The Electric Earth

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby smartart » Tue Apr 22, 2008 1:50 pm

I was reading Velikovsky in the 50s, then Pensee, SIS and here I am following The Electric Universe. But I still don't understand: OK - there is conductive plasma in space. OK - electricity (unknown source?) is flowing therein. Are planets part of the circutry? Is a planet with an iron core a preferential path to (higher resistance) plasma? Is there resistance heating of planets? Does some of the earth's "hot behaviour" result?
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby Tina » Tue Apr 22, 2008 9:22 pm

Welcome to Thunderbolts 8-) I cannot answer your questions - but in a day or two I'm sure you will have many helpful replies. In the meantime you could check out some of the Electric Universe videos (if you haven't already) - they are found on index board under main heading Electric Universe - Resources listed as EU - You Tube Videos (or something like that).
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby bdw000 » Sat Apr 26, 2008 6:39 pm

Is there resistance heating of planets?


I don't remember reading anything about that before (maybe I forgot).

But that idea really sounds interesting.

I'm assuming that most of the solar wind does not pass through earth because of the magnetosphere (not a scientist).

What do some of you EU specialists say? Is plasma going to just flow AROUND most planets, or is some amount of electricity going to flow THROUGH planets, whcih might possibly then act as resistive heating elements?

Fascinating idea.
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby tesla » Mon Apr 28, 2008 11:08 pm

Another thought to add;
The flow of current thru space would have to be A.C. to be effective over vast distances. So, if in the current stream there was a planet, etc, a high frequency current would pass over the surface and a low frequency current would pass through the planet. If the wavelength of the current was exactly the diameter of the planet you would end up with a north and south, or a positive and negative end. There is nothing from stopping the plasma stream being both a combination of low and high frequency. You could think of Birkenland currents floiwng through stars as a string of pearls... Also the solar system could be a scaled down version of the solar system...

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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby Julian Braggins » Thu May 01, 2008 3:28 am

There is an interesting Essay here that goes into the relationship between the magnetic dipole of the earth and the temperature swings over the last 800,000 yrs, with graphs from established proxies, with the idea that it is not just the solar output , but the strength of field that affect the warming from protons.

http://freewebs.com/psravenscroft/

:idea:
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby junglelord » Thu May 01, 2008 4:24 am

tesla wrote:Another thought to add;
The flow of current thru space would have to be A.C. to be effective over vast distances. So, if in the current stream there was a planet, etc, a high frequency current would pass over the surface and a low frequency current would pass through the planet. If the wavelength of the current was exactly the diameter of the planet you would end up with a north and south, or a positive and negative end. There is nothing from stopping the plasma stream being both a combination of low and high frequency. You could think of Birkenland currents floiwng through stars as a string of pearls... Also the solar system could be a scaled down version of the solar system...

Tesla

I would say the flow of Electricity is actually Longitudinal in form as the primary carrier, not Transverse. Tesla would concur....

Infact I would say the Hompolar Motor is the way the Galaxy works and Pulsed DC is the way Pulsars work. I doubt AC is the way of the universe, but rather our way. Certainly AC Transverse Current would be fourth place in the hierarchey in my mind, behind Longitudinal Current, Homopolar Current and Pulsed DC.
If you only knew the magnificence of the 3, 6 and 9, then you would have a key to the universe.
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Casting Out the Nines from PHI into Indigs reveals the Cosmic Harmonic Code.
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby bboyer » Thu May 01, 2008 9:56 am

junglelord wrote:I would say the flow of Electricity is actually Longitudinal in form as the primary carrier, not Transverse. Tesla would concur....

Infact I would say the Hompolar Motor is the way the Galaxy works and Pulsed DC is the way Pulsars work. I doubt AC is the way of the universe, but rather our way. Certainly AC Transverse Current would be fourth place in the hierarchey in my mind, behind Longitudinal Current, Homopolar Current and Pulsed DC.


If it has a frequency/oscillation aspect then wouldn't that be AC, even if longitudinal or pulsed? While even the AC in our homes and businesses has an overall net energy flow from source to load, within the medium of transmission the "electricity" is considered to be oscillating at (in this example) 50hz/60hz in accordance with the frequency at the source generators. So if space currents have a measured frequency aspect then it would have an AC aspect, no? All the planets, sun, and even the heliospheric boundary have at least (RF I think?) frequencies that have been and are being recorded (I think there's a couple of posted references on the cymatics thread). I would assume Birkeland currents at whatever scale likewise have a frequency aspect? If planetary bodies, and even cometary etc, could be considered as circuit loads, then perhaps stars like our suns also perform a "step down" transformer function while also serving the function of a plasma discharge tube as well. Just wondering.
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby webolife » Thu May 01, 2008 2:43 pm

Help me if I'm misconceiving something here:
Does an atom [as per Bohr] function as an electric motor, with associated AC...:?:
Do electromotive forces operating across distance produce DC... :?:
Do electron dipoles, oscillating under the influence of light/EM radiation, have a temporary AC "output"... :?:

Heat and temperature are not synonyms... My view of temperature is that it is the manifestation of vector density approaching the system centroid, so heating might be seen to be greater when moving faster or in the direction of the centroid, as velocity increases, and/or less when moving away from the system centroid, or moving slower. Electric circuits have an instantaneous aspect, with greater heating associated with greater resistance [ie less paths to the centroid] or less heating with less resistance [more paths to the centroid]... :?:
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby junglelord » Thu May 01, 2008 5:28 pm

I am sure that Longitudinal Current is not AC nor DC. I may be wrong but that is what I understand.
Remember the four field theory of electricity by Dollard?
Two Transverse Waves AC/DC
Two Longitudinal Waves Impulse/Oscillating.
Does Oscillation (frequency) = AC
:?
I would say no in my definitions.
Frequency is a Dimension in APM so I may be looking at it from a different viewpoint in the first place and our use of the terms may not be the same. Actually there are two Dimensions of Frequency so I am working with a 5 Dimension Model with APM at present.

Of course I may and could be wrong.
If you only knew the magnificence of the 3, 6 and 9, then you would have a key to the universe.
— Nikola Tesla
Casting Out the Nines from PHI into Indigs reveals the Cosmic Harmonic Code.
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby bboyer » Thu May 01, 2008 6:53 pm

junglelord wrote:Does Oscillation (frequency) = AC


Actually, you're probably right. I'm reminded of Bill Beaty's material about the confusion of basic electrical terminology that is taught from the get-go. So while a "current" may have an alternating (oscillating) aspect to it the currency itself is, what, probably uni-directional even if it has anti-parallel (bi-directional) components i.e. a "negative" drift currency (electron flow) one way and a simultaneous "positive" drift currency ("hole" flow) the "other" way. And still, the ... or a ... NET ENERGY flow seems to be uni-directional (to whatever load condition is drawing power in the form of energy flow from a source condition). And then whatever the heck is occurring at the return circuit (the source's source e.g. a river driving the damn's generators, and then the source's source's source, the river's formation from snow melt or whatever, and then the .... eee-iii-eee-iii-ohhhh :shock: :? ).
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby smartart » Fri May 02, 2008 12:57 am

OK folks - I am now on anti-inflammatories for my brain. Can we come down off Mount Learned and get back to the simple question of I-squared?

In the light of all the above (if light there be) is it possible that earth's hot interior and/or other earth heating - some, perhaps, rather subtle - comes from Ohms Law, to the confusion of the two als: Gore, et et?

Keep it simple now - my logic is OK, but only if I can understand the words. Didn't some sage say: "If you wish to argue with me, first define your terms." :!:
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Isn´t the Earth made up of CONDUCTIVE MATERIAL?

Unread postby FS3 » Fri May 02, 2008 3:58 pm

Geological surveys of our Earth have concluded that certain gravity and magnetic anomalies do go along with the occurance of magnetic basalt.

E.g.:
A Crustal Magnetic Anomaly Database for North America

Now, secondary convection within the rock is related to increase of thermal conductivity that might be a direct cause of the electrical conductivity by basalts.

Same as in space? Low currents - but huge distances.

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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby bdw000 » Fri May 02, 2008 5:39 pm

Tesla:
The flow of current thru space would have to be A.C. to be effective over vast distances


AC is needed for long distance transmission because WE send electricity through a wire, which has resistance (to current flow).

I am NOT an expert, but It seems to me that travelling through space may not be quite as "resistive." In other words, DC might travel very long distances out in space.

Any trained experts have an opinion?
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby bdw000 » Fri May 02, 2008 5:44 pm

arc-us:
If it has a frequency/oscillation aspect then wouldn't that be AC


Ever hear of "ripple" ?

Any DC voltage can oscillate in exactly the same way that AC does, just without the change in current flow (any wavefrom can be either AC or DC, I would guess).

You can even have a sine wave on top of a DC voltage (so the DC voltage is fluctuating from +3 volts to +5 volts, for example).

Perhaps you guys are talking about something else?
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Re: The heating effect of an electric current

Unread postby bboyer » Fri May 02, 2008 6:34 pm

bdw000 wrote:
arc-us:
If it has a frequency/oscillation aspect then wouldn't that be AC


Ever hear of "ripple" ?

Any DC voltage can oscillate in exactly the same way that AC does, just without the change in current flow (any wavefrom can be either AC or DC, I would guess).

You can even have a sine wave on top of a DC voltage (so the DC voltage is fluctuating from +3 volts to +5 volts, for example).

Perhaps you guys are talking about something else?


Hadn't heard of ripple (except for the cheap, U.S. red variety during my teenage years, tho' I never tried it personally :lol: ). But what you say is interesting. Thanks.
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