mini craters - malta geology

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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Tue Aug 03, 2010 4:24 pm

Sparky asked,
[...]
Thanks....was this sample from a very confined area, or is the whole mountain like this?



me again,
The whole mountain. The material is supposed to be 600 million years old. It came from many miles [100?] to the west. It was the bottom of an ancient sea. It was thrust over 3,000 foot, young, fossilized sand dunes. The matrix is primarily unfossiliferous. There are fossils, especially on the surface, that are not part of the matrix.

The mountain [Lone Mountain] is layered in the shape of a dune. The wind would have been blowing toward the NE. There is a mountain just to the NW that trends to the NW. There is a mountain just to the South that trends to the SW. Across the valley to the East is Frenchman Mountain that trends to the SE. These mountains within 30 miles of each other trend in 4 different directions. And they are all shaped and layered like a dune.

As the wind direction changed while the air was choked with dust, the dust would flow across the flooded basin. When the dust encountered dry land at the base of the large mountain it would form a dune. The wind was from 4 different direction causing four different trend directions.

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UT ... 9&t=p&z=10


Some of the dolomite/limestone is up to 4500 feet thick.

Sorry for the digression Matt. I'll post this on the dune thread also.
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malta geology - first and last limestone layers are the same

Unread postby MattEU » Tue Aug 03, 2010 5:25 pm

hello, sorry if i am not replying or keeping up with things but got a lot of stuff on at the moment with investigating all the stuff on malta. lots more to come.

no worries about stuff discussed, its all EU and its all linked and anything limestone is very related to malta :)

here is a thread about the layers of malta that has links to the Geology of the islands of Malta and Gozo (from an electric universe point of view)

the first and last limestone layers of malta are virtually the same including the micro fossils! you can find shells in certain areas of the limestone/sandstone but not everywhere

the lines found on pembrokes rolling hill appear to have large crystals in them (The end of the lines for Geology?). i have only seen inside 1 of them because they are rock hard and look as fresh as if they were newly made or being renewed.
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Tue Aug 03, 2010 6:07 pm

Hello Matt: The link i supplied claims the top layers are "quite unfossiliferous". Your link has fossils. Maybe it's a question of matrix, and layers of fossils.

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malta's limestone layers and fossils

Unread postby MattEU » Wed Aug 04, 2010 2:00 am

starbiter wrote:Sparky asked about burnt limestone earlier. The sample pictured below is from a small mountain West of Las Vegas. The mountain is composed of limestone and dolomite. The sample below fizzed when exposed to acid so it is limestone. Only the surface is brown/black and burnt looking. The entire interior seems grey.

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UT ... 1&t=p&z=15


"The entire interior seems grey." sorry to ask you to confirm but have you cut into the rock or is just the outside grey? asking because on malta we have special grey rocks that make up the interesting lines or even stones. its like they have been coated/plated with this grey or the surface has changed to the grey. but the layer is only a few mm thick.

also the brown rock do you know what type it is?


starbiter - i couldnt find the information in your links, can you quote it or explain what i need to do on the page?

are you asking if the limestone itself is made up of fossils and that the limestone itself is not formed by fossils but it has layers of fossils in it?

all i know from reading is the top and lower limestone levels of malta contain the same types of microfossils as well as being the same in other properties. i may have got this wrong so please investigate it and let me know as its important to me.

the limestone does not appear to be made up of fossils that you can see with your eyes but some places do contain layers of fossils. what is interesting about the layers of fossils is that you get the classic "sedimentary rock is deposits over millions of years yet large fossil shells are found over a few meters height". you sometimes get distinct double lines of large shells and between them a few shells and on their sides.

these links might help a bit more with the fossil stuff

http://www.shadowservices.com/nature/Ma ... iocene.htm
http://muticaria.blogspot.com/2009/01/i ... hy-of.html
http://www.heritagemalta.org/museums/na ... ecoll.html
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electric rock formation

Unread postby MattEU » Wed Aug 04, 2010 3:41 am

a bit behind the times but good stuff about the formations, layers and rock formation.

MrAmsterdam wrote:
Electrical Properties of Moist Limestone Samples in the Frequency range of 1Hz - 10.000.000Hz

http://www.insipub.com/ajbas/741-750.pdf



if the layers of malta were pulled out of the sea the top layers and sides would be covered or soaked in water, could this effect the outer most layers response to any plasma EDM that would be happening?


the formation of rock/minerals by electrically forces is very interesting. its working out what and how things happened. for example malta has its layers with the first and last limestone layers being the same.

were the rock layers changed when it was below the sea (some form of current passing through them), was it 1 or a number of events producing a different layer each time? then pulled up from the seabed. was it very quick or very slow? as mentioned before there are layers of large shells, were these actual deposits after or before each mini EU event

were they deposited upon each other by EU events and never pulled up from the seabed?


do the microfossils in layers show that an increased current went through them to increase the growth (similar to the electric coral reefs)?
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Wed Aug 04, 2010 7:40 am

Hello Matt: The grey color of the limestone rock goes all the way through. It seems to go through entire mountains. The brown exterior has not been analyzed. I have access to a spectrometer, but it is being repaired.

The link below on page 203 shows the top 15 foot layer of Malta is quite unfossiliferous. That would be the Upper Coralline Limestone, and the Globigerina Limestone. This layer sits on top of fossiliferous limestone. The picture i get is a reef that becomes higher than the surface of the Mediterranean. This dry reef would form a dune if a world wide dust storm occurred. The unfossiliferous Limestone is coved with Loam, [sand, clay and silt]. All materials available with comet dust.

http://books.google.com/books?id=9IgPAA ... us&f=false


I'm assuming when they say unfossiliferous limestone, they mean the matrix. I could be wrong. Having not been to Malta makes this very speculative. Things look much different on the ground. I hope you have access to local geologists who can help with details.

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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby ancientd » Wed Aug 04, 2010 8:48 am

starbiter etc. Just mto confirm that the top layer often contains fossilized shells seamingly indistinguishable from the limestone rock itself . I actually have taken samples and have an large oyster shell. Matt also has somepictures of these overlaying fossils. They not only frequent close to the rocky limestone beaches but line pointed knolls some 100 foot high. . Another curiosity is the numerous machine trenches ( locally called tramtracks) which an EU enthusiast would be tempted to call electrical machining but as if in opposition the MattEWU mentioned high raised lines criss crossing other parts of the island . Perhaps a polarity change invilving rapid crystal growth???? as suggested previously. However note they are often crossed by other straight lines running at ninety degrees ( or thereabouts ) to them. A little bit like mountain,ridge or dune building but on a smaller scale. . But again come back to the circular formations. These do resemble the shape of Wilpena Pound caused by a so called uplift of sedimentary rock. Well my little experts what the hell caused the circular uplift???? Bigger question does the sediment happen in one episode or is it the time deposition over millions of years as conventional geology claims
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Wed Aug 04, 2010 1:25 pm

Hello Mungo: The picture below shows Red Rock Canyon. The Red Rock is sandstone. The grey mountain in the background is unfossiliferous dolomite. The top layer of dolomite is full of fossils. The actual rock is without fossils.

I'd like to know more about the Malta Limestone. What percentage of Dolomite is there? If there is less than 51% Dolomite it's not called Dolomite. Is the matrix actually unfossiliferous as the article i provided implies? I need to hitch hike to Malta.


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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Wed Aug 04, 2010 1:27 pm

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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby ancientd » Wed Aug 04, 2010 11:38 pm

Starbiter and MattEU. Very curious these deposits? on top of different rocks. MattEU wasnt there 4 different types of limestone on Malta?. Not necessarilly cofined to a sequenced stratigraphy? Im in England right now and on the South coast near the channel you have the chalky white cliffs of Dover plopped next to other rocky cliffs of an entirely different rock. Then you have the chalky arms of the north and south DOWNS ( ridges) running inland . I must have a closer look. However apparently ( and I havent seen them) many of the fissures have mega fauna bones choked along the seams. Quite a puzzle. I must investigate.
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby webolife » Thu Aug 05, 2010 12:28 am

Hey Sparky,
While I was gone the thread went a completely different direction! I recall one little island [perhaps a couple acres in size?] we kayaked to with probably a dozen or two of these circularish features, in various degrees of wear from stormy wave action. Later while snorkeling I observed numerous roughly cylindrical [diameters from a meter or less to maybe 10 meters] reef structures, especially a half kilometer or so out from shore, where the breakers were. Also a green sea turtle... but no sharks... I vote for reef... weathering and erosion by wave action may have erased signs of reef fossils in some of the Maltese surface material, but I would have to go there to see if they looked the same as Oahu.
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the geology of the islands of Malta and filfla

Unread postby MattEU » Thu Aug 05, 2010 5:26 am

sorry starbiter and everyone i should have included a map of the geology of the island of malta before so you can see what the issue with the "top layer" is. the problem with the limestone and clay layers of malta is that they are all mixed up. you have exposures of the "oldest" or lowest layer beside or on top of the middle and upper.

i have never heard of any mention of dolomite on the island of malta or gozo and a search on the net didnt seem to show any results either.

Image
geological map of Malta and its limestone/clay/greensand deposits


the island of Filfla is a very strange small island just off the coast.


Image
Filfla Island and il-maqluba locations (linked by Maltese folklore and legends)


it is near what i would consisder to have been lots of gEUlogy activity like the blue grotto and especially Il-Maqluba with its own tale of catastrophe (tempest that struck malta in 1343) and was said to form the island of filfla (google images link) that looks like an island Butte.


Image Image
Filfla island (island Butte?) and the Il-Maqluba Malta legends

these photos of the island of Filfla were taken by my friend Alice and are great in that they show how close to the mainland of Malta Fifla is. the sea bed around Filfla is much deeper than its surrounding seabed. there are also reports of Filfla island having cart ruts on it back in the old days before the British bombed the shit out of the island for target practise :)


The principal fault (the Maghlaq fault) ... accounts for the fact that while Filfla is composed of Upper Coralline Limestone, the coast of Malta in the same region is made up of Lower Coralline and Globigerina Limestones.
Regional Tectonics - Filfla Island's geology different to the coast


the island of malta has an immense "fault line" going across it called the great fault, to the north of this are a series of ridges which i have wondered before if they are related to the Downs and now Frank below has given me reason to look into that further.

ancientd wrote:Im in England right now and on the South coast near the channel you have the chalky white cliffs of Dover plopped next to other rocky cliffs of an entirely different rock. Then you have the chalky arms of the north and south DOWNS ( ridges) running inland .



i spoke to a petroleum geologist who laughed when he found out i was going round the island looking at the geology because he says there is no geology here as its all limestone ...
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craters in europe - malta

Unread postby MattEU » Thu Aug 05, 2010 5:47 am

webolife wrote:Hey Sparky,
While I was gone the thread went a completely different direction! I recall one little island [perhaps a couple acres in size?] we kayaked to with probably a dozen or two of these circularish features, in various degrees of wear from stormy wave action. Later while snorkeling I observed numerous roughly cylindrical [diameters from a meter or less to maybe 10 meters] reef structures, especially a half kilometer or so out from shore, where the breakers were. Also a green sea turtle... but no sharks... I vote for reef... weathering and erosion by wave action may have erased signs of reef fossils in some of the Maltese surface material, but I would have to go there to see if they looked the same as Oahu.


you have to put these mini circles or whatever they are in context with what is found around them and the island.

Image
geology mystery and puzzle or electric discharge lines?

they are found everywhere there is evidence of EU activity. for example lots are found around the Bahrija crater that geology calls a doline. some are found in a line beside the larger crater and others are found on the other side of the rolling hill top (EDM arc blister?) where the Bahrija Crater is found.

the image above shows what appears to be electrical discharge lines where you find the mini craters or building rocks beside the main crater. they lead to the mini craters which are a few meters away.

i am slowly getting the information and photos together to show what is in each area but there is so much. when you see them for yourselves you can follow the EU lines/events that have created these. you have to remember that these show no signs of erosion, they look very "fresh" with no signs of damage. i just dont see how they could be formed on a reef and survived all this time when they look like they do.

webolife, i am very interested in those circles that you saw because there are other circles i have found near the sea in Norfolk England and there is always the idea that the same force will create similar structures using the local material. have you got any photos of those circles or found anything on the net that is similar?
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby starbiter » Thu Aug 05, 2010 7:53 am

Hi Matt, A search of dolomite and Malta produced nothing. The whole island might be composed of shells and skeletons. But the study from 1896 that shows unfossiliferous limestone in the upper layers is something of a problem for this model. This requires limestone to dissolve, then precipitate out of the water. Without calcite in comet dust, the precipitation model is the only option available. Because of the comet dust option, unfossiliferous limestone needs to be reexamined, IMO. Microscopic examination of the matrix may help determine it's origin.

unfossiliferous michael
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Re: mini craters - malta geology

Unread postby ancientd » Fri Aug 06, 2010 10:16 am

starbiter the fossils I collected were not within the top layers they were if you cementef and concretized on the first 2 centimeters. The top limestone was apart from this clean. Another anomaly is the prescence of huge dumps of extinct megafauna fossils in seams within limestone caves . These seams burrowed back underground. Again these were enclosed in capsuled seams . Obviously a fairly recent event had occurred on the island to create the fossils . Most mammalian megafauna extinctions are claimed to be around 10,000 years although those on Wrangel island Alaska ??? are only 3000 B.P. The Malta magafauna are of these smaller type. We could thus infer a young date for some of the extreme geological events on the island. To me wave erosion certainly doesnt explain the fossils 'stuck' onto pinnacles a kilometer inland
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