Mars - Water

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Mars - Water

Unread postby Ben D » Tue Jun 09, 2015 2:06 pm

Thanks Gary...I will have to defer to your superior electrical knowledge wrt this matter. I would never have guessed it was electrical, but will bookmark this subject for further investigation out of interest...so much to learn..so little time... :D
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Re: Mars - Water

Unread postby GaryN » Wed Jun 10, 2015 11:31 am

This would make for an experiment that C.J.Ransom should be able to set up. Electrostatic fragmentation, using a slab or sheet of sandstone with a suitable surface, should produce the fine dust. Introducing fast rise time pulses, electrodynamic fragmentation should produce the larger, angular pieces, and perhaps the more rounded, larger pieces that roll further down-slope from the edge of the ledge would be dominant with a certain mix of ES and ED forces?
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Flowing water on mars?

Unread postby Zyxzevn » Sat Sep 26, 2015 7:28 am

Nasa is going to announce some new discovery on mars, and the rumor is that it is about flowing water. Instead I hope that they find more fossilized bacteria from mars.

There's growing speculation NASA is about to announce it has discovered flowing water on Mars

The image in the article shows how some liquid like substance causes erosion on the side of a crater.
I suspect it might be CO2 instead, but water is a popular chemical nowadays.

Another possible occurrence here.
More ** from zyxzevn at: Paradigm change and C@
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Re: Flowing water on mars?

Unread postby IgorTesla » Sat Sep 26, 2015 9:06 am

Last week they also announce the discovery of the largest 'black hole' and now this ?
What about the Rosetta mission, where are the promised high detailed images that were supposed to be publicly available ?

They will convince the majority of the validity of their findings by propagating science this way.
Working like a true indoctrination machine they keep holding on to falsified information and calculations.
Sorry to say this but i can no longer trust NASA or any of it's followers simply because they don't have a clue on what they are talking about.
It's like a dreaming child who still has to realize that the dream stopped and he has to step out of his dream ...

Pity they get all the funds, they give science a (very) bad name by excluding several of the most important fields of expertise.(Plasma physics, Electro engineers, Bio matter specialists etc...)
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Water on Mars? Maybe.

Unread postby gocrew » Mon Sep 28, 2015 12:13 pm

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technolog ... ailsignout

The evidence seems to be a bit less strong than the article wants you to think, and it doesn't really affect EU theory broadly. It does, however, mean a little something for Thornhill's scenario of the capture of Saturn. In his scenario, Mars would have had to have water at one time.
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Re: Water on Mars? Maybe.

Unread postby BronzeDragon » Tue Sep 29, 2015 5:15 pm

They've discovered water on Mars so many times that I've stopped paying attention. Image
"I'd take the awe of understanding over the awe of ignorance any day." (Douglas Adams, "The Salmon of Doubt")
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Re: Water on Mars? Maybe.

Unread postby GaryN » Tue Sep 29, 2015 7:22 pm

The rivulets — if that's what they are, since the evidence for their existence is indirect...


Spectral analysis is not such an exacting science as is commonly thought, there are many ways the data can be affected. There are millions of spectral lines and more are identified all the time. In many cases, they make assumptions based on what they believe should be present, and then look for lines that support their assumptions.

Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that recurring slope lineae form as a result of contemporary water activity on Mars.

http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/vaop ... o2546.html
... yet no direct evidence for either liquid water or hydrated salts has been found

It is still a hypothesis.
Even if it is water though:
If there is liquid water on Mars, no one—not even NASA—can get anywhere near it

http://qz.com/512974/if-there-is-liquid ... e-near-it/
And:
Trouble for Mars Lifers
Pesky Perchlorates All Over Mars
The chlorine compounds not only erase carbon compounds by converting them to gas, they make living on Mars dangerous. The perchlorates and other chemicals like gympsum get into fine dust that blows all over the planet, making it a dangerous place to send humans.

http://crev.info/2013/05/trouble-for-ma ... PQ2z7.dpuf
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Water on Mars? Maybe.

Unread postby +EyeOn-W-ANeed2Know » Wed Sep 30, 2015 11:05 am

IMHO, the conclusion would be much more believable if one of the rovers was right there taking readings & samples...
but a "hydrologic brine flow" explanation based on sensors & images from the Orbiter is stretching it.


So the new culprits are "salts" ????
I find that very interesting as the acid/base ratio of various salts have significant effects on the pH conditions of the soil...
and I'm pretty sure I don't have to mention to EU readers how easily pH relates to charge states.

I am much more inclined to think this is electrically driven.
When one considers that the "mysterious" dust devils that lift particulates miles up into the thin Martian atmosphere are also common during the times this phenomena is active, I cannot help but ask:
What observation might be expected when electrically charged winds blow across pH differentiated soils on a slope? :D
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Re: Water on Mars? Maybe.

Unread postby Infinion » Fri Oct 09, 2015 11:54 am

Now NASA is saying they've confirmed that there were ancient lakes of water on Mars. That's a pretty huge step in the hypothesis

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4734
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Re: Water on Mars? Maybe.

Unread postby Frantic » Fri Oct 09, 2015 4:55 pm

This is how the article ends:

This is a good time to go back to reevaluate all our assumptions. Something is missing somewhere.
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Re: Mars - Water

Unread postby nick c » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:57 am

It seems that at least some of mainstream planetary scientists are somewhat backing off on the claim of H2O in liquid form being found on Mars.
http://phys.org/news/2015-12-mars-gulli ... =item-menu
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Re: Mars - Water

Unread postby Steve Smith » Wed Dec 23, 2015 10:20 am

And...the idea that Mars was once warm and wet has been challenged for years:

Study challenges theory of Mars' warmer, watery past - September 2011

A Pattern of Forces

In the March 5, 2007 edition of Scientific American, it was reported that most of what has been interpreted as water-based erosion on Mars could have come from “dry avalanches” of dirt. The authors expressed serious doubts about whether observations have demonstrated any effects caused by liquid water.

Allan Treiman, a geologist from Houston's Lunar and Planetary Institute wrote: "The idea of it being liquid water was a very reasonable hypothesis to start with. From my standpoint liquid water hasn't been proved at all."
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Re: Mars - Water

Unread postby GaryN » Fri Jul 29, 2016 2:41 pm

Mars Gullies Likely Not Formed by Liquid Water
The findings showed no mineralogical evidence for abundant liquid water or its by-products, thus pointing to mechanisms other than the flow of water -- such as the freeze and thaw of carbon dioxide frost -- as being the major drivers of recent gully evolution.

http://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/mars-gu ... quid-water

Surely there must be some NASA scientists who are thinking about electricity? Perhaps they dare not speak its name if they want to keep their jobs?
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Mars - Water

Unread postby Ben D » Fri Sep 09, 2016 4:37 pm

I can't believe that now the possible evidence of water is nearby...that they are going to run away without establishing 100% it is water?

Curiosity Rover’s Proximity To Possible Water Raises Planetary Protection Concerns
9 Sep , 2016

After four years on Mars, the Curiosity rover has made some pretty impressive discoveries. These have ranged from characterizing what Mars’ atmosphere was like billions of years ago to discovering organic molecules and methane there today. But arguably the biggest discovery Curiosity has made has been uncovering evidence of warm, flowing water on Mars’ surface.

Unfortunately, now faced with what could be signs of water directly in its path, NASA is forced to enact strict protocols. These signs take the form of dark streaks that have been observed along the sloping terrain of Aeolis Mons (aka. Mount Sharp), which the rover has been preparing to climb. In order to prevent contamination, the rover must avoid any contact with them, which could mean a serious diversion.

These sorts of dark streaks are known as recurring slope lineae (RSLs) because of their tendency to appear, fade away and re­appear seasonally on steep slopes. The first RSLs were reported in 2011 by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in a variety of locations, and are now seen as proof that water still periodically flows on Mars (albiet in the form of salt-water).

Since that time, a total of 452 possible RSLs have been observed, mostly in Mars’s southern mid-latitudes or near the equator (particularly in Mars’ Valles Marineris). They are generally a few meters wide, and appear to lengthen at the warmest times of the year, then fade during the colder times.


http://www.universetoday.com/130698/curiosity-rovers-proximity-possible-water-raises-planetary-protection-concerns/
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Re: Mars - Water

Unread postby Metryq » Sat Sep 10, 2016 2:09 am

Ben D wrote:I can't believe that now the possible evidence of water is nearby...that they are going to run away without establishing 100% it is water?

Move along. Nothing to see here.
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