Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Caldera Landform Characteristics & Electricity

Unread postby Sparky » Tue Jul 05, 2011 3:30 pm

There are those here that hold that Australia had extensive electrical activity. From what you said, it sounds like you are giving examples of such. Maybe post some images for discussion.
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Re: Caldera Landform Characteristics & Electricity

Unread postby Tweed365 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 6:13 pm

This is the lovely Tweed Valley, inland between Surfers Paradise QLD and Byron Bay NSW. In fact the northern wall of the Tweed Valley constitutes part of the NSW/QLD border.: http://maps.google.com.au/maps?q=mount+warning&ll=-28.419183,153.271637&spn=0.785062,1.058807&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&gl=au&t=k&z=10

As you can see, Mount Warning's peak is closely surrounded by what looks like some layered chiselling. However, there is actually a peak, in contrast to to the hollow peaks found in most of the photos of arc-craters on TPOD.... giving rise to doubt#1. Can electrical arcing leave a peak?

The 'crater' circle isnt complete - there's a gap to the SW and a larger one to the NE - E - SE. - Doubt #2 Could an electrical arc (of appropriate dimensions) leave such an incomplete circle?

To the NNW there is an inwards incursion of the 'crater' wall into the valley (Limpinwood Nature Reserve) .... - Doubt #3 Is that consistent with an arc event?

The valley walls on the W-NW side are very steep to sheer behind Tyalgum & Limpinwood (pictures to follow, beautiful).

The Tweed River flows NE and into the sea at Tweed Heads/QLD, through a flat plain punctuated by several rather large round boulders that look stuck in it (photos to follow). This plain could not logically have been the product of erosion imho.

These are the questions I have for the members of this forum.

I studied social geography, not geology, but if the forum members indicate on the facts presented above that there is a good chance the Tweed was borne out of electro/geographical phenomena than I will start looking further.


***
BTW it may interest you to know that the Tweed Valley might be the world's largest totemic site, being Wulambiny Momoli (Turkey Nest) for the Ngarakwal/Githibul people - Mount Warning looks like a digging bush turkey from some angles of vision.-http://www.mountwarningwebcam.com
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Re: Caldera Landform Characteristics & Electricity

Unread postby Sparky » Wed Jul 06, 2011 8:21 am

several rather large round boulders


this would be an indication of electrical formations...

I looked up some images and explanations of geological formations, but could not see much...too many trees..

there may have been volcanic activity, along with water and other weathering. all of these will interact, so it may be difficult to say for sure what caused what.

i have been told that a discharge can leave a peak.

Could an electrical arc (of appropriate dimensions) leave such an incomplete circle?--an inwards incursion of the 'crater' wall into the valley.


there may have been multiple strikes and various types of electrical activity, maybe at different periods of time, all producing unique formations.

it is all speculation, but some speculation is from a more informed position than others. all i can say with some assurance is that there were no black holes involved... :D
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Underground river 'Rio Hamza' 4km beneath the Amazon

Unread postby Aristarchus » Fri Aug 26, 2011 11:29 am

It would be interesting to have an Electric Universe explanation for this, relating it to the carving of the mountains by gigantic lightening scarring, given that these scientists believe that the underground river begins in the Acre region of the Andes:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2 ... ver-amazon

The underground river starts in the Acre region under the Andes and flows through the Solimões, Amazonas and Marajó basins before opening out directly into the depths of the Atlantic Ocean.


The Amazon flows much faster than the Hamza, however, draining a greater volume of water. Around 133,000m3 of water flow through the Amazon per second at speeds of up to 5 metres per second. The underground river's flow rate has been estimated at around 3,900m3 per second and it barely inches along at less than a millimetre per hour.


The Hamza was located using data collected inside a series of 241 abandoned deep wells that were drilled in the Amazon region by the petrochemical company Petrobras in the 1970s and 1980s. Elizabeth Tavares Pimentel and Valiya Hamza of the Department of Geophysics at Brazil's National Observatory led the work and presented their results last week at the International Congress of the Society Brasiliera Geophysical in Rio de Janeiro.
An object is cut off from its name, habits, associations. Detached, it becomes only the thing, in and of itself. When this disintegration into pure existence is at last achieved, the object is free to become endlessly anything. ~ Jim Morrison
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Big Drips

Unread postby Sparky » Sat Sep 24, 2011 10:46 am

Image
New theory of grand canyon formation:

Mystery of Grand Canyon's Formation Revealed
Charles Q. Choi,

The birth of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado Plateau through which it carved have been a geological mystery. Now a giant anomalous structure discovered on the underside of the plateau could shed light on how it was formed.

Over the past 70 million years, and possibly quite recently, the relatively flat Colorado Plateau of the southwestern United States -- a 130,000-square-mile (336,000 square kilometers) region that straddles Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico -- rose up about 1.2 miles (2 km), was invaded by magma and was eroded away into deep valleys, creating a dramatic landscape including the Grand Canyon.

This kind of behavior is more expected with mountain belts, not plateaus, and so these events have perplexed geologists for more than a century.

"Anyone who goes to the Grand Canyon and looks down should think, 'What is it that made it this way?' The most immediate answer is water, that a river cut this canyon, but what is it that made the rock it lies in, the earth, move up?" said researcher Alan Levander, a structural seismologist at Rice University.

Deep Earth 'drip'

To learn more about the rise of the Colorado Plateau, Levander and his colleagues analyzed new data from the Earthscope Transportable Array of seismic stations. They focused on the lithosphere, the strong, long-lived crust and upper mantle of the planet, extending to a depth of about 90 miles (150 km), which sits on top of the asthenosphere, the hotter, weaker part of the mantle.

In the lithosphere under the Grand Canyon and much of the western half of the Colorado Plateau, scientists discovered an anomalously cold, dense region more than 120 miles (200 km) deep sinking into the Earth. This anomaly is apparently pulling off the lower part of the crust above it, activity that might lead to a major part of the unusual geological history in and around the Grand Canyon.

The researchers think the cold region was created by the asthenosphere invading the lithosphere above it. As partially molten material expanded, cooled and solidified after flowing upward, it made the mantle portion of the lithosphere it invaded heavy enough to peel away and drip down. The more buoyant asthenosphere then filled the space left above, where it expanded and cause the Colorado Plateau to uplift.

The scientists conjecture this "mantle drip" formed in just the past 6 million years, and is just the most recent such anomaly occurring around the edges of the Colorado Plateau in the past 20 million to 30 million years. The timing of this event has implications for the effort to pinpoint the age of the Grand Canyon.

How old is it?

"There are generally two schools of thought on the age of the Grand Canyon — one is that it formed in the last 6 million or 7 million years, and the other is that it has a much longer history as a canyon. Our results suggest it's the younger date that's more accurate," Levander told OurAmazingPlanet.

Seismologist George Zandt of the University of Arizona, who did not take part in this study, agreed that "these findings would tend to support the idea of at least a young component of the uplift." However, they don't eliminate the possibility that there might have been an earlier phase of the uplift also, potentially keeping the idea of an older Grand Canyon alive, he added.

These drips are increasingly found all over the Earth, potentially including the western part of the Mediterranean, the central Andes and Tibet, and they could yield clues about how the upper mantle influences the surface of Earth's continents.

"They're a new component to our understanding of how continents evolve that we're just trying to figure out now," Zandt told OurAmazingPlanet.

Levander now proposes to go with more seismometer stations to image the U.S. anomaly "and see if we can pull out more details." He and his colleagues detailed their findings in the April 28 issue of the journal Nature.


Link to images of grand canyon: http://www.ouramazingplanet.com/grand-c ... otos-1281/
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Re: Big Drips

Unread postby tayga » Sat Sep 24, 2011 4:28 pm

Over the past 70 million years, and possibly quite recently, the relatively flat Colorado Plateau of the southwestern United States -- a 130,000-square-mile (336,000 square kilometers) region that straddles Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico -- rose up about 1.2 miles (2 km), was invaded by magma and was eroded away into deep valleys, creating a dramatic landscape including the Grand Canyon.


So these guys are starting out working from existing assumptions...

To learn more about the rise of the Colorado Plateau, Levander and his colleagues analyzed new data from the Earthscope Transportable Array of seismic stations. They focused on the lithosphere, the strong, long-lived crust and upper mantle of the planet, extending to a depth of about 90 miles (150 km), which sits on top of the asthenosphere, the hotter, weaker part of the mantle.

In the lithosphere under the Grand Canyon and much of the western half of the Colorado Plateau, scientists discovered an anomalously cold, dense region more than 120 miles (200 km) deep sinking into the Earth.


I wish I understood how temperature can be inferred from seismology. Or is it inferred from density which is inferred from seismology?

Does anyone know whether there are significant changes to the material underlying that which is ejected by electrical discharge machining? If significant heat were generated, I’d imagine there might be metamorphosis leading to the formation of denser rock from less dense rock...?
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Re: Big Drips

Unread postby nick c » Sat Sep 24, 2011 5:03 pm

The bottom line is that a uniformitarian approach is going to have difficulties explaining the formation of the GC.

Spiral Galaxies and Grand Canyons
Suddenly
Grand Canyon Part One
Grand Canyon Part Two
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Re: Big Drips

Unread postby Sparky » Sun Sep 25, 2011 9:51 am

Back in '63 i went to the GC. I had a new 35mm camera which i thought i'd take some neat pictures with. I looked through the view finder and then back at the vista. I took one picture! There is no way to capture the experience of the GC with a camera.!

People who actually believe that this thing was created over millions of years by erosion are looking through the view finder of a very cheap camera. But i understand, being that this is a dynamic, wet planet, and soggy tectonics is all that is taught.

I listened to an interview with these guys, and they are not evil. I think that if they understood EU, they might be a bit embarrassed by their theory, though they would probably still promote it.

There is a river in china that has some really strange formations that would have been eroded away if that is what created them...sorry i don't have details about that river... :oops:
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Re: Big Drips

Unread postby ElecGeekMom » Mon Sep 26, 2011 12:08 pm

After reading the pages in the links below, I decided to look up "fossilized asphyxiation". From there, I read this page:

http://www.astrobio.net/pressrelease/23 ... ino-deaths

I found it interesting, but of all the possible causes of death where the body contorts into what they call "opisthotonic posture", they never once mentioned electrocution. So I looked up "opisthotonic + electrocution". On this page:

http://www.uic.edu/labs/lightninginjury/treatment.html

I found this statement:

"Blunt injury from lighting may occur as the person is thrown by the opisthotonic contraction caused by current passing through the body and from the explosive/implosive fore c [sic] caused as the lightning pathway is instantaneously superheated and then rapidly cooled after the passage of the lightning is over. The heating is seldom long enough to cause severe burns . . ."

So, maybe the dinosaurs were asphyxiated as a result of being electrocuted?

Sorry for drifting OT, but I thought it was interesting, and lends support to the role of electricity in questionable catastrophic circumstances.

Does anyone know if there are any archeologists who incorporate electricity (as a cause) in their attempts at explaining what they find?


=============================================================================
nick c wrote:The bottom line is that a uniformitarian approach is going to have difficulties explaining the formation of the GC.

Spiral Galaxies and Grand Canyons
Suddenly
Grand Canyon Part One
Grand Canyon Part Two
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Re: Big Drips

Unread postby Sparky » Mon Oct 03, 2011 8:48 am

I recorded and am now watching "Grand Canyon Serenade", which was broadcast over PBS and can probably be found on their site...

It is a series of scenes with classical pieces as background music.
Too much time spent on showing boats running the rapids, but some really spectacular flyover and panorama shots also...

I noticed the remarkable difference in rock formations from just a few feet above the river on up to the top, which is almost flat!
Near the river there is fall material, which appears to be the only sharp edged material, similar to the walls. The rest of the rock material, that appears to be base rock in or very near the river is rounded, as if eroded. The only other rounded rock material above the river level has a darkened top. With so much fall material, it is difficult to examine what the river valley truly looks like.

Does anyone know of a bore hole to compare mineral content at same levels which appear on the walls of the GC?
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Re: Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Unread postby GaryN » Sun Oct 16, 2011 11:30 am

I was reading this morning about a Canadian mining outfit re-opening
a South Carolina mine. I didn't realise there had been mining in the
area, and believing that gold is transmuted through electrical and
resonant processes, I thought I'd take a look to see if there were
any signs of electrical activity.
South Carolina mine sparks mini-gold rush to the Southeast
http://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/South- ... 1.html?x=0
Google Maps image:
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Kershaw,+ ... 11&vpsrc=6
Looks pretty electrical, I think.
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Re: Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Unread postby starbiter » Sun Oct 16, 2011 11:59 am

Hello Gary: From what i see the area East of the Appalachians is slurry runoff all the way to the end of the continental shelf. The area would have been submerged. As the water recedes it erodes the land into the patterns seen on your Google map link. Every dam produces a similar pattern. I'm just East of the lake below.

http://g.co/maps/8x4zn

The same thing happened below. Fresh slurry is eroded into these shapes as the receding water turns into a raging flood. The slurry has patterns that start the process.

http://g.co/maps/9jk9j

Below the drainage is to the North. The water eventually goes South by way of the Green River.

http://g.co/maps/cf86q

Because Gold was found in the Carolinas the Cherokee people had their land stolen. They had become westernized, with schools, newspapers, and a euro lifestyle. They sued and won a Supreme Court decision. President Jackson asked what army would enforce the ruling. Native Americans aren't fond of twenty dollar bills in many cases.

michael
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Re: Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Unread postby GaryN » Sun Oct 16, 2011 11:08 pm

Hi Michael. Maybe I'm seeing everything through plasma tinted specs. after
coming to the EU fold, but especially in the second of your links, I would
see plasma excavation.
If plasma behaves in a manner best described by fluid dynamics, then maybe it is
difficult to determine the causal forces in all cases. I'm doing some research
into the geology of my immediate neighborhood at the moment, as when I was out
doing a little prospecting, it really seemed that the accepted explanations for
the formation of the whole region did not make sense. I'm suspecting plasma, of
course. I'll try and get some photos of some features before the rivers and creeks
start running too deep and cut off my access. The real gold in them thar hills may
be in coming up with some new insights into the local geology!
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Unread postby starbiter » Mon Oct 17, 2011 3:08 am

Hi again Gary: I see electrical activity in the link below.

http://g.co/maps/mykxd

The area seems to be covered with basalt. There is a 450 mile circle of basalt. The map below is the North edge of the circle. I think the basalt was heated externally.

But to my eyes the canyons were created first by drainage, then zapped.

It's the same in the area You think is electrically excavated. IMO the area was soft fresh slurry that was eroded by falling water levels, then zapped into rock by a plasma event.

http://g.co/maps/rzvyu

It looks like a dragon or thunderbolt, so it appears to be electrically excavated. Who would think falling water would make these patterns except a nut.

nutty michael
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Re: Possible electrical scars on Planet Earth...

Unread postby seasmith » Tue Oct 18, 2011 4:46 pm

And thanks to a joint American and Japanese science team, we now have a new perspective on the Grand Canyon and many other topographic features of the planet.


Image

Image

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/v ... c=eoa-iotd
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