Electric Jupiter

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Electric Jupiter

Unread postby comingfrom » Wed Feb 22, 2017 10:40 pm

Juno Jupiter Probe Won't Move into Shorter Orbit After All

NASA's Juno spacecraft won't move into a closer orbit around Jupiter as originally planned, agency officials announced today (Feb. 17).

Juno slipped into a highly elliptical, 53-Earth-day-long orbit around Jupiter when it arrived at the giant planet on July 4, 2016. The probe was supposed to perform an engine burn in October to reduce its orbital period to 14 days, but an issue with two helium valves postponed that maneuver.

The engine burn has now been canceled, meaning Juno will stay where it is through the end of its mission.


And further in the article, something of interest to EU theory.
Juno has conducted four close flybys since arriving at Jupiter — on Aug. 27, Oct. 19, and Dec. 11, 2016, and Feb. 2, 2017. These encounters have already revealed that Jupiter's magnetic field and auroras are more powerful than scientists had thought, and that the bands and belts visible at the planet's cloud tops actually extend deep into the interior.


And, NASA's Juno photo gallery;
Photos: NASA's Juno mission to Jupitor

Of the 47 images provided, only 11 are of Jupiter from Juno, 3 of these being long distant shots. The rest of the images are diagrams, artists' impressions, a photo of the NASA crew celebrating, and even a photo of some Lego® pieces they sent onboard Juno.

(wha!?)
No, don't worry about checking if all the valves work properly, but make sure you don't forget to get them Lego® toys onboard.
Aye, aye, sir.
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Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby querious » Thu May 25, 2017 8:30 pm

Ok, this is weird...

From NASA's Juno Spacecraft Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter
-The gas giant is getting really weird.

...Connerney and his colleagues thought Jupiter's light-show was due to a similar downward flow of electrons pouring into the Jovian atmosphere.

But Juno's instruments revealed a whole other story. The Jovian aurorae are powered by the electrons being sucked out of the planet's polar region, which basically means that Jupiter powers its light-show all on its own.

"It's a 180-degree reversal of what we were originally assuming," Connerney told ScienceAlert. "We never expected to see such strong auroral emissions caused by electrons being channelled out of the polar region."
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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby Lloyd » Tue May 30, 2017 7:09 am

I've been wanting to know since a few years ago how large are the solid parts of the gas giants. They seem to be saying now that the gravity measurements suggest that Jupiter doesn't have a very solid core, but that it's slushy or indistinct and from 7 to 25 Earth masses. That seems kind of small. If Jupiter lost all its gaseous atmosphere, the remaining core would probably be not over 24,000 miles in diameter. I guess that's not so small, about the size of the smaller gas giants. I wonder if the slushy core would consolidate into a rocky body.
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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby D_Archer » Wed May 31, 2017 8:15 am

querious wrote:Ok, this is weird...

From NASA's Juno Spacecraft Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter
-The gas giant is getting really weird.

...Connerney and his colleagues thought Jupiter's light-show was due to a similar downward flow of electrons pouring into the Jovian atmosphere.

But Juno's instruments revealed a whole other story. The Jovian aurorae are powered by the electrons being sucked out of the planet's polar region, which basically means that Jupiter powers its light-show all on its own.

"It's a 180-degree reversal of what we were originally assuming," Connerney told ScienceAlert. "We never expected to see such strong auroral emissions caused by electrons being channelled out of the polar region."


I think they are jumping the gun with this, electrons go both ways, there is a Birkeland current here, counter rotation and in and out flows of charged particles, the probe probably just went over a region where more electrons came out then in, they should be able to pick up variations...... :?

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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby D_Archer » Tue Jun 06, 2017 2:21 am

Lloyd wrote:I've been wanting to know since a few years ago how large are the solid parts of the gas giants. They seem to be saying now that the gravity measurements suggest that Jupiter doesn't have a very solid core, but that it's slushy or indistinct and from 7 to 25 Earth masses. That seems kind of small. If Jupiter lost all its gaseous atmosphere, the remaining core would probably be not over 24,000 miles in diameter. I guess that's not so small, about the size of the smaller gas giants. I wonder if the slushy core would consolidate into a rocky body.


Hi Lloyd,

The blue color at the poles is interesting*, i tried to find what EU can say about this, but did not find anything.

*https://www.sciencealert.com/images/2017-05/Juno2.jpg

I think because of the Birkeland current action, the material that are more on the inside of Jupiter can more easily be seen at the poles because they would uplift more... just an idea. Could the core consolidate into a rock body, yes, sure why not, it would take a long time i think.

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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby kodybatill » Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:42 pm

D_Archer wrote:
Lloyd wrote:I've been wanting to know since a few years ago how large are the solid parts of the gas giants. They seem to be saying now that the gravity measurements suggest that Jupiter doesn't have a very solid core, but that it's slushy or indistinct and from 7 to 25 Earth masses. That seems kind of small. If Jupiter lost all its gaseous atmosphere, the remaining core would probably be not over 24,000 miles in diameter. I guess that's not so small, about the size of the smaller gas giants. I wonder if the slushy core would consolidate into a rocky body.


Hi Lloyd,

The blue color at the poles is interesting*, i tried to find what EU can say about this, but did not find anything.

*https://www.sciencealert.com/images/2017-05/Juno2.jpg

I think because of the Birkeland current action, the material that are more on the inside of Jupiter can more easily be seen at the poles because they would uplift more... just an idea. Could the core consolidate into a rock body, yes, sure why not, it would take a long time i think.

Regards,
Daniel


I believe the white blue color to be Magnesium type elements and the black blue to be Calcium type elements. For these to be on the north and south poles - means that a lot of inert gases, seeming to mostly be the white-yellow of Niton/Neon type - are moving so close to Magnesium - that the positrons or colors around opposites being taken by the Niton type inert gases - are slowing down to have a noticeable wall between the calcium which is leaving behind all positrons or colors around opposites - and the rest of the yellow-white Niton type gases of taking positrons or colors around opposites of it's surface. The connection between positrons/colors around opposites, and protons, is magnetism.
Then the bands of white/orange would be fluorine type elements of moving heat when ever only some positrons are left behind - and the black orange would be chlorine type elements of slowing down orbits so that infra-red connections can be made for a longer amount of time.
This would mean that Jupiter's purpose is along the lines of - creating heat, from the slowing down of Niton, which pushes pressure on water, of a type that separates calcium from magnesium - and so also similar positrons separated from similar positrons.

I would say that Jupiter contains at it's center a lot of hydrogen at 90 degrees to either first generation silicon type elements, or first generation electron neutrinos. This design itself brings out the brightness of positrons or colors around opposites - which seems like would be guided by the similar blue positrons or colors around opposites of calcium and magnesium, by being split at any range of moments of 90 degrees being formed between their own positrons - hence leading to direct resonant communication between the surface and possible 90 degree electron neutrino-silicon/hydrogen center.
Jupiter creates interstellar magnesium type neutrons which as well as becoming brighter than most magnesium because of the silicon-hydrogen center - also pushes against Niton which creates the well known (to atomic physicists) - effect of a Universal pressure on all water - which now with brighter colors - create neutrons that across a very wide spectra - push against water, possibly more than a more massive star, if it was not created in the same way - mainly to say, Jupiter is pushing against water more than a larger star that is lower in Niton water pressure elements.

What does this means for EU?
Probably that when electric forces slow down, they merge with water.
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Re: Electric Jupiter

Unread postby AltClut » Wed Sep 06, 2017 12:06 pm

still unable to call it what it is, this feels like it could be progress though... potentially

https://phys.org/news/2017-09-jupiter-a ... stery.html
Scientists on NASA's Juno mission have observed massive amounts of energy swirling over Jupiter's polar regions that contribute to the giant planet's powerful aurora - only not in ways the researchers expected.

Examining data collected by the ultraviolet spectrograph and energetic-particle detector instruments aboard the Jupiter-orbiting Juno spacecraft, a team led by Barry Mauk of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, observed signatures of powerful electric potentials, aligned with Jupiter's magnetic field, that accelerate electrons toward the Jovian atmosphere at energies up to 400,000 electron volts. This is 10 to 30 times higher than the largest auroral potentials observed at Earth, where only several thousands of volts are typically needed to generate the most intense aurora—known as discrete aurora—the dazzling, twisting, snake-like northern and southern lights seen in places like Alaska and Canada, northern Europe, and many other northern and southern polar regions.

Image

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-jupiter-a ... stery.html
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Re: Electric Jupiter

Unread postby Robertus Maximus » Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:58 am

Jupiter's X-ray auroras pulse independently

Latest observations from XMM-Newton and Chandra:

https://phys.org/news/2017-10-jupiter-x-ray-auroras-pulse-independently.html

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/1017/301017-jupiter-xray-auroras

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-017-0262-6

Jupiter’s intense northern and southern lights pulse independently of each other according to new UCL-led research using ESA’s XMM-Newton and NASA’s Chandra X-ray observatories.

The study, published today in Nature Astronomy, found that very high-energy X-ray emissions at Jupiter’s south pole consistently pulse every 11 minutes. Meanwhile those at the north pole are erratic: increasing and decreasing in brightness, independent of the south pole.

This behaviour is distinct from Earth’s north and south auroras which broadly mirror each other in activity. Other similarly large planets, such as Saturn, do not produce any detectable X-ray aurora, which makes the findings at Jupiter particularly puzzling.

“We didn’t expect to see Jupiter’s X-ray hot spots pulsing independently as we thought their activity would be coordinated through the planet’s magnetic field. We need to study this further to develop ideas for how Jupiter produces its X-ray aurora and NASA’s Juno mission is really important for this,” explained lead author, William Dunn (UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory, UK and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, USA).

Since arriving at Jupiter in 2016, the Juno mission has been re-writing much of what is known about the giant planet, but the spacecraft does not have an X-ray instrument on board. To understand how the X-ray aurora are produced, the team hope to combine the X-ray aurora information gathered using XMM-Newton and Chandra with data collected by Juno as it explores the regions producing Jupiter’s aurora.

“If we can start to connect the X-ray signatures with the physical processes that produce them, then we can use those signatures to understand other bodies across the Universe such as brown dwarfs, exoplanets or maybe even neutron stars. It is a very powerful and important step towards understanding X-rays throughout the Universe and one that we only have while Juno is conducting measurements simultaneously with Chandra and XMM-Newton,” said William Dunn.

One of the theories that Juno may help to prove or disprove is that Jupiter’s auroras form separately when the planet’s magnetic field interacts with the solar wind. The team suspect that the magnetic field lines vibrate, producing waves that carry charged particles towards the poles and these change in speed and direction of travel until they collide with Jupiter’s atmosphere, generating X-ray pulses.

Using the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observatories in May to June 2016 and March 2007, the authors produced maps of Jupiter’s X-ray emissions and identified an X-ray hot spot at each pole. Each hot spot covers an area much bigger than the surface of the earth. Studying each to identify patterns of behaviour, they found that the hot spots have very different characteristics.

“The behaviour of Jupiter’s X-ray hot spots raises important questions about what processes produce these auroras. We know that a combination of solar wind ions and ions of Oxygen and Sulphur, originally from volcanic explosions from Jupiter’s moon, Io, are involved. However, their relative importance in producing the X-ray emissions is unclear,” explained co-author Dr Licia Ray (Lancaster University).

“What I find particularly captivating in these observations, especially at the time when Juno is making measurements in situ, is the fact that we are able to see both of Jupiter's poles at once, a rare opportunity that last occurred ten years ago. Comparing the behaviours at the two poles allows us to learn much more of the complex magnetic interactions going on in the planet's environment,” concluded co-author Professor Graziella Branduardi-Raymont (UCL Space & Climate Physics).

The team hopes to keep tracking the activity of Jupiter’s poles over the next two years using X-ray observing campaigns in conjunction with Juno to see if this previously unreported behaviour is commonplace.

The UCL and Harvard-Smithsonian-led study also involved researchers from Lancaster University, University of Southampton, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Universite de Liege, Boston University, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, MIT and Universidad Pontificia Comillas. It was kindly funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), ESA, the Natural and Environmental Research Council (NERC) and UCL.
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Re: Electric Jupiter

Unread postby seasmith » Mon Oct 30, 2017 4:30 pm

~
From the UCL - Nature Astronomy paper 30 Oct 2017:

Analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC spectra (Supplementary Information) shows that the dominant emissions from the north- ern and southern aurora are from precipitating ions of O7+,8+ and S6+,...,14+ and/or C5+,6+ and therefore relate to downward current regions9,10. To identify more precisely the sources for these precip- itating ions and the associated downward currents, we use a flux equivalence mapping model12,13 to connect magnetic field lines in the ionosphere with the equatorial magnetosphere (using the north- ern Grodent anomaly12 and southern VIP414 models).
..........

Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities (KHIs) are perhaps one of the most important large-scale instabilities that occur in coronal, mag- netospheric and astrophysical environments, transferring large quantities of energy, momentum and plasma between separate plasma regimes. They are also thought to occur at Jupiter’s mag- netopause21,24, and they offer an alternative mechanism capable of explaining the periodic X-ray signatures3,8.
For the Earth’s magne- tosphere, KHIs can trigger magnetopause fluctuations and excite compressional ultralow-frequency (ULF) magnetic field oscilla- tions and field line resonances, driving standing Alfvén waves in the ionosphere25,26.
At Jupiter, ULF waves have been observed with 10–20min periodicity27,28, the lower bound of which matches our 9–12min X-ray pulsations. The periodicity of ULF oscillations depends on the magnitude of the magnetospheric cavity, velocity shear and thickness of the interaction boundary. At Jupiter, the size of the magnetosphere varies bimodally between compressed and expanded states (respective standoff distances16 63-92RJ). This could explain the bimodal 9–12min and 40–45min X-ray aurora periodicity.
If the thickness of the magnetopause boundary, size of the magnetosphere and velocity shear were similar on 24 May and 1 June, then KHI-driven Alfvén waves could produce recurring periodicity.
Moreover, KHIs could generate different brightening in each pole by driving oppositely directed field-aligned currents in each hemisphere through Ampere’s law. Traditional KHI studies focus solely on the shear in the flow as the generation mechanism. However, magnetic field orientation, plasma characteristics and thickness of the magnetopause boundary all have critical roles to play in generating wave modes along the boundary. It is for these reasons that, contrary to expectations from planetary rotation, KHIs are often observed along the dusk flank of the magnetospheres of both Earth29 and Saturn30, as well as the dawn sector, where the velocity shear is largest. Indeed, at larger velocity shears, KHI may also be stabilized30.
The prevalence and locations of KHIs, alongside the possibility of KHI-generated acceleration of the order of the MeV amu-1 required for the observed X-ray signatures, remain to be fully explored at Jupiter. However, wave–particle inter- actions, KHI-driven reconnection and/or modulation of current systems and their associated potential drops are all possible accel- aeration mechanisms.
......
These findings also highlight possible multi-wavelength connections for Jupiter’s aurora. Ultraviolet polar auroral flares31 sometimes coincide with X-ray brightenings5 and, like the X-ray pulsations, quasi-periodically enhance on roughly a 10min tim- escale32. Bright infrared auroral hot spots are also co-located with the X-ray hot spots, which may suggest that the pulses of precipitation of high-energy ions, and their associated drivers, provide an important heating mechanism for Jupiter’s stratosphere down to the 10 mbar pressure level33.
The independent behaviour of Jupiter’s pair of soft X-ray hot spots during these observations raises fundamental questions about what processes at rapidly rotating magnetospheres produce these auroras. For Jupiter, the spectral signatures of the precipitating ions suggest that the spots locate Jupiter’s downward currents10 and may identify the northern and southern cusps9. However, the observed distinctive behaviour could be indicative of non-equatorial recon- nection, magnetopause-driven ULF waves, tail reconnection or local magnetic conditions at each polar region.
Over the coming 2years, X-ray observing campaigns in conjunction with NASA’s Juno mission will offer the opportunity to determine whether the independent behaviour that we report here is commonplace or is unique to the observations presented here. Critically, they will help to identify the magnetospheric conditions and auroral processes that are able to generate Jupiter’s highest-energy emissions and the seemingly independent behaviour of the northern and southern soft X-ray hot spots.

Jovian Magsphere KHI.jpg
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