Electric Moon

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Moon dust

Unread postby allynh » Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:59 am

I love the Register. "Kamikaze" HA!

Kamikaze Moon mission on track as NASA grips its tumbling LADEE
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/09/09 ... _proceeds/
Video NASA has confirmed that its LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) probe is back on track for lunar orbit after being temporarily left tumbling by a power surge which occurred shortly after its launch.

LADEE took off atop a US Air Force Minotaur V rocket on 11:27pm EDT on Friday from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia, and the probe was successfully transferred into a low orbit. LADEE will make a series of increasingly wide orbits around Earth before being kicked into a lunar orbit with an expected arrival date on next month.

The probe, which will analyze the lunar atmosphere and test out a new super-fast laser broadband communications system, was undergoing NASA's first stage of diagnostics routines when the wheels used for stabilization and control shut down unexpectedly. Without these, the probe would be useless.

Checking showed a power surge had caused LADEE's computer to shut down the wheels to avoid them over-revving. Engineers have now disabled the fail-safe system to regain control, and they will be "selectively re-enabled."

"The LADEE spacecraft is healthy and communicating with mission operators," said Pete Worden, NASA Ames center director, in a canned statement.

The reliability of LADEE is key to NASA's future probe missions, since it's the first to use a new modular construction system the agency is trying out. Rather than building each probe as a custom job, LADEE is made up of pre-prepared packages of payload, propulsion, and support systems, which are fitted together to suit the job.
nasa_modular_probe.jpg

NASA's new modular design system

It's a technique Elon Musk's SpaceX has had success with, and NASA is hoping the design style will cut costs and increase the reliability of components. As such, failure would be problematic for many planned probe designs, not to mention the loss of LADEE's payload had the stabilization wheels remained powered down.

With LADEE back on track, the probe is now expected to reach lunar orbit on October 6 and begin its 100-day kamikaze mission around – and ultimately into – the Moon. LADEE's main mission is to examine the lunar atmosphere and try and solve a riddle posed by the astronauts who landed nearly 50 years ago.

Earth's first explorers reported noting a glow on the Moon's horizon that looked like a layer of lunar dust. The pitiful atmosphere around the Moon shouldn't be able to support dust particles, so LADEE will scan the atmosphere with light and mass spectrometers and sample the atmosphere in an attempt to capture any floating dust particles.
lunar_dust.jpg

Sketches of lunar dust clouds made by the Apollo 17 lander crew

LADEE's secondary mission is to test out NASA's version of broadband for space – a laser communication system capable of beaming over 600MBps back to controllers on Earth. NASA is still relying primarily on radio for space communications, but LADEE's Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration (LLCD) should provide an upgrade better than going from dial-up to broadband.

The LLCD uses a 0.5-watt infrared laser mounted on the side of LADEE to fire back information to a network of three receiving stations in California, New Mexico, and Spain. These are clusters of eight telescopes on a gimbal that can track the signals from space and fire back data.
llcd.jpg

Cat videos in spaaace

The pulse modem in the laser on the LLCD can push out 622Mbps download speeds, allowing real-time and HD definition video to be swiftly sent back. In its briefing sheet, NASA estimates the new system will cut the time it would take to download an HD movie from orbit from 639 hours using radio to eight minutes; an odd example to choose, unless the agency is putting together a pitch from Kim Dotcom.

After arriving at the Moon, LADEE will go through an additional 30 days of diagnostics and system power-up time before beginning its 100-day sampling mission, dipping between 20 and 60 kilometers above the Moon's surface as it tries to find out what gasses and matter can be detected.

When the sampling and scanning mission is completed, NASA will power down LADEE's systems and crash the probe into the lunar surface. The agency likes a tidy orbit and – as with the twin probes of its GRAIL mission – has decided a lunar mountain is going to get an interesting new crater once LADEE's job is done.
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Re: Moon dust

Unread postby Spektralscavenger » Thu Sep 12, 2013 9:24 am

"Evidence for a high altitude distribution of lunar dust"? A distribution map would help a lot. And the chemical composition analysis. Yes, I think electrostatic dust is the answer or part of the answer.
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Re: Moon dust

Unread postby D_Archer » Fri Sep 13, 2013 2:49 am

tharkun wrote:Consider this...

http://milesmathis.com/moonion.pdf


Indeed, quote from Mathis: "What we are seeing is not UV ionization of dust. We are seeing ions pushed up from the surface by a rising charge field"

It is a glow of ions not dust and the moon has an ionosphere.

Kind regards,
Daniel
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Re: Moon dust

Unread postby viscount aero » Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:51 pm

D_Archer wrote:
tharkun wrote:Consider this...

http://milesmathis.com/moonion.pdf


Indeed, quote from Mathis: "What we are seeing is not UV ionization of dust. We are seeing ions pushed up from the surface by a rising charge field"

It is a glow of ions not dust and the moon has an ionosphere.

Kind regards,
Daniel


Then it was perhaps an aurora.
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Re: Moon dust

Unread postby D_Archer » Tue Sep 17, 2013 12:59 am

viscount aero wrote:
D_Archer wrote:
tharkun wrote:Consider this...

http://milesmathis.com/moonion.pdf


Indeed, quote from Mathis: "What we are seeing is not UV ionization of dust. We are seeing ions pushed up from the surface by a rising charge field"

It is a glow of ions not dust and the moon has an ionosphere.

Kind regards,
Daniel


Then it was perhaps an aurora.


Yes, maybe.

Regards,
Daniel
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Re: Water on Moon's Surface that Hints at Water Below

Unread postby quantauniverse » Wed Sep 25, 2013 5:00 pm

We were all wrongly taught to believe that water cannot exist on the moon, because there was no atmosphere, and it's too cold. ice without an atmosphere they said would sublime into outer space. NO WATER ON THE MOON WAS A PROVEN SCIENTIFIC FACT TO EVERY ASTRONOMER, when I went to school. Now it's believed a fact by most not all taught astronomers that gravity from theoretical dark matter shapes galaxies. :lol:
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Re: Water on Moon's Surface that Hints at Water Below

Unread postby viscount aero » Fri Sep 27, 2013 12:18 am

from the article:

"Compared to its surroundings, we found that the central portion of this crater contains a significant amount of hydroxyl - a molecule consisting of one oxygen atom and one hydrogen atom -- which is evidence that the rocks in this crater contain water that originated beneath the lunar surface," Klima said.

The water probably didn't originate beneath the surface.

This is probably the same process seen at comets, ie, the creation of hydroxyl and even water in the electrochemical reactions with the Sun described here (skip to 54:00 and begin watching to cut to the hydroxyl model):

The Electric Comet | Full Documentary
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34wtt2EUToo
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Re: Electric Moon

Unread postby jtb » Wed Oct 30, 2013 5:54 am

The electromagnetic theory of light postulates that light is absorbed by any object it comes in contact with. Frequencies resonate with the object are converted to heat energy. Non-resonate frequencies are re-emitted (not reflected).

It may be possible that the moon's resonate frequency is somehow altered and results in bursts of energy frequencies re-emitted from its surface or dust in its limited atmosphere.

Forms of energy other than light coming in contact with the moon may work the same way.
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Electric Sparks May Alter Evolution of Lunar Soil

Unread postby CosmicLettuce » Sat Aug 23, 2014 12:34 pm

"Nothing is rich but the inexhaustible wealth of nature. She shows us only surfaces, but she is a million fathoms deep" - Emerson

http://astroandmusic.blogspot.com/
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Re: Electric Sparks May Alter Evolution of Lunar Soil

Unread postby Metryq » Sat Aug 23, 2014 1:15 pm

which hold clues to our solar system's past


Catastrophism is still unthinkable. The Solar system must be immensely old—with no disconnects in its history to confound the past—and dark craters, comets and the like are clues to the Solar system's origins.

Oh, and some mainstream astrophysicist will be remembered for something a maverick scientist suggested a decade or more earlier (such as the "Fermi process/acceleration").
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Sparking Discovered in Lunar Soil

Unread postby Rossim » Tue Aug 26, 2014 3:21 pm

http://phys.org/news/2014-08-electric-e ... -soil.html

"Says Jordan, "Sparking is a process in which electrons, released from the soil grains by strong electric fields, race through the material so quickly that they vaporize little channels." Repeated sparking with each large solar storm could gradually grow these channels large enough to fragment the grains, disintegrating the soil into smaller particles of distinct minerals, Jordan and colleagues hypothesize."

The same author also wrote an article discussing the discovery of molecular hydrogen caused by charged particles dissociating the water ice: http://www.unh.edu/news/releases/2013/j ... nwater.cfm

Of course both articles are still confined by the current dogma so electric fields are caused by "eons" of charged particle bombardment. But now that more tools will be developed to look for electrical phenomena on planetary surfaces I'm confident that the EU perspectives will gain a bit more credence.

Can anyone post links to the actual journal articles? I couldn't seem to find them
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Re: Sparking Discovered in Lunar Soil

Unread postby viscount aero » Tue Aug 26, 2014 5:54 pm

This is a rather big find.
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Mascons on the Moon

Unread postby BronzeDragon » Sat Sep 20, 2014 9:28 pm

I just learned about these weird gravitational anomalies called mascons, which are areas of denser gravity just beneath some of the mares (or "seas").

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2006/06nov_loworbit/

Although scientists generally agree they resulted from ancient impacts billions of years ago, it’s unclear how much of the excess mass is due to denser lava material filling the crater or how much is due to upwelling of denser iron-rich mantle material to the crust. Regardless of composition or origin, the mascons make the Moon the most gravitationally "lumpy" body known in the solar system.


I'm sure none of it has anything to do with the moon's violent electrical past, so we can all get that idea out of our silly heads. Image
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Re: Mascons on the Moon

Unread postby Metryq » Sun Sep 21, 2014 6:55 am

Aren't mascons when sci-fi fans get together and dress up in costumes?

While the Moon may be the most gravitationally lumpy body in the Solar system, does that mean there are any others in its general class, or is the Moon radically different from anything else in the Solar system? If the latter, why? Does it tie in with "purple dawn" hypotheses?
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Re: Mascons on the Moon

Unread postby nick c » Tue Sep 23, 2014 4:45 pm

Yes, mascons (mass concentrations) are associated with lunar maria. It seems that from measurements made from orbiting spacecraft the Moon appears to be lumpy with respect to its' gravitational pull.
As far as I know, there has been no comment on this anomaly in any EU literature.
Very interesting.
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