mini craters - malta geology

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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Fri Aug 13, 2010 7:23 pm

Thanks Starbiter of reminding me of stardust again.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfCap5Vc ... re=related

Mr Thornhill explains another part of earth formation mechanism arround 3:00 min. Listen to the whole interview. A whole of subjects pass by.
Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -Nikola Tesla -1934
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Fri Aug 13, 2010 7:38 pm

Thanks Mr Amsterdam: So the Earth grows in layers, the result of dust growing as dunes. Who would have thought. I'll sleep well tonight. I listened to the audio, but missed this detail the first time.

Thanks again, michael
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Sat Aug 14, 2010 8:50 am

The files below show limestone/dolomite covering fossilized red sand dunes. The location is Red Rock Canyon, West of Las Vegas. I posted these earlier, but i don't think the links worked.

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UT ... 4&t=p&z=13



http://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0B-GyNP5 ... y=CLPTkfgP

http://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0B-GyNP5 ... y=CJbeoKcP
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby Sparky » Sat Aug 14, 2010 5:53 pm

starbiter wrote:The files below show limestone/dolomite covering fossilized red sand dunes. The location is Red Rock Canyon, West of Las Vegas. I posted these earlier, but i don't think the links worked.

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UT ... 4&t=p&z=13



http://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0B-GyNP5 ... y=CLPTkfgP

http://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0B-GyNP5 ... y=CJbeoKcP




okay...i see that,,,i think.....now tell me again what this means?

to me rocks is rocks...we gots bunches of them here in Mo... :D
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Sat Aug 14, 2010 6:05 pm

Hola Sparky: The point is, with the rocks West of Vegas, according to the mainstream view, it requires 600 million years of twisted logic to explain what is on view. But if you introduce comet dust under catastrophic conditions everything seems to be reconcilable without contortions.

twisted michael
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby ancientd » Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:38 am

starbiter Ive been down in Cornwall examining the Jurassic coast . Full of huge Amminite fossils buried in layers of dark clay so more mysteries than ever. However comet dust another mystery of Malta is the final deposition of terra rosa over what is otherwise an island barren of much till. This red dirt is seen a lot in Australia and more importantly many monuments and fossilized human remains have it embedded in the bones of people and mammoths. The normal archaeological explanation is red ochre ceremonial funeral rite. This red ochre is also ( I read at least ) found covering many ancient south american ruins. As i read this sounds a bit rambly but to me this red layer has occurred in many parts of the earth and may be the stain of the red blood falling from the sky ( plenty of mythology on this ) or a red dust that perhaps gave birth to the red sea or Homer's winre dark sea of the Iliad. PHEW ???
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Mon Aug 16, 2010 5:02 am

The details of comet dust provided by NASA make the top layers of Earth a new animal. Where i am in Utah the current was strong. Much of the material seems melted. Either basalt or rhyolite. Have you seen this in your travels Mungo?


This is the melting process involved with basalt, previously posted on the dune thread.

http://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0B-GyNP5 ... yvWQ&hl=en

http://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0B-GyNP5 ... qs4K&hl=en

http://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0B-GyNP5 ... 9_sN&hl=en


molten michael

moderator edit: corrected links
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Mon Aug 16, 2010 10:35 am

The links in the last post didn't open when first posted. They work now.

link challenged, michael
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby ancientd » Tue Aug 17, 2010 4:34 am

starbiterstein

seen very similar in Mutawintji national park near Wilcannia NSW Australia . Highly burnt top of the rock formation and similar red impregnation.Another curiosity for me is flint which they get a lot of in UK. I wonder at these flint shingles that are not only on the beaches but inland on top of hills. They seem as though they have a similarity to the Martian blueberries.Looking at these in situ and then pouring over the thousands of types of rocks at the British natural history museum gives you pause to think on how the literally thousands of different rocks were created around the world. |If we can label EU electromagnetic effects as the prime mover then there must be thousands of combinations and permutations of these forces at work. e.g Z pinches with different wavelengths ,field strenghts,voltages,pulses,duration of harmonics,chaotic episodes. You name it. This is no simple beast we are dealing with.Were they created by a Z pinch effect a la CJ Ransom ? The flint pebbles have a sort of shell on the outside with a flinty,crystal interior. They could not be the result of water moulding round shapes or the shell would of worn away. I wonder why they always subtend beaches. I am semi convinced EU events occurred along many beaches. Also large infiltrations of larger multi shaped flint os often embedded in the top layers of the chalk-limestone cliffs along the English coastline. No flint in Malta and only occasional outcrops in Malta which when they do occur are burnt. I think MattEU has a picture of these. Back to Malta these limestone formations that are circles and lines are always extremely hard, sort of case hardened.Their is obviously some agent at work concretizing them still further. Why are the limestone cliffs in England fairly soft and the Malta ones so hard. I'm still working it all out.I'll do a film on the Jurassic coast once I get my thoughts sorted out . all the best
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Tue Aug 17, 2010 9:02 am

"British natural history museum gives you pause to think on how the literally thousands of different rocks were created around the world. |If we can label EU electromagnetic effects as the prime mover then there must be thousands of combinations and permutations of these forces at work. e.g Z pinches with different wavelengths ,field strenghts,voltages,pulses,duration of harmonics,chaotic episodes. You name it. This is no simple beast we are dealing with.Were they created by a Z pinch effect a la CJ Ransom ?"

Thanks Mr Ancientd,

You're putting my visit at the British museum into another perspective. I guess that microcurrent, frequencies and different minerals and salts have surprising results. For example, I did not know that human bones under mechanical pressure would create a microcurrent. And then ofcourse artificial electric coral creation would be another mechanism.
Would you have other empirical examples of "electric crystal creations" or touching the same group of phenomena?
Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -Nikola Tesla -1934
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Wed Aug 18, 2010 1:46 pm

Concerning the variety of rocks, the process described in WiC went on for some time. Regardless of date or agent. The tallest mountains would be the oldest. The tallest mountains i see in the Western US are mostly granite. So the process started as granite, it appears. After the initial deposition the material available could have changed as the comet [Venus?] became less active.



The contents of the dust and sand would be sorted by the different ionic nature of each element and compound during the energetic plasma event. The current apparently fluctuated causing more and less heat and pressure. Some Garnets for example require pressures available 125 miles deep in the Earth. On the other hand, if the proposed enhanced aurora was strong enough the Bennett Pinch effect could supply the pressures required on the surface without a 250 round trip.





The craters on the surface of Malta could be areas where a glow mode of plasma discharge increased to arc mode causing removal of material and the raising of the rim. Do the craters occur where horizontally flowing plasma would be pinched by the landscape? When a canyon narrows the damage seems to increase, when it widens back out the burning and melting diminish, in my neck of the woods. Malta could be different than the canyons of the Western US.

michael
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby seasmith » Thu Aug 19, 2010 5:11 pm

ancientd wrote:
Also large infiltrations of larger multi shaped flint os often embedded in the top layers of the chalk-limestone cliffs along the English coastline. No flint in Malta and only occasional outcrops in Malta which when they do occur are burnt.


d,

You might peruse the links in the Aug 10 posts to this thread.
Flint is a variety of chert, and can form electro-chemically without being "burnt".
Limestone/dolomite can be catalyst to such a process.

Forget the fairy dust; it's been falling on Earth forever...

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malta and mystery fires and fireworks factory explosions

Unread postby MattEU » Wed Aug 25, 2010 2:59 am

MrAmsterdam wrote:Hello all,

While searching for piezoelectric properties of limestone I came across the following website;

http://www.humanresonance.org/messina.html

If any of these stories can be confirmed youll have a couple of other clues that seem to point to electric phenomena.

Update: Village Blazes Again

Jeremy Charles for The Mirror
March 18, 2004

A village hit by a series of mystery fires was in flames again yesterday, leaving experts more baffled than ever. The phenomenon began two months ago as fridges, washing machines and cookers all burst into flames for no reason.

Locals were evacuated amid calls for an exorcism but experts put the fires down to electrostatic interference from power pylons.

But just a month later, as villagers were moving back to Canneto di Caronia, near Messina, Sicily, fires have started again. Disconnected fuse boxes have burst into flames, car central locking systems blocked up and mobile phones have caught fire.

Yesterday mayor Pedro Spinnato said: "Yes, it's started all over again. Now we are back to where we started."

Last night experts, surveyors and engineers were probing the mystery.


Matt, maybe you can ask arround if any person saw simular stuff like this. Maybe they have mysterious fires too...



the mystery fires in Sicily have happend for a few years, if i remember correctly the mayor said the last time it was due to UFO's as its unexplainable ... they have Mount Etna volcano on Sicily, so very electric and Mount Etna is a Stratovolcano - "The magma forming this lava is often felsic, having high-to-intermediate levels of silica (as in rhyolite, dacite, or andesite), with lesser amounts of less-viscous mafic magma."

any strange fires on malta? i have asked about for things like this and also "crop circle" type things but only get blank looks back. but the rolling hill top area on pembroke where the lines are found has a fire every year. it could easily be manmade as its a busy area but its good that it happens as i get to see rocks that normally i cant!

malta loves its fireworks, we have fireworks going off all day, every day during the summer. in fact when i say all day i mean also during the day when they fire off the petards (immense loud explosion with only a flash of light). maltese people make their own fireworks and every year we have explosions and deaths. this year we have had 4 so far with the last one particularly notable. not only was it perhaps the loudest/biggest fireworks factory explosion for a number of years but they dont understand how it happened. http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/vi ... y-explodes
the dangerous bit of the process had been completed, they had been built and packaged. they were being moved to the lorry when the explosion occured. i read a comment about the humidity of the days before the fire and found this about it ...

Relative humidity

Relative humidity is the amount of water vapour that the air can hold. A low relative humidity means that the air is getting very dry, and fuels will start to lose moisture, they will become drier as well. And then when they become dry, that is when they are prone or susceptible to being ignited and fires starting. So generally, the drier the air becomes, the lower the relative humidity, that is when the fire risk or the fire danger will start to increase.
http://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/Contexts ... -fire-risk


is that the only reason or is it more to do with the EU?
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Qawra Point, St Paul's Bay Malta- mini craters or building r

Unread postby MattEU » Wed Aug 25, 2010 4:08 am

starbiter wrote:The craters on the surface of Malta could be areas where a glow mode of plasma discharge increased to arc mode causing removal of material and the raising of the rim. Do the craters occur where horizontally flowing plasma would be pinched by the landscape? When a canyon narrows the damage seems to increase, when it widens back out the burning and melting diminish, in my neck of the woods. Malta could be different than the canyons of the Western US.

michael



Image
"mini craters" found near the qawra point holiday complex


are they "mini craters" or "building rocks" or something else?


Image
Qawra Point, St Paul's Bay Malta and its rolling hill top shape


although i call them mini craters because thats what they look like, there has always been a question about what they really are. on a visit to the very gEUlogy location of Qawra Point, St Paul's Bay Malta i found all the usual suspects - ridge lines, discharge lines on the surface, quartz, rocklands, caves and a number of groups of these circular electroblemes.


Image
Salina Bay Malta and electroblemes


these circular electroblemes seem to like groups, especially groups of 3 and fine group example was found on Qawra Point Malta. what was very interesting though was the shape of 1 of the "mini craters" or "building rocks". the one on the left appears to be a triangle shape but infact seems to be part of an X or "bow tie" shape made up of a couple of thin ridge lines.

as i have mentioned before the triangle or V shape made up of lines is important on Malta as it appears to be the first stage of the thicker V or solid triangle shape (like the Star Trek insignia) that you also find in the limestone rock

so does this bow tie rock show how the triangle rocks are formed and does it show how the other "mini craters" are formed? are the others not "mini craters" but various stages of building rocks?

with the mini craters you do find a lot of them with a "V" tail or base to one side, does this show that they started like the triangle shape above?


and as to michael questions the way i find these circular electroblemes and it has to be said most electroblemes is by following the small lines in the landscape. these are not large, ranging from a few centimeters to the larger "ridge lines" of perhaps a couple of feet. but where you find what i guess are discharge lines you will find other electric universe geology. they also appear to be mostly on the tops of rolling hills or ridges and not in valleys or gulleys
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby seasmith » Sun Aug 29, 2010 3:38 pm

Hi Matt,

Now that you have apparently identified your hard “extruded’ material as chalcedony, and not the chert I'd once suggested; and Totally Embracing the concept of mege-plasmic event(s) centered on Malta,
Here are a few links and quotes pertaining to chalcedonic formations here in the US and etc, for your perusal:

“ Field description of the veins in the study area:
The veins are predominantly vertical. In some places they are run in the same direction, in other places multiple directions exist, or even a random direction.
The veins seem to be restricted to a geologic unit known as the Chadron Formation, and pinch out with stratigraphic ascent before they reach the overlying Brule Formation.
Chalcedony, a cryptocrystalline form of quartz, is the most common vein material. Because chalcedony is significantly harder than the surrounding sediment the veins stand out as small ridges.
The veins are zoned, with darker chalcedony at the margin, and lighter chalcedony towards the middle. The larger veins also show a core of calcite.
The veins are note evenly distributed. They occur in distinct areas or patches. In addition, the patches seem to be related to the faults. One patch occurs at the tip of a larger fault. Others seem to truncate against faults.
The larger veins often show evidence of slip along the vein, suggesting a continuum between the two structures. Interestingly, the slip often involves a vein shortening component (they look like small thrusts). However, considering the vertical orientation of the veins this is consistent with horizontal extension.
The veins often come in stepped (en echelon) geometries.
Tips of overlapping adjacent, but parallel veins can often be seen curving towards each other. These structures are called tip curls.

X
Looking down on subvertical chalcedony vein within the brown siltstones of the Chadron Fm.. The chalcedony vein shows zonation with a lighter interior and darker margins. Also note the thin zone of green alteration in the brown adjacent siltstones along the vein margins.

X
Looking down obliquely at stepped (en echelon) veins (traced with red dashed lines) showing a good tip curls. Such curl geometries can indicate relative timing (in this case the two veins formed at the same time.

X
Looking down obliquely at stepped (en echelon) veins showing a good tip curl as traced by red lines. Note here that only one of the veins shows the tip curl. In this particular case one might infer the vein with the tip curl came later.

X
The view is looking down. A more complex array of veins showing two dominant directions at roughly 60 degrees to each other (average orientation indicated by red lines). Note the distinctive bend of the larger vein adjacent to the smaller vein at the top.

X
The ridge that dips to the left is a fault surface. The small red lines show some en echelon veins that occur at its tip. Veining and faulting are related temporally and mechanically. However, this year we will be working mainly with veins in places without faulting.

Associated research questions: Even though the veins are relatively simple structures there are plenty of research questions to be explored.
In map view is the direction of the various veins random or non random, and if non-random, in what direction? This is the research question we will focus on.
What time did the veins form?
Why do the veins occur in distinct patches, and why do the patches occur where they do?
What is the significance of the various orientations of veins?
How far away did the fluids from which the chalcedony and calcite vein fill grew derive?
How hot were the fluids?
Where the fluids ascending, descending, moving sideways or did they have some more complex movement pattern?
Why are the veins constrained in terms of their vertical extent?
How deep below the ground did they form?
Are the veins antitaxial (with new material added at the walls) or syntaxial (with new material added at a median parting)? Related to this is the question as to whether the chalcedony or the calcite formed first?
What is the significance of the various colors of chalcedony?
Do they have a characteristic length-width ratio, and if so what is it and why?
How much local strain do they represent?
Did these veins grow, propagate, quickly or slowly?
What were the internal forces in the earth (the stresses) when these veins grew?
What is the significance of the curved tips some of the veins have?


http://maps.unomaha.edu/Maher/STEP07/supportinfo/chalcedonyveins.html

118 J. F. WHITE AND J. F. CORWIN

l Thus an upper limit for the formation and persistence of chalcedony is suggested at
about 300o. Concerning the lower limit, it has not been possible to grow
qvartz at temperatures below 100" C. This is also in line with natural
o1.trr.n..., opal being the mineral present at lower temperature' White
(1955) noted the rarity of opal in hot spring deposits at temperatures
greater than 100"; its place being taken by chalcedony and qtartz'
White, Brannock, and Murata (1956) observed that opal probably forms
at temperaturesa sh igh as 140oC . but is unstablea nd changest o chalcedony
or quartz.
Thus a temperature of formation on the order of 100-
300' C. is indicated for chalcedony.
Pressure may be more important than temperature in controlling the
occurrence of chalcedony.


http://www.minsocam.org/ammin/AM46/AM46_112.pdf

Crypto or Macro - Environmental Factors
What factors determine if chalcedony or quartz crystals will form?
Suppose we put a quartz crystal into a saturated watery solution of orthosilicic acid. Will the crystal grow as the water evaporates, like salt crystals do in salt brine? It primarily depends on the temperature: at room temperature, silicic acids have a strong tendency to polymerize, although the solubility of orthosilicic acid is very low. And in fact sometimes quartz crystals are found that have an opal or chalcedony cap. The speed of polymerization has surpassed the speed of growth of the crystal at that temperature.
The following table lists factors that promote or inhibit the formation of either macrocrystalline or cryptocrystalline quartz.
Promoting Factors Inhibiting Factors
Macrocrystalline
Temperatures above ca. 150°C

Low concentrations of silica in watery solutions

Presence of electrolytes (NaCl etc.) in watery solutions


Temperatures below ca. 100°C

High concentrations of silica in watery solutions

Cryptocrystalline
Temperatures below ca. 150°C

High concentrations of silica in watery solutions

Temperatures above ca. 200°C

Presence of electrolytes (NaCl etc.) in watery solutions

Absence of water

There is no clear line that separates the conditions of crypto- or macrocrystalline quartz formation, and there is not a single determining factor.
Other factors, like the pressure, may also play a role. One factor is clearly inhibiting the formation of cryptocrystalline quartz: the absence of liquid water - cryptocrystalline quartz is not a primary constituent of magmatic rocks like granite or basalt. The chalcedony that is commonly found in basalt ~[ or ‘red rock’ extrusions ] is a secondary product of alterations of the host rock under the influence of water.


XRD analysis was performed ... The different signatures suggest multiple mechanisms may be operating to generate the chalcedony veins.
Analysis of grain mounts has identified the existence of unaltered volcanic ash (in the form of glass shards) in some of the siltstone and claystone samples. Well preserved volcanic ash is puzzling, given that diagenesis
~[ diagenesis - The chemical, physical, and biological changes that a sediment undergoes after initial deposition and burial that convert the sediment to consolidated rock and/or result in the creation of some forms of porosity.]

...
http://www.spwla.org/library_info/glossary/reference/glossd/glossd.htm

could be expected to have altered the glass. Observed stratigraphic differences in glass preservation and instances of devitrification also point to a complex diagenetic history.


[img]http://www.soton.ac.uk/~imw/jpg/gpseud.jpg

" Your images may only be up to 600 pixels high. "

Cryptocrystalline Quartz
Cryptocrystalline quartz is simply quartz whose crystals are so small that they can only be seen with the aid of a high-power microscope. It is formed geologically from silica that has dissolved from silicate materials. Over geological time, this amorphous silica gel dehydrates to form microscopic crystals and eventually becomes what we know physically as rock. Cryptocrystalline quartz occurs in many varieties. These varieties have been named based on their color, opacity, banding and other observable physical features. Technically speaking, the two varieties that account for the vast majority of "flint" artifact materials are chalcedony and chert.
http://www.theaaca.com/Learning_Center/flintvs.htm


Sir Charles Lyle:
It would be natural to expect the fracture of solid rocks to take place chiefly where the bending of the strata has been sharpest, and such rending may produce ravines giving access to running water and exposing the surface to atmospheric waste. The entire absence, however, of such cracks at points where the strain must have been greatest, as at a, Fig. 63, is often very remarkable, and not always easy of explanation. We must imagine that many strata of limestone, chert, and other rocks which are now brittle, were pliant when bent into their present position. They may have owed their flexibility in part to the fluid matter which they contained in their minute pores, as before described p. 62 and in part to the permeation of sea-water while they were yet submerged.
[ 86 ]
At the western extremity of the Pyrenees, great curvatures of the strata are seen in the sea-cliffs, where the rocks consist of marl, grit, and chert. At certain points, as at a, Fig. 70, some of the bendings of the flinty chert are so sharp that specimens might be broken off well fitted to serve as ridge-tiles on the roof of a house.

Although this chert could not have been brittle as now, when first folded into this shape, it presents, nevertheless, here and there, at the points of greatest flexure, small cracks, which show that it was solid, and not wholly incapable of breaking at the period of its displacement. The numerous rents alluded to are not empty, but filled with chalcedony and quartz.


http://geology.com/publications/lyell/ch5.shtml
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