Electric Jupiter

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby solrey » Thu Jul 23, 2009 9:36 am

Nice find, stevenjay! The spot on Venus happens to be in the South polar region as well. They were both discovered on the 19th by astronomer observers of each planet. Also around that time, 10.7cm solar radio flux dipped to at, or near, a record low (since monitoring of that radio frequency began) following the most active sunspot so far in this cycle. :o

Coincidence? :?

FS3 wrote,
Another question would be where Jupiter's main moons where located exactly at the time that spots occured...


Yeah, I wonder about that myself.

Later this week, astronomers from Berkeley and around the world plan to conduct high-resolution visible and ultraviolet observations of the impact site using the Hubble Space Telescope's brand new Wide Field Camera 3. Ground-based facilities including the W. M. Keck telescope will also use adaptive optics to obtain much sharper infrared images of the impact's aftermath.


Looking forward to seeing those images! Whatever it is, it's pretty kewl. 8-)
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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby Osmosis » Thu Jul 23, 2009 8:36 pm

Has any check on extra IR emission from our southern hemisphere been done? Land of OZ been too hot, lately? :( :(
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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby solrey » Thu Jul 23, 2009 10:25 pm

Does a 7.8 mag. earthquake in New Zealand count?

http://www.geonet.org.nz/earthquake/quakes/3124785g.html

"Strange things are afoot at the Circle K" :lol:
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All Eyes on Jupiter!

Unread postby FS3 » Fri Jul 24, 2009 6:27 am

During the last two day the KECK and the IRTF on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, have been monitoring the Jupiter event.

http://keckobservatory.org/index.php/ne ... a_feature/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 225213.htm

While Leigh Fletcher still writes of an impact...

http://blogs.jpl.nasa.gov/?p=49

...we should watch out further wheather we cant find any similar occurances, like that on the Venus, during the time of 16th till 20th July - that could point more towards an electrically induced event, influencing our whole solar system.

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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby solrey » Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:03 am

New sunspot developing, but the magnetic polarity indicates a cycle 23 spot. Seems to be pretty far into cycle 24 for a previous cycle spot to be showing up.
Don't know if it's relevant, but it might fall into the "strange things are afoot" category. ;)

http://spaceweather.com/

It would be a huge shock to the solar physics world if this new spot is a member of the next cycle, 25. Probably not, but I'd love to see 'em squirm. :lol:
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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby solrey » Fri Jul 24, 2009 1:58 pm

Hubble shots of the dark spot on Jupiter are in! Pretty cool that it's the first actual observational image after the recent upgrades, taking a break from the calibration routine.

http://www.spacetelescope.org/news/html/heic0909.html

Image

There are shots of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 event from Hubble here:

http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/sl9/hst.html

Compared to this series of images of one of the SL9 impact "plumes" spanning 5 weeks, after five days this recent one appears to be very well defined and organized by comparison.

It could be an impact plume, not ruling that out at all, but it's kind of been morphing a bit like sunspots do, imho.
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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby mharratsc » Fri Jul 24, 2009 9:26 pm

I downloaded the TIFF of the closeup they took, and then blew that up a little bit more- it looks like two spots side-by-side. There were distinct purple discolorations around the outsides of the two spots, and on one end, curling out almost like a comma, but on the other spot the purple discoloration was bunched up on the inside curve facing closer to the adjacent spot- almost made me think it was doing the spiral galaxy thing at first...

I sure hope we get more shots of it at a later time to see if the spots are rotating around one another.

As to the comments regarding this spot, the spot on Venus, and the weird weather on Earth with the advent of the new solar cycle- has anyone heard of anything weird on the Martian front?

Also, the events on Venus and Jupiter are both southern hemisphere events- wasn't it the southern pole that David Talbott suspected was the location of the energetic events on Earth at the last cataclism? Would that mean the south poles of the planets receive more energy than the north usually? And if so- why might that be?

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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby solrey » Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:32 am

From the strange things are afoot files. New developments with the Jupiter spot as reported on the SpaceWeather site.

Something interesting is happening to the dark impact mark on Jupiter. Not only is it growing larger, but also "it seems to be developing two lobes," says amateur astronomer Mike Hood, who sends this July 28th picture from Kathleen, Georgia:


Image

The same result has been obtained by astrophotographer Raffaello Lena of Rome, Italy. "On July 27th, the Jupiter impact site has evolved and now contained two condensed nucleii," he says.


Repeat...seems to be developing two lobes...two condensed nuclei

Those images can be found here.

The Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts didn't evolve like that.

Jupiterspot?

I was thinking I just had a wacky idea, now I'm not so sure it's all that wacky after all. 8-)
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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby bboyer » Wed Jul 29, 2009 6:31 pm

'Least it isn't full of 1x4x9 black rectangles.... ;)
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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby solrey » Wed Jul 29, 2009 8:55 pm

Least it isn't full of 1x4x9 black rectangles....


LOL. As far as we know. :?
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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby Osmosis » Wed Jul 29, 2009 10:24 pm

solrey wrote:
Least it isn't full of 1x4x9 black rectangles....


LOL. As far as we know. :?


But are you sure? :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:
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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby StandingWave » Fri Jul 31, 2009 10:50 am

Seems theres a spot of bother on venus too...

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/090730-venus-bright-spot.html

A sudden bright spot that appeared in the clouds of Venus just days after a comet left a bruise on Jupiter has scientists stumped as to its cause


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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby FS3 » Tue Aug 04, 2009 10:48 am

Thank you! We have been notified of this (possibly connected) event and it is no coincidence that we discussed it in THIS thread...

StandingWave wrote:Seems theres a spot of bother on venus too...

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/090730-venus-bright-spot.html

A sudden bright spot that appeared in the clouds of Venus just days after a comet left a bruise on Jupiter has scientists stumped as to its cause


:o


See:
Solar System is breaking out in spots...


...and there was created an extra thread as well:

What's with Venus' "White Spot"?

Meanwhile I´ve been asking for some new development regarding this "Venus"-spot - but as monitoring needs a special UV-filter - new data is hard to get...

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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby solrey » Sat Aug 08, 2009 3:53 pm

OK. So now three distinct spots have developed after the original, single spot, morphed into two seperate lobes, which have recently morphed into three, or a "trifurcation". :?
I know Jupiter's winds are strong, and both chaotic and organized, likely driven by electromagnetic forces, but this spot thing just seems to maintain a certain organization, and even growth, that doesn't appear to be driven by winds alone, if at all.

Image

I'll double check the dates, but I'm pretty sure that the appearance of this spot, as well as each time it has grown a new "lobe", coincides with a dip in 10.7cm solar radio flux.

A few days after this alleged impact spot, apparently now known as Wesley's impact, it was announced that a veritable cornucopia of telescopes and instruments would be monitoring the event as it unfolds, but since then...narry a peep.
Is the data that boring, or is it something that just doesn't compute? ;)
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Re: Jupiter finally goes "electric"!

Unread postby DustyDevil » Sun Aug 09, 2009 1:01 pm

SpaceWeather.com has an animation of 3-week's worth of photos taken by amateur astronomers since Wesley announced his discovery. The animation can be found at the following link:

http://www.spaceweather.com/

Since the SpaceWeather.com front page changes daily, here is the write-up accompanying the animation:

EVOLUTION OF AN IMPACT: Since July 19th, when Anthony Wesley of Australia discovered the scattered remains of a mystery impactor in the high clouds of Jupiter, amateur astronomers around the world have been photographing the planet every night. "German astronomer Hans Joerg Mettig has converted some of the best images into polar projections," says Theo Ramakers, "and I have stitched them together to make a movie."
. . .

The 3-week animation, which begins with Wesley's discovery image and ends yesterday, shows the cindery cloud expanding, swirling, and ultimately being torn into three pieces by turbulent south polar winds. "The spot has really progressed dramatically," says Ramakers.

No one knows how the movie will end. Planetary scientists say the debris could evolve in interesting and unexpected ways before it finally disperses some weeks from now. Astronomers who wish to contribute scenes can monitor the cloud near Jupiter's System II longitude 210°. For predicted times when it will cross the planet's central meridian, add 2 hours to Sky and Telescope's predicted transit times for Jupiter's Great Red Spot.


And here's the direct link to the animation:

http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2009/0 ... o49t6cip92

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