Mars - miscellaneous anomalies

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Mars:very unusual image from NASA

Unread postby edcrater » Fri Nov 07, 2008 3:52 am

WhiteLight wrote:Hate to be pedantic Ed ( nah not really , i enjoy it ;) ) but isn't it INEDIBLE ? :geek: :lol:


Not according to my dictionary, "Dictionary.com"

"""1 dictionary results for: uneatable
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uneatable

adjective
not suitable for food [syn: inedible] [ant: comestible] """"""

I think I'm in the clear. If I wasn't, I would have claimed poetic licence! ;)
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Re: Mars:very unusual image from NASA

Unread postby Osmosis » Fri Nov 07, 2008 8:14 am

Mars: very unusual veering from thread :idea: :roll: ;)
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Re: Mars:very unusual image from NASA

Unread postby WhiteLight » Fri Nov 07, 2008 7:15 pm

Osmosis wrote:Mars: very unusual veering from thread :idea: :roll: ;)


I think its actually refered to as ... having a bit of fun ! :lol:

So you want back on topic do you ?

Whats your take on this photo Osmosis ?
http://marsrover.nasa.gov/gallery/all/2 ... 25L7M1.JPG ? ? :)
"Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality"
Nikola Tesla, Modern Mechanics and Inventions, July, 1934.
Fast forward 74Yrs->yawn! :)
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Re: Mars:very unusual image from NASA

Unread postby edcrater » Sat Nov 08, 2008 12:01 am

Agreeing and following on from my fellow thread-veerer WhiteLight, I would like ask if anyone has investigated the Hazcam record for a close up of this log/sleeper/Flake. The record is here : http://marsrovers.nasa.gov/gallery/all/opportunity.html

The rover appears to have gone over the object, and must therefore have had a close-up look with the Hazcam. Maybe this could settle the matter. I am working on it but don't yet know the date of the event

Any views? Experts?
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Re: Mars:very unusual image from NASA

Unread postby Osmosis » Sat Nov 08, 2008 8:36 am

Sleepers and skulls--It looks like the outskirts of a Nevada ghost town. A scale in the scenes would be handy. :)
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Re: Mars:very unusual image from NASA

Unread postby Xuxalina Rihhia » Sat Nov 22, 2008 9:06 am

I see other slabs of petrified wood in the background and to the right of the main slab.
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Periodic Layering in Becquerel Crater, Mars

Unread postby bdw000 » Mon Dec 08, 2008 12:49 pm

Reposting from the TPOD forum:

Just in case you guys have not seen this yet, it's got TPOD written all over it:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/MRO/m ... 1204a.html

There's a "flyby" video which, if it's the same as what they're putting on TV, is worth checking out.
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Re: Periodic Layering in Becquerel Crater, Mars

Unread postby GaryN » Tue Dec 09, 2008 1:25 pm

Some of the HIRISE images are awesome, love to have some poster size prints. The explanations given for the formation of these features is a total joke, IMO. If 'wind' has been responsible, then it is a highly charged wind. The layering of the rocks would seem to me to have been from the way the planet was formed in the compression zone of a plasma focus, where the rotating 'seed' would be receiving cyclical deposition of material condensed out of a dusty plasma stream. The deeper, well defined pits visible in the image at

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/2955 ... 04-bec.jpg

are probably due to the variation in electrical conductivity caused by irregularities in the thickness of underlying layers. The areas of lower resistance will become increasingly deeper when the next 'wind' blows, as they will concentrate current flows. The vertical fractures also concentrate the charge, producing what look like stream beds intersected by gullies.

I think my explanations make more sense that those of NASA. ;-)
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Mars:very unusual image from NASA

Unread postby Lloyd » Wed Apr 15, 2009 3:49 pm

* I posted a bunch more unusual images from Mars at:
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=1670.
* I originally posted them on this board under the thread "New Images from Mars". But for some reason the moderators moved them to the New Insights board and labeled them Hoagland Mars Images, although I don't know that Hoagland had anything to do with them. I think Joseph somebody came up with them. He interprets them as life forms etc, but they look to me like electric discharge formations.
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HIRISE images

Unread postby GaryN » Fri Jul 17, 2009 11:27 am

I'd noticed this before in an image, but this one is much more convincing. There are small 'craters' in what appear to be the very steep sides of the 'crater' wall,(top of image) that seem to have impacted perpendicular to the slope. Surely, an impactor coming straight down would have left a long gouge?
As for the rest of the image, if that isn't electrical/plasma action, I don't know what is. How long can the lie survive?

http://hirise-pds.lpl.arizona.edu/PDS/E ... browse.jpg

And just look at this fresh crater rim!

http://hirise-pds.lpl.arizona.edu/PDS/E ... browse.jpg
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: HIRISE images

Unread postby StevenJay » Fri Jul 17, 2009 5:53 pm

What grabbed my attention more than the perpendicular craters in the wall, was where the wall intersects the floor. I'm seeing something very odd there; as if the wall were gauzy and semi-transparent, with the "floor" faintly showing through from "behind" it. :shock: And on the left side of the image, the intersection looks blurred and smudged and completely devoid of the same degree of detail as the rest of the image.

Am I trippin' or what?
It's all about perception.
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Re: HIRISE images

Unread postby jjohnson » Fri Jul 17, 2009 9:27 pm

I've looked through about half of the 81 HIRISE anaglyphs (R-B stereo views) and did not see any that depicted those odd round craters in steep walls. A meteorite with an oblique incidence against a steep wall should at least show some ejecta around it, particularly a pattern below it where the impact could have shattered the lower impact rim and permitted slumping of the contents in a visible pattern "down the hill" from the impact.
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Re: HIRISE images

Unread postby GaryN » Fri Jul 17, 2009 9:48 pm

StevenJay asked:

Am I trippin' or what?


No, you are seeing correctly. I pointed out something similar a while ago, in Candor Chasm, I think. So is it the 'wind' blowing dust around, or is it, as I suspect, ongoing dissociation of the surface by plasma? Levitating dust clouds have been observed on the moon, and thats what this may be, but I think there may well be ongoing surface modification, so that the 'craters' grow sporadically. The crater rim glows observed on the moon are probably a good sign that further 'weathering' is occuring.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: HIRISE images

Unread postby Osmosis » Fri Jul 17, 2009 11:31 pm

GaryN wrote:I'd noticed this before in an image, but this one is much more convincing. There are small 'craters' in what appear to be the very steep sides of the 'crater' wall,(top of image) that seem to have impacted perpendicular to the slope. Surely, an impactor coming straight down would have left a long gouge?
As for the rest of the image, if that isn't electrical/plasma action, I don't know what is. How long can the lie survive?

http://hirise-pds.lpl.arizona.edu/PDS/E ... browse.jpg

And just look at this fresh crater rim!

http://hirise-pds.lpl.arizona.edu/PDS/E ... browse.jpg


Also, recall that Victoria Crater has the same "Dune Field" on its floor, as the "craters" in the above HIRISE views. :o :o
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Ramparts are signs of water??

Unread postby seanoz » Wed Nov 25, 2009 6:05 pm

Mmm, I am amazed, you know another user here MattEu has this comment under his posts:

(bautforum) DippyHippy I also think a fair portion of those who advocate these ideas are conspiracy theorists. It's just the way the theories are presented... like they're accusing the scientists of being incompetent, stuck in their ways, lying or just plain blind to the apparently obvious."


And that in itself explains the following:

http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/gallery/press/20091112a.html

I went to the MRO after seeing these http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/picture-galleries/6544429/Surface-of-the-Red-Planet-images-from-NASAs-Mars-Reconnaissance-Orbiter-satellite.html?image=1 great images of predominately PDM or plasma discharge machining effects on Mars, that are unwittingly passed off as 'curious' and 'pretty' and of course always assumed to always be from volcanic, weathered or impact sourced causes.

This ridge is an obvious PDM scar right? C'mon, almost all of the mountains I see on earth to me seem to have some source in PDM effects.

But more telling is the assumptions built on assumptions, take this line:
Because of this, rampart craters can be used to indicate the past presence of water or ice in the Martian crust.


Surely they cannot be serious, is this the definition of a tautology?
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