Electric Jupiter

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

Moderators: MGmirkin, bboyer

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby remelic » Fri May 14, 2010 7:24 am

The connection between the Sun and Earth may be way different the Sun/Jupiter. The currents may be completely different in strength or frequency so this would make a difference already. Earth is closer to the sun and therefore in a more dense magnetic flux then Jupiter. Magnetic Flux, Output plasma and Input energy...would all play a role in the energy that other planets receive/give. I could be out on a limb here. ;)

If the sun's output is increasing then the input is increasing also? No
Secrets of Edward Leedskalnin
“Like a flash of lightning and in an instant the truth was revealed.” - Nikola Tesla
Electricity = Magnetism x Speed of Light Squared... Thats what he really meant.
User avatar
remelic
 
Posts: 203
Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 11:40 am
Location: Canada

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby Siggy_G » Fri May 14, 2010 8:14 am

remelic wrote:If the sun's output is increasing then the input is increasing also? No


Oh, I meant an increase in measured electric current around the poles compared to further out surroundings, which could indicate an incoming electric current pinched towards the Sun's poles. I didn't refer to an increased tendency the last years. :)
Last edited by Siggy_G on Fri May 14, 2010 8:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Siggy_G
Moderator
 
Posts: 501
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:05 am
Location: Norway

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby Siggy_G » Fri May 14, 2010 8:17 am

Solar radiation graph: http://i.space.com/images/solar_radiation_030320_02.jpg
Surface Temperature graph, Earth: http://www.global-warming-and-the-climate.com/images/ground-temperature-trends.gif (the graph can of course be discussed, but could be a representative one)

From the graphs I get:

Solar radiation (watts per square meter) increase between 1985 and 1995 (solar minimums):
From 1365.2 to 1366.0. That ratio equals: 1.00058 -> + 0.06 %

Surface Temperature Anomaly increase between 1985 and 1995:

From - 0.1 to 0.2 degree Celsius. Put in a realistic scenario of a summer day of 20 degree Celsius, and considering its actual energy (Kelvin, -273,2 C) we get:

From 293.1 to 293.4 Kelvin. This ration equals: 1.0010 -> + 0.1 %

This seems very much related... When there still is statistical inaccuracies with the temperature
measurements, these numbers/ratios may be even closer related.
User avatar
Siggy_G
Moderator
 
Posts: 501
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:05 am
Location: Norway

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby ElecGeekMom » Fri May 14, 2010 8:35 am

remelic wrote:The Sun's input energy has dropped so I would imagine that this effects all other planets since they are all connected to the sun and depend on it. So the energy reaching Jupiter from the sun is weaker then normal. (Sun having input energy is guesswork but based on my research the Sun gets energy from an external source...the galaxy).


And, by the same token, planets that are farther from the sun and its energy are also closer to the cosmic rays and their energy. So perhaps when the sun is quieter, the greater influence from cosmic rays ends up manifesting differently on the various planets in our solar system?
ElecGeekMom
 
Posts: 328
Joined: Tue May 27, 2008 9:01 am

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby remelic » Fri May 14, 2010 8:43 am

I've noticed that the Sun heats up when ever it has a lack of Magnetic influence. The reason for this may be that a stronger magnetic flux at the sun holds back more thermal energy or makes it travel slower and cools faster then normal. So with a relaxed magnetic energy the heat is free to flow, so to speak.
Secrets of Edward Leedskalnin
“Like a flash of lightning and in an instant the truth was revealed.” - Nikola Tesla
Electricity = Magnetism x Speed of Light Squared... Thats what he really meant.
User avatar
remelic
 
Posts: 203
Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 11:40 am
Location: Canada

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby jjohnson » Fri May 14, 2010 9:00 am

Remelic: the probe you are referring to was probably the Ulysses explorer on the "solar polar" mission. It had a long elliptical orbit whose short axis was approximately vertical to the ecliptic, while the long axis brought it out to a near-Jupiter aphelion and looping over the solar poles during perihelion.
Jim
jjohnson
 
Posts: 1147
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:24 am
Location: Thurston County WA

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby remelic » Fri May 14, 2010 9:05 am

jjohnson wrote:Remelic: the probe you are referring to was probably the Ulysses explorer on the "solar polar" mission. It had a long elliptical orbit whose short axis was approximately vertical to the ecliptic, while the long axis brought it out to a near-Jupiter aphelion and looping over the solar poles during perihelion.
Jim


I'm sorry Jim :) but I don't think I mentioned a probe... unless you are saying that this has been measured? That would be cool. What info did they find out? when was this experiment conducted? So many questions now heh. Do you have a link to the results?

Thanks

Peter
Secrets of Edward Leedskalnin
“Like a flash of lightning and in an instant the truth was revealed.” - Nikola Tesla
Electricity = Magnetism x Speed of Light Squared... Thats what he really meant.
User avatar
remelic
 
Posts: 203
Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 11:40 am
Location: Canada

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby Siggy_G » Fri May 14, 2010 10:05 am

Thanks, Jim - it was the Ulysses probe that gathered quite a bit of data related to the Sun. Here's the site, with explanatins and results:

http://ulysses.jpl.nasa.gov/science/index.html
User avatar
Siggy_G
Moderator
 
Posts: 501
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:05 am
Location: Norway

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby folaht » Mon May 17, 2010 8:06 am

Here's what changed:
Image

Just a hunch:
Image
Since 1 % 1, 1 * 1 and 1 - 1 do not add up, we must conclude that 1 + 1 is 3.
folaht
 
Posts: 74
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 9:38 am

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby folaht » Mon May 17, 2010 9:04 am

Okay, bad hunch :oops: , I should have read the articles first and read that the stripe faded. Does anyone have footage of that?

Another question, are all the pretty coloured clouds on the same altitude, unlike clouds on earth, clouds on neptune and sunspots (lower) on the sun? If so, does a lighter shade mean a higher altitude?
Since 1 % 1, 1 * 1 and 1 - 1 do not add up, we must conclude that 1 + 1 is 3.
folaht
 
Posts: 74
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 9:38 am

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby folaht » Tue May 18, 2010 9:42 am

Image

Okay, so the white stripes are on top of the brown stripes, since the clouds of water are only guessed.
So it's the ammonia clouds, the white stripes that moved. Strange, because The middle white stripe doesn't seem to have changed, while in the north it seems to have thinned out.

The clouds are ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide, which cover the entire planet though being only 0.03% of the atmosphere. Hmmm... just like one can't see Nitrogen and Oxygen, but you can see water clouds which is only 1% of the earth's atmosphere?
Since 1 % 1, 1 * 1 and 1 - 1 do not add up, we must conclude that 1 + 1 is 3.
folaht
 
Posts: 74
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 9:38 am

Re: Jupiter Loses a Stripe

Unread postby remelic » Tue May 18, 2010 9:50 am

I wonder if Saturn, Uranus, or Neptune have anything to do with it? They are very close to a superior conjunction with each other. Maybe their energies are being distorted a bit causing cloud layers to shift or change? Maybe those other planets are also experiencing something similar?

Image
Tuesday May 18, 2010 10:51 MST.

Just a thought.

Peter
Secrets of Edward Leedskalnin
“Like a flash of lightning and in an instant the truth was revealed.” - Nikola Tesla
Electricity = Magnetism x Speed of Light Squared... Thats what he really meant.
User avatar
remelic
 
Posts: 203
Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 11:40 am
Location: Canada

Jupiter "bruise" - Caused by an Impact?

Unread postby Speed Metal » Sat Jun 05, 2010 4:33 am

Hello all,
I found this very interesting video that seems to have documented a "rogue asteroid" striking Jupiter:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... ed-by.html

Upon viewing the video, I couldn't help but notice that the impact looked like a discharge event of some kind occurred as there appears to be two distinct flashes.

But I do have some questions. If it was indeed an impact by an asteroid big enough to cause such an energetic effect:

a) why didn't anyone know it was going to happen? (as this video was a one of those "right-place-at-the-right-time" deals)
b) if there was an asteroid, would it not have taken on some cometary attributes?
c) could it have a been a pure plasma discharge event sans asteroid?

Since this my first post, I want to take this opportunity to thank the Thunderbolts crew for changing the way I look at the world and the universe and introducing me to Plasma Cosmology! Truly profound stuff, and for me, life changing!

Regards,

Speed Metal
Speed Metal
 
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 12:52 pm

Re: Jupiter "bruise" - Caused by an Impact?

Unread postby jjohnson » Sun Jun 06, 2010 12:06 pm

Welcome, Speed Metal! I viewed the video and interpreted it more as a slow frame rate or jitter than a distinct double flash. That is nothing more than one possible interpretation, of course.

Whether it could have been a meteor or even a cometary impact, versus an electric (i.e., plasma) discharge like lightning, is also up in the air for grabs. So far as I know, we do not normally monitor objects in space for their impact potential on planets beside our own, and usually only watch for known comets to appear or detect the unknown ones by serendipity (pure-d luck) - much like the amateur astronomers catching the flash on Jupiter.

If follow-up observations show dark upwelling as a result, it likely was an impactor, large enough to get down to a depth to stir up or create the dark material, like the Shoemaker-Levy event. Not seeing dark cloudiness can't rule out an impactor, if it disintegrated high in Jupiter's atmosphere. So, it's a puzzle with insufficient data to lead out of the possible interpretations. So far.

No one was actively looking for something which might have an impact trajectory relative to Jupiter. That says reams for amateur astronomers: the more eyes we have on the sky at any one time, the more likely the unexpected event is to be caught early, if at all. Nearly all the big telescopes, other than all-sky surveys, have other work in progress all the time, and are not just scanning around looking for something interesting. Many of those, in fact, are not looking in the visible spectrum, and likely most of the big eyes on the sky are looking at things other than our planets nearly all the time.

Finally, who's to say that the object didn't approach Jupiter from a position where it would have been hidden behind Jupiter for the final stages of flight, and would have appeared behind Jupiter's limb briefly as it approached line-of-sight to Earth, and then entered the atmosphere where it suddenly lit up and disappeared? You can see from the resolution that something even as large as a kilometer across would not likely to have been able to be resolved against Jupiter's face prior to entry heating and flaring.

Jim
jjohnson
 
Posts: 1147
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:24 am
Location: Thurston County WA

Re: Jupiter "bruise" - Caused by an Impact?

Unread postby Lloyd » Sun Jun 06, 2010 5:09 pm

* Here's the "rogue asteroid" impact with Jupiter:
Image
* And here's some of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts [the bright object on the right of Jupiter is the moon Io]:
Image
* Why would an asteroid or comet make a bright flash, when approaching a planet or moon? Air friction? When space capsules hit the atmosphere in returning to Earth, do they shine proportionally as bright as such impacts as the above?
* Some of the Tunguska TPODs mention the EU theory that a meteor from the Taurid meteor stream, which also contains comet Encke, I think, could have approached near enough to Earth to cause an electric discharge, which made a bright flash, and then disintegrated the meteor, so that no impact site is found on the ground.
* Could not the same thing be what happened in the images above?
* Here's the caption for the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impact event for the second image above.
According to a JPL web page: "... A time sequence of four frames showing the impact of the first of the 20 odd fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 into Jupiter. The upper left frame shows Jupiter just before impact. The bright object to the right is the closest Galilean satellite Io, and the fainter oval structure in the southern hemisphere is the Great Red Spot. The polar caps appear bright at the wavelength of the observations, 2.3 um [microns], which was selected to maximize contrast between the fireball and the jovian atmosphere. In the second frame, taken from Spain at about 10:15pm on July 16, the fireball appears above the southeast (lower left) limb of the planet. The fireball flared to maximum brightness within a few minutes, at which time its flux surpassed that of Io. The final frame shows Jupiter approximately 20 minutes later when the impact zone had faded somewhat. Further monitoring suggests that the bright zone is rotating slower than the cloud deck on Jupiter, implying that the fireball is high in jovian atmosphere. At the time of this writing nearly three hours after the event, remnant flux is still visible. These images were taken at the German-Spanish 3.5 meter telescope on Calar Alto in southern Spain, using the near infrared camera of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie in Heidelberg, Germany. ...".

* Here's a meteor from the Taurid stream from 1999 along with a short report below.
Image
According to an 8 July 1999 article in the London Telegraph by Paul Chapman, "... A SEARCH began yesterday for the remains of a large meteor that exploded over New Zealand's North Island with enough force to shake buildings, leaving a plume of blue smoke that covered hundreds of square miles. Falling debris from the meteor, which eyewitnesses said was as bright as the sun, was blamed for starting a forest fire near Napier, on the east coast. The spectacular explosion was seen by people on both sides of the North Island and from as far north as Auckland to Christchurch in the South Island. Witnesses said the fireball had a long, fiery tail. Airline pilots reported sightings and the meteor was picked up on radar by air-traffic controllers. Rodney Austin, information officer for the New Zealand Astronomical Society, said the meteor could have been as large as a railway locomotive. One scientist said it could prove difficult to find in New Zealand's rugged and sparsely populated landscape. ...".

* "As bright as the sun" sounds like electric discharge to me.
Lloyd
 
Posts: 4350
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 2:54 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Electric Universe - Planetary Science

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests