Electric Saturn

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Saturn Currently Stormy.

Unread postby StefanR » Wed Nov 12, 2008 4:01 pm

Image
Saturn has its own unique brand of aurora that lights up the polar cap, unlike any other planetary aurora known in our solar system. This odd aurora revealed itself to one of the infrared instruments on NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
"It's not just a ring of auroras like those we've seen at Jupiter or Earth. This aurora covers an enormous area across the pole. Our current ideas on what forms Saturn's aurora predict that this region should be empty, so finding such a bright aurora here is a fantastic surprise."
"Saturn's unique auroral features are telling us there is something special and unforeseen about this planet's magnetosphere and the way it interacts with the solar wind and the planet's atmosphere," said Nick Achilleos, Cassini scientist on the Cassini magnetometer team at the University College London. "Trying to explain its origin will no doubt lead us to physics which uniquely operates in the environment of Saturn."
The new infrared aurora appears in a region hidden from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, which has provided views of Saturn's ultraviolet aurora. Cassini observed it when the spacecraft flew near Saturn's polar region. In infrared light, the aurora sometimes fills the region from around 82 degrees north all the way over the pole. This new aurora is also constantly changing, even disappearing within a 45 minute-period.

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/press-release-details.cfm?newsID=881

Surprise,surprise....imagine that. :roll:
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.
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Re: Saturn Currently Stormy.

Unread postby StefanR » Wed Nov 12, 2008 4:04 pm

Theta Aurora

This aurora also passes over the pole. Maybe a certain resemblance?
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.
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Re: Mysterious Light Show at Saturn

Unread postby Drethon » Thu Nov 13, 2008 7:57 am

I like how the lights seems to follow the hexagon fairly closely...
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Re: Mysterious Light Show at Saturn

Unread postby substance » Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:05 am

Interesting picture. Looks like computer graphics a bit, especially the aurora.
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Re: Mysterious Light Show at Saturn

Unread postby flyingcloud » Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:45 am

Drethon wrote:I like how the lights seems to follow the hexagon fairly closely...


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 142129.htm

The hexagon structure may be required to sustain an artificial magnetospheer or potentially heliosphere to protect against cosmic radiation during pole shifts and other "power outages"

I envision things like jacob's ladders on turntables.
a pair of waves connected like our dna with the rungs as the electric climbs along the 3-d spiral wave, (take the cell structure and these dna strands could represent string properties)
common duality, binary system
multiply this by 3 to get your trinity and basic balance x2 inverted gets your hexagon, water holds some influence here, cast out the nine thanks JL.
now spin the whole thing, like position it over a pole of a revolving planet
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Re: Mysterious Light Show at Saturn

Unread postby junglelord » Thu Nov 13, 2008 9:55 am

Sacred Geometry in your face. Illuminated by the Neon Plasma of the EU.
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Saturn Dazzles With Mysterious Light

Unread postby Discipline » Thu Nov 13, 2008 12:07 pm

http://news.aol.com/article/mysterious-light-show-seen-on-saturn/247048?icid=100214839x1212902798x1200863702

Nov. 12) -- An inexplicable new broad region of auroral light has been photographed at Saturn's polar cap.

Image

'A Fantastic Surprise'NASA / AP3 photos This image from the Cassini spacecraft shows a broad region of light on Saturn's polar cap. The aurora stunned scientists because it showed up in a region they thought was empty. "Finding such a bright one here is a fantastic surprise," said Tom Stallard, a British researcher.(Note: Please disable your pop-up blocker)

"We've never seen an aurora like this elsewhere," said Tom Stallard, an RCUK Academic Fellow working with Cassini data at the University of Leicester. "It's not just a ring of aurorae like those we've seen at Jupiter or Earth. This one covers an enormous area across the pole. Our current ideas on what forms Saturn's aurorae predict that this region should be empty, so finding such a bright one here is a fantastic surprise."

These colorful atmospheric light shows are caused when charged particles stream along the magnetic field of a planet and into its atmosphere. On Earth the charged particles come from the solar wind – a stream of particles that emanates from the sun. Skywatchers at high latitudes know the resulting displays as the Northern Lights.

Jupiter's main auroral ring, caused by interactions internal to Jupiter's magnetic environment, is constant in size. Saturn's main aurora, which is caused by the solar wind, changes size dramatically as the wind varies.

The newly observed aurora at Saturn, however, doesn't fit into either category.

"Saturn's unique auroral features are telling us there is something special and unforeseen about this planet's magnetosphere and the way it interacts with the solar wind and the planet's atmosphere," said Nick Achilleos, a scientist on the Cassini magnetometer team at the University College London. "Trying to explain its origin will no doubt lead us to physics which uniquely operates in the environment of Saturn."

The new image, in infrared, was imaged by the Cassini spacecraft. It is reported in the Nov. 13 issue of the journal Nature.
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Re: Mysterious Light Show at Saturn

Unread postby tholden » Fri Nov 14, 2008 9:09 am

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Re: Mysterious Light Show at Saturn

Unread postby moses » Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:52 pm

Imagine these currents increased. A circle of big electric current could melt a
circular section of the surface of Saturn, and thus promote the formation of
a new planet inside this ring. Even is Saturn is not hollow, a cylindrical piece
of crust could break away and being pretty hot, reshape into a sphere and thus
form a new planet. On the other hand the aurora ring could be evidence of a
section of the surface having already broken away. It is also evidence of a
large current travelling through the centre of the planet.
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'A stunning light display over Saturn has stumped scientists

Unread postby whitenightf3 » Sun Nov 16, 2008 2:05 am

Mysterious Glowing Aurora Confounds Scientists

article-1085354-02742975000005dc-662_468x387

'A stunning light display over Saturn has stumped scientists who say it behaves unlike any other planetary aurora known in our solar system. The blueish-green glow was found over the ringed planet's north polar region just like Earth's northern lights. It was discovered by the infrared instruments on NASA's Cassini spacecraft.'

Read more...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... tists.html
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Re: 'A stunning light display over Saturn has stumped scientists

Unread postby bboyer » Thu Nov 27, 2008 10:55 am

There is something beyond our mind which abides in silence within our mind. It is the supreme mystery beyond thought. Let one's mind and one's subtle body rest upon that and not rest on anything else. — Maitri Upanishad
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Saturn's Plasma Torus

Unread postby mnemeth1 » Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:04 pm

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap090111.html

Wow.

This is not a painting, it is an exagerated color image taken by the Cassini spacecraft.

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/ ... assini.jpg

(Official) Explanation: In the shadow of Saturn, unexpected wonders appear. The robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn recently drifted in giant planet's shadow for about 12 hours and looked back toward the eclipsed Sun. Cassini saw a view unlike any other. First, the night side of Saturn is seen to be partly lit by light reflected from its own majestic ring system. Next, the rings themselves appear dark when silhouetted against Saturn, but quite bright when viewed away from Saturn and slightly scattering sunlight, in the above exaggerated color image. Saturn's rings light up so much that new rings were discovered, although they are hard to see in the above image. Visible in spectacular detail, however, is Saturn's E ring, the ring created by the newly discovered ice-fountains of the moon Enceladus, and the outermost ring visible above. Far in the distance, visible on the image left just above the bright main rings, is the almost ignorable pale blue dot of Earth.
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Is Storm Alley on Saturn a diocotron instability?

Unread postby mharratsc » Wed Feb 04, 2009 11:26 am

This may have been covered in a past topic and if so- I apologize.

I just happened to be reading through the TPOD Archive and they had a fairly clear photo of the storm belt in Saturn's southern hemisphere, and it occured to me that it looked vaguely like a diocotron instability belted around the planet.

Knowing that the north pole of Saturn had that odd hexagon, and seeing those permanent swirls around the bottom of the opposite hemisphere it got me to wondering what the connection was.

Does anyone know for sure? I'm not very learned in this stuff, but I'm trying! :)

Mike H.
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Re: Is Storm Alley on Saturn a diocotron instability?

Unread postby Steve Smith » Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:13 pm

Those are probably not diocotron instabilities in Saturn's atmosphere. A plasma instability is created by two sheets of charge slipping past each other. Energy is dissipated in the form of two surface waves propagating in opposite directions, with one flowing over the other. However, one thing to keep in mind is that the clouds on Saturn are being blown around the planet by an 1800 kilometer per hour wind.

Wind creates fluid dynamic instabilities of its own and it's important not to confuse the two. Diocotron instabilities are inherently short-lived because plasma discharges are short-lived.

For instance, a Von Karman Vortex Street instability looks a lot like what's happening on Saturn.

Another fluid dynamic phenomenon is the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilty

Saturn also exhibits Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in its cloud formations.
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Re: Is Storm Alley on Saturn a diocotron instability?

Unread postby mharratsc » Fri Feb 06, 2009 1:17 pm

I see. I just thought it was odd that this line of whorls in the atmosphere only seemed to occur in that one particular belt, and it was on the opposite side from the polar hexagon- thought it might be related to current somehow. I know that the atmosphere shows distinct banding, and they say that the matter in the bands do not all move at the same rate (or even appear to move opposite one another) and I thought perhaps that might be akin to the two charges moving against each other.

Thanks for the reply, Steve :)

Mike H.
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