Asteroids

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Hubble Sees Suspected Asteroid Collision

Unread postby solrey » Wed Feb 03, 2010 1:24 pm

Right, because the full URL is (minus http):
science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2010/02feb_asteroidcollision.htm?list80669

But the URL that shows up as a link in a comment is truncated like this due to auto-link creation triggered by the http part.
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2010 ... ?list80669

The standard search window goes for an exact match of the URL, or character string, you entered and won't find it because it's truncated in the posts.

So when searching for a URL, click on Advanced Search below the standard search window, then enter the URL in the "Search for Keywords" text box and select the option "Search for any terms". The other options don't really matter in this case so just go to the bottom of the page for the "search" button.

If you use the full URL you'll get something like this
Search found 183 matches: (http|science|nasa|gov|headlines|y2010|02feb|asteroidcollision|htm|list80669)


Hint:
You can narrow down the results by eliminating the front end of the URL, which would be common to many links, when you enter it into the search window:
/y2010/02feb_asteroidcollision.htm?list80669

This should be the result:
Search found 14 matches: (y2010|02feb|asteroidcollision|htm|list80669)


Hope that helps.
:)
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It's official: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs

Unread postby kc0itf » Sat Mar 06, 2010 8:33 pm

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20100304/sc_nm/us_dinosaurs_asteroid

Translation: it's now officially DOGMA!!! We thank you for your cooperation... :roll:

Which DOESN'T explain Ted Holden's gravity problem... :lol:
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Re: It's official: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs

Unread postby GaryN » Sat Mar 06, 2010 11:05 pm

For some reason, I immediately thought "Climategate". Their turn will come. ;-)
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: It's official: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:03 am

The perspective of our future keeps on changing. And so does our view on the past.

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/solarsystem/meteors-ez.html

Meteorites (the pieces that make it to Earth) were long ago thought to be cast down as gifts from angels. Others thought the gods were displaying their anger. As late as the 17th century, many believed they fell from thunderstorms (they were nicknamed "thunderstones"). Many scientists were skeptical that stones could fall from the clouds or the heavens, and often they simply didn't believe the accounts of people who claimed to have seen such things.

So, it took a while for scientists to believe in astroids and meteors. But this is hilarious; "they simply didn't believe the accounts of people who claimed to have seen such things"
Thats not empiricisme, thats not acknowledging reality.

Or how about this little historical fact.
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2010-01/google-map-images-confirm-aborigine-mythology

Google Earth Images Confirm Mythological Meteor Impact

Australian Aborigine mythology begins in a period known as the "dream time", before the emergence of humanity. Many stories about the dream time include legends about stars, gods, or rocks falling from the sky. And new research utilizing Google Earth surveys of the outback show that many of those myths may actually be historically accurate.


Is science finally catching up?

further reading ; http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/news/3225/aboriginal-dreaming-story-leads-meteorite-crater



I wonder what the next 'official' dogma will be in the future. Enormous electric discharges caused earthquakes, climatechange and flooding and therefor the distinction of dinosaurs?

;-)
Last edited by MrAmsterdam on Sun Mar 07, 2010 11:00 am, edited 2 times in total.
Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -Nikola Tesla -1934
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Re: It's official: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs

Unread postby nick c » Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:53 am

It's official! just like black holes, dark matter, dark energy, the big bang.
The first sentence of the article says it all:
A giant asteroid smashing into Earth is the only plausible explanation for the extinction of the dinosaurs, a global scientific team said on Thursday, hoping to settle a row that has divided experts for decades.

"the only plausible explanation," translates as "within the constraints of our uniformitarian context, what else could it be?"
Too bad they don't consider the EU "plausible," if they did, they would have many more possibilities to consider.

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Re: It's official: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs

Unread postby redeye » Wed Mar 10, 2010 2:21 pm

A giant asteroid smashing into Earth is the only plausible explanation for the extinction of the dinosaurs, a global scientific team said on Thursday, hoping to settle a row that has divided experts for decades.


from wiki

Deccan Traps
Main article: Deccan Traps
Before 2000, arguments that the Deccan Traps flood basalts caused the extinction were usually linked to the view that the extinction was gradual, as the flood basalt events were thought to have started around 68 Ma and lasted for over 2 million years. The most recent evidence shows that the traps erupted over 800,000 years spanning the K–T boundary, and therefore may be responsible for the extinction and the delayed biotic recovery thereafter.[82]

The Deccan Traps could have caused extinction through several mechanisms, including the release of dust and sulfuric aerosols into the air which might have blocked sunlight and thereby reduced photosynthesis in plants. In addition, Deccan Trap volcanism might have resulted in carbon dioxide emissions which would have increased the greenhouse effect when the dust and aerosols cleared from the atmosphere.[83]

In the years when the Deccan Traps hypothesis was linked to a slower extinction, Luis Alvarez (who died in 1988) replied that paleontologists were being misled by sparse data. While his assertion was not initially well-received, later intensive field studies of fossil beds lent weight to his claim. Eventually, most paleontologists began to accept the idea that the mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous were largely or at least partly due to a massive Earth impact. However, even Walter Alvarez has acknowledged that there were other major changes on Earth even before the impact, such as a drop in sea level and massive volcanic eruptions that produced the Indian Deccan Traps, and these may have contributed to the extinctions.[84]

Multiple impact event
Several other craters also appear to have been formed about the time of the K–T boundary. This suggests the possibility of near simultaneous multiple impacts, perhaps from a fragmented asteroidal object, similar to the Shoemaker-Levy 9 cometary impact with Jupiter. In addition to the 180-km (112 mi) Chicxulub Crater, there is the 24-km (15 mi) Boltysh crater in Ukraine (65.17 ± 0.64 Ma), the 20-km (12 mi) Silverpit crater, a suspected impact crater in the North Sea (60–65 Ma), and the controversial and much bigger 600-km (370 mi) Shiva crater. Any other craters that might have formed in the Tethys Ocean would have been obscured by tectonic events like the relentless northward drift of Africa and India.[85][86][87]

[edit] Maastrichtian sea-level regression
There is clear evidence that sea levels fell in the final stage of the Cretaceous by more than at any other time in the Mesozoic era. In some Maastrichtian stage rock layers from various parts of the world, the later ones are terrestrial; earlier ones represent shorelines and the earliest represent seabeds. These layers do not show the tilting and distortion associated with mountain building, therefore, the likeliest explanation is a "regression", that is, a drop in sea level. There is no direct evidence for the cause of the regression, but the explanation which is currently accepted as the most likely is that the mid-ocean ridges became less active and therefore sank under their own weight.[7][88]

A severe regression would have greatly reduced the continental shelf area, which is the most species-rich part of the sea, and therefore could have been enough to cause a marine mass extinction. However research concludes that this change would have been insufficient to cause the observed level of ammonite extinction. The regression would also have caused climate changes, partly by disrupting winds and ocean currents and partly by reducing the Earth's albedo and therefore increasing global temperatures.[69]

Marine regression also resulted in the loss of epeiric seas, such as the Western Interior Seaway of North America. The loss of these seas greatly altered habitats, removing coastal plains that ten million years before had been host to diverse communities such as are found in rocks of the Dinosaur Park Formation. Another consequence was an expansion of freshwater environments, since continental runoff now had longer distances to travel before reaching oceans. While this change was favorable to freshwater vertebrates, those that prefer marine environments, such as sharks, suffered.[58]

[edit] Multiple causes
In a review article, J. David Archibald and David E. Fastovsky discussed a scenario combining three major postulated causes: volcanism, marine regression, and extraterrestrial impact. In this scenario, terrestrial and marine communities were stressed by the changes in and loss of habitats. Dinosaurs, as the largest vertebrates, were the first to be affected by environmental changes, and their diversity declined. At the same time, particulate materials from volcanism cooled and dried areas of the globe. Then, an impact event occurred, causing collapses in photosynthesis-based food chains, both in the already-stressed terrestrial food chains and in the marine food chains. The major difference between this hypothesis and the single-cause hypotheses is that its proponents view the suggested single causes as either not sufficient in strength to cause the extinctions or not likely to produce the taxonomic pattern of the extinction.[58]



Large scale extinction events correlate better with large igneous provinces than impact events. But there have been plenty of both that do not link with any extinction events. Is it just fashionable to say the science is settled?

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Asteroid Missed Earth This Week

Unread postby StevenJay » Fri Apr 09, 2010 4:02 pm

Yeah, but look at that bea-u-ti-ful coma! Whacha got to say about that, Mr. Hawking? . . . Nothing, huh? :roll:
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Re: Asteroid Missed Earth This Week

Unread postby solrey » Fri Apr 09, 2010 6:14 pm

Holy moly stevenjay. Thanks for posting that.

Remember that CME that hit Earth on the 5th through the 6th? That asteroid must have caught it too as it was approaching. I think the distance was more like within 500,000 kilometers though, not 50,000 miles.

On the sixth from JPL's Asteroid Watch.

This latest trajectory indicates that the closest approach for asteroid 2010 GA6 will be just slightly beyond the moon's orbit, about 434,000 kilometers (270,000 miles) from Earth. The time of closest approach will be 7:06 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time on April 8 (2:06 U.T.C. on April 9).


According to it's position on their diagram it would have passed through the magnetotail at that distance. The magnetotail is filled with "hot" energetic electrons and gives the moon a negative charge as it passes through during full moon.

So the asteroid accumulates a positive charge from the CME right before it enters the negatively charged magnetotail leaving virtually no time for the charge to dissipate and so becomes a mini comet. Amazing proof for electric comet theory, imo. Great tpod candidate.
:D

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Re: Asteroid Missed Earth This Week

Unread postby jjohnson » Sat Apr 10, 2010 10:36 pm

Astounding to see an 'asteroid' photo (some of the darkest bodies in the solar system) being filmed in a patch of blue day-lit sky between white clouds! Solrey, I think you are spot on in your explanation of what probably has occurred. I hope some of the many gizmos in space with cameras manage to get a better series of photos of it. One wonders what the forthcoming explanations will be like, or if they will take Sergeant Rock's wise advice to the combat-happy doggies in Easy company, and "just keep duckin'!"

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Re: Asteroid Missed Earth This Week

Unread postby Jarvamundo » Sun Apr 11, 2010 7:24 pm

Awesome stuff guys, as usual.
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Re: Asteroid Missed Earth This Week

Unread postby Jarvamundo » Sun Apr 11, 2010 8:38 pm

ok... hmm...

http://www.dailygalaxy.com/.a/6a00d8341bf7f753ef0133ec8d6aef970b-pi
That daytime photograph is a comet no?

Stephen Hawking believes that one of the major factors in the possible scarcity of intelligent life in our galaxy is the high probability of an asteroid or comet (image left) colliding with inhabited planets.
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Re: Asteroid Missed Earth This Week

Unread postby Jarvamundo » Mon Apr 12, 2010 12:21 am

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Re: Asteroid Missed Earth This Week

Unread postby jjohnson » Sat Apr 17, 2010 8:59 pm

I was astounded by the photograph of what was designated a meteor (2009 DD45) being photgraphed with a coma and a tail, so went looking for confirmatory text and/or images. Nada!

So, went back to the article and finally figured out that they do not actually say that the lead photo is that meteor - it is only an illustration:
...the high probability of an asteroid or comet (image left) colliding with inhabited planets.

Not what I interpreted at all in my rush to read all about it! No coma, no bright nucleus - just another darkish chunk whizzing by in the dark. Pretty close, though.

-and we missed you, too, little DD 2009! ;)
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Re: Asteroid Missed Earth This Week

Unread postby webolife » Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:25 pm

Thanks for posting that clarification, jjohnson. I also found the contradictory info when researching this image.
It would have been an amazing confirmation of the EU comet theory, however, to have an asteroid become a comet as it passed into/through the earth's magnetosphere! Too bad. Probably that daytime image was of McNaught. I followed Comet Holmes through Perseus at night with my telescope for several days, just one of many examples of the indistinctions between an asteroid and a comet, which indistinctions do support the EU!
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Itokawa asteroid dust and satellite Hayabusa

Unread postby MattEU » Mon Jun 14, 2010 3:39 am

the Japanese satellite Hayabusa has just crash landed (as intended!) its return to earth after a journey of over 1.25 billion miles. here is a great video of its re entry into earths atmosphere http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfYA4f-AIL0

what will they find that surprises them? most stuff i guess

here is a link http://www.hayabusa.isas.jaxa.jp/e/index_55.html to the project page for Itokawa/Hayabusa with an explanation of stuff that they hope to use some of the data for

[Notes]
(1) The majority of the sunlight reaching the asteroid Itokawa is absorbed on the surface,
and warm ups the object. Consequently, Itokawa re-emits this heat energy as bright infrared
light which was in turn observed by AKARI. On the other hand, only a small faction of the
incident sunlight is reflected from Itokawa which explains why the asteroid is so very faint in
visible light.

(2) The temperature of asteroids is determined by the balance between the input energy
from the incident sunlight and the output energy from the reprocessed heat energy emitted
as infrared radiation from the asteroid. Computer models that calculate the temperature
distribution in asteroids considering their shapes, rotations, and surface conditions have
been investigated. Observations in the mid-infrared wavelength range provide information
about the infrared light emitted from the asteroids. By comparing the infrared observational
data with that expected from the model calculations, we can derive information about the
asteroid such as its size. Additionally, we can improve the model calculations themselves by
utilizing the infrared observational data of very well studied asteroids such as Itokawa.

The improvement of thermophysical models of asteroids such as Itokawa would be useful
especially for estimating the size of potentially hazardous asteroids which may be discovered
in the future. The new AKARI data will be perfect for improving the model of Itokawa itself
and for increasing the confidence in the model predictions for other near-Earth objects.
After validating current thermophysical models on the well-studied Itokawa, it will now be
possible to determine the sizes of these bodies easily and accurately. We believe the new
AKARI data will also allow us to study in more detail how the surface properties influence
the infrared spectrum of small bodies, or how to derive surface properties from infrared
observations of other targets.
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