Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: NASA Data Reveals Mega-Canyon under Greenland Ice Sheet

Unread postby neilwilkes » Wed Oct 15, 2014 6:59 am

Aristarchus wrote:I thought this would be interesting as it pertains to cataclysms from the past:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/icebr ... m7cMHCmj0c

NASA Data Reveals Mega-Canyon under Greenland Ice Sheet

Data from a NASA airborne science mission reveals evidence of a large and previously unknown canyon hidden under a mile of Greenland ice.

The canyon has the characteristics of a winding river channel and is at least 460 miles (750 kilometers) long, making it longer than the Grand Canyon. In some places, it is as deep as 2,600 feet (800 meters), on scale with segments of the Grand Canyon. This immense feature is thought to predate the ice sheet that has covered Greenland for the last few million years.


What a shame the multimedia section of that site only shows images of the aircraft - nothing at all on what was observed.....
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Re: Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Unread postby neilwilkes » Mon Oct 27, 2014 4:18 am

Thanks Steve - I will watch these on the Big Screen later via YouTube link on my Oppo player.
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Lake Mistassini

Unread postby Nicholas Wilmshurst » Tue Nov 25, 2014 10:10 am

I want to bring attention to Lake Mistassini in Quebec, Canada. It is a couple of hundred kilometers west of the Manicouagan crater. I wonder if the two could be associated with a single event? There are no obvious signs of Lichtenberg structures (maybe a hint in Baie Penicouane to the south west) but some suspicious aspects are as follows.
The lake has a distinctly different curve then just following the grain of the surrounding dike intrusions.
The curve can be extrapolated to point directly to the Manicouagan crater.
As discovered by Charles O'Dale and mentioned here: http://ottawa-rasc.ca/wiki/index.php?ti ... IleRouleau
shatter cones and planar deformation features in quartz have been found in the lake. These have previously been considered evidence for a local impact creator but I don't see one. They can also be considered evidence for a huge electrical discharge
I think more research is needed. Does anyone here have any more insight on this feature?
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Re: Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Unread postby GaryN » Tue Nov 25, 2014 11:30 pm

Hi Nicholas, welcome to the forums!
They can also be considered evidence for a huge electrical discharge

Yes, I'd say the two features could be associated with the same event, and likely others too.
I think more research is needed.

The research would only be done by EU proponents, the standard geological models are 'set in stone', so to speak. The dike intrusions themselves would seem to me to be to be of electrical origin too, as looking at some of the formations I have great difficulty imagining the standard explanation in progress. They are more likely due to re-crystalisation of the existing material by some configuration of EM forces created in the ground, the large discharge being the driving force. And Lichtenberg structures may not always be present as there is a great diversity of effects possible due to the nature of the driving event, and distances from the event.
I was wondering if you might have formal training in geology or petrology, sure would be nice to have someone from the establishment take an open minded look at the evidence.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Unread postby Nicholas Wilmshurst » Sat Nov 29, 2014 2:17 pm

Hi Garry,
No, I don't have formal training in geology or petrology but I work with several geologists daily. I have gradually tried to introduce them to some of the Thunderbolts interpretations. Sometimes I am ignored but sometimes I can't be ignored. I like the Lake Mistassini example because there is no established explanation for its formation. I have introduced this example to some of my coworkers (and will to others) who haven't come up with a better explanation for me or themselves. I am an electronics engineering technician with a geophysical exploration company so I wish the lake was more easily accessible and there was a financial incentive to explore it. I would love to map the local geology and have a geologist consider the electrical interpretation in a published paper. Maybe I can convince someone to wright a paper about the research that has already been done there, with the electrical interpretation.
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Re: Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Unread postby seasmith » Sat Nov 29, 2014 6:47 pm

Nicholas Wilmshurst wrote:
Hi Garry,
No, I don't have formal training in geology or petrology but I work with several geologists daily. I have gradually tried to introduce them to some of the Thunderbolts interpretations. Sometimes I am ignored but sometimes I can't be ignored. I like the Lake Mistassini example because there is no established explanation for its formation. I have introduced this example to some of my coworkers (and will to others) who haven't come up with a better explanation for me or themselves. I am an electronics engineering technician with a geophysical exploration company so I wish the lake was more easily accessible and there was a financial incentive to explore it. I would love to map the local geology and have a geologist consider the electrical interpretation in a published paper. Maybe I can convince someone to wright a paper about the research that has already been done there, with the electrical interpretation.


Nicholas, This site may be a good probe, with which to approach your compatriot 'exploration geologists':
(may we assume the engineering 'geophysical' field to be hydro-carbon-geology explorations?)

Basic Concepts

Electromagneticl geophysical methods are used to map the subsurface resistivity structure. The resistivity of geologic units ranges over many orders of magnitude and depends on their fluid content, porosity, degree of fracturing, temperature, and conductive mineral content. Unlike other geophysical methods (like gravity and magnetism), EM methods include a wide variety of techniques. Each technique, however, involves an EM source (natural or artificial) and measures one or more electric or magnetic field component.


http://geomaps.wr.usgs.gov/electrical/i ... l/index.ht


(a long, but worthwhile read)
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=2150&start=45


also:
viewtopic.php?p=36371
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Chattanooga, TN, USA

Unread postby bdw000 » Sun Dec 07, 2014 2:49 pm

I think you will find some dramatic electrical characteristics just east of Chattanooga, Tennessee (USA).

Here is a link to Google Earth:

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.979777,-85.5541242,106055m/data=!3m1!1e3?hl=en

There is a long, smooth valley east of Chattanooga that is very interesting, but it is MUCH more dramatic when viewed in "classic" google maps (choose the question mark in the bottom right of the screen of regular google maps) where you can choose the "terrain" from the upper right corner menu.I wish I could create a link from plain old google maps, but I can't seem to do it.

The electrical scars (imho) go southeast all the way to Huntsville, Alabama, and also northeast of Chattanooga.
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Re: Chattanooga, TN, USA

Unread postby Cubit32 » Tue Dec 09, 2014 6:58 am

The features are very dendritic looking. Perhaps we can better see the features with an elevation map like we have of mars, but to scales that are relevant to this topography?
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Re: Chattanooga, TN, USA

Unread postby starbiter » Tue Dec 09, 2014 7:30 am

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.0483862 ... !1e4?hl=en With New Google Maps You need to go to Map in the lower left to then get terrain.


http://goo.gl/maps/LqBSj If You go to classic Google Maps there is a link [chain symbol].

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bdw000 wrote:I think you will find some dramatic electrical characteristics just east of Chattanooga, Tennessee (USA).

Here is a link to Google Earth:

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.979777,-85.5541242,106055m/data=!3m1!1e3?hl=en

There is a long, smooth valley east of Chattanooga that is very interesting, but it is MUCH more dramatic when viewed in "classic" google maps (choose the question mark in the bottom right of the screen of regular google maps) where you can choose the "terrain" from the upper right corner menu.I wish I could create a link from plain old google maps, but I can't seem to do it.

The electrical scars (imho) go southeast all the way to Huntsville, Alabama, and also northeast of Chattanooga.
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Re: Chattanooga, TN, USA

Unread postby starbiter » Tue Dec 09, 2014 7:41 am

Hi BDW,

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.0921369 ... a=!5m1!1e4

The above link shows the Tennessee River flowing through a formation with cliffs [leeward] to the right and windward to the left. In my vision the river was there when the formation grew around the river. The wind was from the West.

The river prevented the small canyon. It wasn't eroded, IMHO.

michael




bdw000 wrote:I think you will find some dramatic electrical characteristics just east of Chattanooga, Tennessee (USA).

Here is a link to Google Earth:

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.979777,-85.5541242,106055m/data=!3m1!1e3?hl=en

There is a long, smooth valley east of Chattanooga that is very interesting, but it is MUCH more dramatic when viewed in "classic" google maps (choose the question mark in the bottom right of the screen of regular google maps) where you can choose the "terrain" from the upper right corner menu.I wish I could create a link from plain old google maps, but I can't seem to do it.

The electrical scars (imho) go southeast all the way to Huntsville, Alabama, and also northeast of Chattanooga.
I Ching #49 The Image
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And makes the seasons clear

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Re: Chattanooga, TN, USA

Unread postby bdw000 » Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:26 am

starbiter wrote:Hi BDW,

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.0921369 ... a=!5m1!1e4

The above link shows the Tennessee River flowing through a formation with cliffs [leeward] to the right and windward to the left. In my vision the river was there when the formation grew around the river. The wind was from the West.

The river prevented the small canyon. It wasn't eroded, IMHO.

michael


Hey thanks Starbiter for putting that link to classic google maps with the "terrain" function.

And I can't believe I said there were more electrical scars north EAST of Chattanooga: I meant to say northWEST.
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Re: Chattanooga, TN, USA

Unread postby The Great Dog » Wed Dec 10, 2014 9:05 am

There is a Picture of the Day that discusses that region, in passing:

http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2008/ ... icpast.htm

If I remember from so long ago, I think there's a nice 3D anaglyph of the area included in one of the links.

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Re: Chattanooga, TN, USA

Unread postby bdw000 » Fri Dec 12, 2014 6:52 pm

Hey Great dog, I don't see any reference to Tennessee in that TPOD (maybe I'm blind). There is a reference to Massanutten mountain, but that is a few hundred miles to the northeast of Chattanooga, TN.
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Taylor, BC, Canada

Unread postby bdw000 » Fri Dec 19, 2014 8:53 am

I think this is a nice "mini" grand canyon:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Taylor,+BC,+Canada&ll=56.105364,-120.687561&spn=0.305186,0.891953&cid=13892125644385353519&hnear=Taylor,+Peace+River,+British+Columbia,+Canada&t=p&z=11&iwloc=A

Unfortunately, in order to see anything, you need to click on the question mark in the bottom right corner and choose "classic" google maps. Then, in the upper right corner, you can then choose "terrain," where the electrical scars really show up well.

I used the "link" function while in classic google maps, but when you click on the link it sends you to the new google maps which does not have the "terrain" function (that I know of).

Be sure to zoom in and out and follow the river east and west.
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