Electric Saturn

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagonal Jet Stream

Unread postby The Great Dog » Mon Dec 14, 2009 10:10 am

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Re: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagonal Jet Stream

Unread postby The Great Dog » Mon Dec 14, 2009 10:30 am

Hurricane eye structure could be related to plasma instabilities. There were multiple vortices visible within the eye of hurricane Isabel that the Great Dog thinks resemble diocotron instabilities. A pentagonal formation is also clearly seen:

Animation of Hurricane Isabel

Spoke structures are also visible, perhaps revealing the radial e-field that was generated by the charged water molecules whirling around at 300 kilometers per hour:

Isabel's Radial Spokes

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Re: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagonal Jet Stream

Unread postby mharratsc » Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:16 pm

I couldn't agree with you more, TGD!

Here's the proof in the pudding:

Image


I think that displays it quite nicely, thank you! :)


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Re: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagonal Jet Stream

Unread postby mharratsc » Mon Dec 14, 2009 3:32 pm

By the way- in the second video TGD posted, I think the barred spiral structure was clearly discernable prior to eddies appearing around the outer ring of the central vortex/eye- eddies that appeared to be forming much like the vortices of a diocotron instability, though it never gets as clearly defined a a high voltage plasma experiment might display it.

Still, I say- as a layman - the electrical explanation of these videos far surpasses any explanations I've heard of from a thermodynamic perspective. I won't be dazzled by mathematical formula. Explain what you think I *should* see, tell me the physics behind why you think I should see it- THAT will convince me!

Therefore, I stand convinced that this vortice was displaying the very characteristics that the EU predicted should occur, just as they did for the south pole of Venus, and the gas giants. :)

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Re: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagonal Jet Stream

Unread postby The Great Dog » Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:06 pm

A resource from the pack at NOAA with GOES satellite images of major hurricanes and cyclones from 2000 to 2008:

NOAA Satellite and Information Service

Hurricane Rita and many others exhibit polygonal eyes and well-defined borders.

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Re: Saturn Currently Stormy.

Unread postby seasmith » Fri Dec 18, 2009 12:19 pm

Image
A Flash of Light from Titan

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has photographed a flash of sunlight reflecting from a lake on Saturn's moon Titan, confirming the presence of liquid hydrocarbons ....



http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/18dec_titanglint.htm?list1066595
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Re: 'Super Earth' discovered orbitting nearby small star

Unread postby redeye » Fri Dec 18, 2009 12:47 pm

Full image

This image shows the first flash of sunlight reflected off a lake on Saturn's moon Titan. The glint off a mirror-like surface is known as a specular reflection. This kind of glint was detected by the visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on NASA's Cassini spacecraft on July 8, 2009. It confirmed the presence of liquid in the moon's northern hemisphere, where lakes are more numerous and larger than those in the southern hemisphere. Scientists using VIMS had confirmed the presence of liquid in Ontario Lacus, the largest lake in the southern hemisphere, in 2008.

The northern hemisphere was shrouded in darkness for nearly 15 years, but the sun began to illuminate the area again as it approached its spring equinox in August 2009. VIMS was able to detect the glint as the viewing geometry changed. Titan's hazy atmosphere also scatters and absorbs many wavelengths of light, including most of the visible light spectrum. But the VIMS instrument enabled scientists to look for the glint in infrared wavelengths that were able to penetrate through the moon's atmosphere. This image was created using wavelengths of light in the 5 micron range.

By comparing the new image to radar and near-infrared light images acquired from 2006 to 2008, Cassini scientists were able to correlate the reflection to the southern shoreline of a Titan lake called Kraken Mare. The sprawling Kraken Mare covers about 400,000 square kilometers (150,000 square miles). The reflection appeared to come from a part of the lake around 71 degrees north latitude and 337 degrees west latitude.

It was taken on Cassini's 59th flyby of Titan on July 8, 2009, at a distance of about 200,000 kilometers (120,000 miles). The image resolution was about 100 kilometers (60 miles) per pixel. Image processing was done at the German Aerospace Center in Berlin and the University of Arizona in Tucson.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The visual and infrared mapping spectrometer team is based at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm. The visual and infrared mapping spectrometer team homepage is at http://wwwvims.lpl.arizona.edu.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/DLR



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Re: Saturn Currently Stormy.

Unread postby Osmosis » Sat Jan 02, 2010 11:53 pm

Watch your pocketbooks! The funding drive for a lander to float on the methane lakes of Titan is starting :shock: :shock: :shock: !
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Re: Saturn Currently Stormy.

Unread postby solrey » Sun Jan 03, 2010 8:40 am

Osmosis is on it.

Sailing the Seas of Titan

The first interplanetary nautical craft may be a boat to explore the methane seas of Titan. A proposed mission to Titan would explore some of its largest seas, including Ligeia Mare (pictured) or the Kraken Mare, both of which are in the northern hemisphere of the foggy moon of Saturn. The concept has been studied for over two years by scientific team led by Ellen Stofan of Proxemy Research, Inc. in Washington DC, and has recently been submitted to NASA.

The concept is under consideration by NASA to be one of the Discovery Class missions – low-cost, high-return missions, which include the MESSENGER and Kepler missions. If chosen, the Titan Mare Explorer (TiME), could launch as early as January of 2015, and would make port at Titan in June of 2023. The total proposed cost of TiME is currently estimated at $425 million. Stofan described the proposal at this year's American Geophysical Union meeting in San Fransisco, CA.


$425 million is low cost? Compared to what? The bankster bailout? The defense budget? The LCROSS mission was just $79 million. Then again, each shuttle launch costs about $450 million per mission.
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Re: Saturn Currently Stormy.

Unread postby The Great Dog » Sun Jan 03, 2010 9:55 am

The Great Dog will howl with laughter when he sees a stranded boat in the middle of Titan's desert.

Image

Titan's Glass Lakes

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Re: Saturn Currently Stormy.

Unread postby davesmith_au » Sun Jan 03, 2010 12:36 pm

"... *chk* ... we have splatdown ... oh dear ..."
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Re: Saturn Currently Stormy.

Unread postby mharratsc » Sun Jan 03, 2010 5:54 pm

"Now sit right down and you'll hear a tale... a tale of a fateful trip!
That started from this NASA port, aboard this robot ship!

(To the tune of a popular old sitcom)

... and when the 'splashdown' sequence has completed, and the first pictures are beamed back showing the lonely little craft tipped on it's side in a barren wasteland...

... a voice was heard crying out loudly...

"Gilligannnnnnnnnnnnnn!"

:lol:


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Re: Saturn Currently Stormy.

Unread postby Osmosis » Sun Jan 03, 2010 11:54 pm

I thought investing a few million in a compressed air mine in a former Iron Curtain country was a good bet, but a sailboat for traveling on Titan's Great Sand Sea is much better! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
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Explaining Plasma Motion Around Saturn

Unread postby flyingcloud » Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:16 am

not much in this article, but some are looking

Explaining Plasma Motion Around Saturn

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 184120.htm

ScienceDaily (Jan. 2, 2010) — Understanding the motion and source of the plasma around Saturn is important for understanding the dynamics of the magnetosphere. Pontius and Hill present a theory that describes plasma transport in Saturn's magnetosphere, including processes that add new mass to the plasma and those that remove momentum from the plasma without changing plasma mass.

Using observational data from the Cassini spacecraft on the angular velocity of plasma around Saturn along with chemistry models of Saturn's magnetosphere, the authors calculate the distribution of new mass entering the magnetosphere.

They confirm that most of the plasma comes from a neutral gas region near the orbit of Saturn's moon Enceladus and quantify the rate at which plasma mass is added to the magnetosphere from this region. The distribution and source of mass addition is important because it affects the rotation rate of the magnetosphere.

The work provides a new method of analysis that could be useful for future studies.

The research is published in Geophysical Research Letters. Authors include D. H. Pontius Jr.: Department of Physics, Birmingham-Southern College, Birmingham, Alabama, USA; and T. W. Hill: Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA.
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Re: Explaining Plasma Motion Around Saturn

Unread postby flyingcloud » Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:21 am

Saturn's Auroral Hiss Is Asymmetrical

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 183755.htm

ScienceDaily (Dec. 31, 2009) — Saturn emits "auroral hiss," a whistler-mode electromagnetic emission observed in the magnetosphere at high latitudes. This emission is similar to auroral hiss emitted by Earth. However, unlike Earth's auroral hiss, Gurnett et al. find that Saturn rotates in a beam-like matter around the planet.

Using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft, the authors observe that the auroral hiss emitted by Saturn has a different rotation rate in the northern and southern hemispheres; the period is about 10.6 hours in the northern hemisphere and about 10.8 hours in the southern hemisphere. They note that the rotation periods match the modulation periods of another type of radio emission, Saturn kilometric radiation, which was also recently found to rotate at different rates in the two hemispheres.

This new observation confirms a fundamental north-south asymmetry in the rotation rates of high-latitude plasma phenomena in the two hemispheres.

The authors suggest that the results also have implications for understanding how the planet's rotation is transferred to the magnetosphere plasma.

The research is published in Geophysical Research Letters. Authors include D. A. Gurnett, A. M. Persoon, J. B. Groene, A. J. Kopf, G. B. Hospodarsky, W. S. Kurth: Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.
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