is. And so you took the easy way out and just agreed to the same nonsense that everybody else religiously agrees to.

The fact is, Frank, you can't explain what is wrong with my theory and you can't explain what is right about any alternative to my theory.



That is something I would never do. I refuse to take the easy way out.
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Re: Recommend a Book?

Unread postby willendure » Fri Aug 19, 2016 8:23 am

I think EU proponents will like the work of E M Mculloch - not because it is electrical in nature, but because it challenges mainstream physics and because Mculloch is very much an empiricist in the tradition of Ernst Mach. He does not believe in theories with adjustable parameters or hypothesising about things that we cannot observe and know to exist.

http://physicsfromtheedge.blogspot.co.uk/

Physics from the edge discusses his own ideas about how inertia is quantized. He has applied his theory, which does not have adjustable parameters to areas such as the Pioneer anomoly, the flby anomaly, the EM drive, and the big one - the problem of galaxy rotation being too fast for the amount of observable mass. His theories hold up very well against the observed data, which is all the more remarkable given how odd they are and that they lack adjustable parameters to enable them to simply be fit to the data whatever it may be.

For an empiricist, his theories are strange indeed. He claims that accelerating a mass causes a so-called Rindler horizon to appear in the far off distance, and for the existence of that horizon on one side and the Hubble horizon on the other side of the accelerated mass to act in such a way that more wavelengths are possible on the one side of the mass than on the other. This is turn gives rise to a Casimir effect that is the source of the force that resists acceleration and gives rise to inertial mass. This explains the name of his theory, "Modified inertia by a Hubble-scale Casimir effect" or MiHSc.

There is absolutely no mention of electrical universe concepts in his work - certainly not to explain galactic rotation in terms of electrical forces. He does a good job of explaining why both dark matter and dark energy are bogus concepts and both are well accounted for by his work.

The use of the Rindler horizon as an important part of his work is quite startling to me. It suggests that the reality we inhabit is not fundamentally an electrical one so much as a holographic one where information itself plays a role in determining the mechanics of nature.

I highly recommend "Physics from the Edge", it is well written, a good read and utterly fascinating, just don't expect it to confirm your 'electrical universe' viewpoint. It will however, re-enforce your EU attitude that present day physics has got some of the fundamentals badly wrong and that these things can be successfully challenged by a small player working within the field.
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Re: Recommend a Book?

Unread postby fosborn_ » Fri Sep 16, 2016 10:37 pm

I just started a free PDF book at weather.org
http://www.weather.org/singer/index.asp
The Revolution in the Understanding of Weather.
Singer's Lock. Based be on established science. I might not get rope a doped on this one.
The most exciting phrase to hear in science,
the one that heralds new discoveries,
is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny...'
Isaac Asimov
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Location: Kansas


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