Mars - miscellaneous anomalies

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

Moderators: MGmirkin, bboyer

Re: I See Twisted Ropes

Unread postby MattEU » Mon Nov 02, 2015 8:39 pm

O Michael Goodspeed! (is how EU people should say OMG!)

i have seen some EU things in my time but that is either one of the most amazing, or, even more proof and evidence for water on Mars ...

Image

any more on where and what?
What is the origin or formation of our planets amazing amount of sand? Water erosion and weathering? Extraterrestrial? EU geology? Other?

Everythings Electric? EU theory related blog
User avatar
MattEU
 
Posts: 366
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 8:00 am

Re: I See Twisted Ropes

Unread postby Steve Smith » Fri Nov 06, 2015 9:50 am

Here are some anaglyph close-ups of the crater. Cyan/blue 3D glasses required. I tried to use the gray-scale images but the depressions kept becoming mounds in my mind. If anyone wants to check the large gray-scale, look here -- WARNING 206 megabyte image:

Sand Filled Crater in Medusae Fossae Region

Top left of the crater wall.

Close-up 1

Top center near the crater wall.

Close-up 2

Fulgurites embedded in the crater cliff edges; polygonal formations cut into the rock; fractal scaling; etc. Electrical scarring evidence.
Steve Smith
 
Posts: 160
Joined: Wed May 23, 2012 2:23 pm

Re: I See Twisted Ropes

Unread postby MickA » Wed Nov 25, 2015 1:59 pm

I noticed a twisted rope effect on New Horizon's images of Pluto ...zoom in on the areas running south from the "Icy Mountains" ...
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newho ... ?id=366735
MickA
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Nov 23, 2015 2:44 pm

Gravity on Mars

Unread postby Regulus » Thu Dec 24, 2015 1:08 am

Does anyone have any info, or links, relating to the measured versus predicted gravity on Mars.
Given that gravity in the current model relies on mass, i am wondering if there is a discrepancy between prediction and measurements by the various landers (if they had such a sensor on board). And if so, by what percentage they two were different.

Thx in advance - Trevor
Couer de Leon
User avatar
Regulus
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 9:25 am
Location: Devonport, Tasmania Aust

Re: Gravity on Mars

Unread postby D_Archer » Thu Dec 24, 2015 3:15 am

I do not think there would be much discrepancy, the charge effects become greater the smaller the body, i think mainstream is accurate about the gravity on Mars.


I searched and i think MRO did some measurements but about gravity anomalies > http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2014/pdf/2479.pdf

not much data...

Regards,
Daniel
- Shoot Forth Thunder -
User avatar
D_Archer
 
Posts: 1061
Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 4:01 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Gravity on Mars

Unread postby Regulus » Fri Dec 25, 2015 3:09 am

Thanks Daniel.
Thx for the link.
You're right, there isn't a lot of data on the subject.

Trevor
Couer de Leon
User avatar
Regulus
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 9:25 am
Location: Devonport, Tasmania Aust

Re: Gravity on Mars

Unread postby jtb » Thu Jan 28, 2016 6:37 am

Should be very easy to test gravity on Mars since it's a downward push. Transport a bathroom scale to Mars with a known weight on top and compare the difference. Much more complicated than that but that's the concept.
jtb
 
Posts: 517
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2012 12:36 am

Re: Gravity on Mars

Unread postby Aardwolf » Thu Jan 28, 2016 7:07 am

Phobos & Deimos orbits identify the strength of gravity on Mars.
Aardwolf
 
Posts: 1080
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 7:56 am

Re: Gravity on Mars

Unread postby Terminus » Thu Jan 28, 2016 7:45 am

Aardwolf wrote:Phobos & Deimos orbits identify the strength of gravity on Mars.


Perhaps, but I don't think gravity is the only force that determines orbital path. Electromagnetism must play, at minimum, a repulsive role, but also, it likely plays an attractive role as well.

Thus the need for measurement ;)
Terminus
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2016 10:28 am

Re: Gravity on Mars

Unread postby D_Archer » Fri Jan 29, 2016 2:27 am

The smaller the body the bigger role E/M plays.

Gravity influence diminishes with radius getting smaller

So yes Phobos and Deimos have their orbits also thanks to electrical interactions.

Regards,
Daniel
- Shoot Forth Thunder -
User avatar
D_Archer
 
Posts: 1061
Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 4:01 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Gravity on Mars

Unread postby comingfrom » Fri Jan 29, 2016 3:35 am

Aardwolf wrote:Phobos & Deimos orbits identify the strength of gravity on Mars.
Their densities calculate so low, that it is speculated that they are porous, or hollow.
My speculation is that there is something missing from their gravity calculations.

Looking for a reference, I found

From Space.com info page on Phobos
The moon is so small that a 150-pound person standing on its surface would weigh only two ounces.

Mass: 1.0659 x 10^16 kg
Density: 1.872 g/cm^3


Ah, here we go... from the ESA info page on Deimos.
Despite remote sensing investigation by Mars Express, Mars Reconnaissance Observer and Mars Global Surveyor, the composition of Deimos has not been resolved. The composition is a key indicator in the search for the origins of Deimos and Phobos. Data from the Mars Express OMEGA spectrometer suggest that Deimos has a primitive composition. Like Phobos, Deimos is thought to be quite porous.

Mass: 1.5 × 1015 kg

Density is 1.7 gm/cm^3
ESA page didn't have the density.

~Paul
comingfrom
 
Posts: 640
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2015 9:11 pm

Re: Gravity on Mars

Unread postby Aardwolf » Fri Jan 29, 2016 9:07 am

comingfrom wrote:
Aardwolf wrote:Phobos & Deimos orbits identify the strength of gravity on Mars.
Their densities calculate so low, that it is speculated that they are porous, or hollow.
My speculation is that there is something missing from their gravity calculations.

Looking for a reference, I found

From Space.com info page on Phobos
The moon is so small that a 150-pound person standing on its surface would weigh only two ounces.

Mass: 1.0659 x 10^16 kg
Density: 1.872 g/cm^3


Ah, here we go... from the ESA info page on Deimos.
Despite remote sensing investigation by Mars Express, Mars Reconnaissance Observer and Mars Global Surveyor, the composition of Deimos has not been resolved. The composition is a key indicator in the search for the origins of Deimos and Phobos. Data from the Mars Express OMEGA spectrometer suggest that Deimos has a primitive composition. Like Phobos, Deimos is thought to be quite porous.

Mass: 1.5 × 1015 kg

Density is 1.7 gm/cm^3
ESA page didn't have the density.

~Paul
I agree the density calculations and mass as the unique driver of gravity is questionable, but the OP query was merely asking if gravity had been measured and it has using its moons. The mass of the moons are irrelevant with respect to measuring Mars gravity.
Aardwolf
 
Posts: 1080
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 7:56 am

Re: Mars - miscellaneous anomalies

Unread postby GaryN » Mon Oct 03, 2016 10:43 am

Intersecting Channels near Olympica Fossae
Image
What caused this array of various channels and intersecting pits?

Their explanation:
http://www.uahirise.org/media/clips/ESP_045091_2045.mp4
I beg to differ.
http://www.uahirise.org/ESP_045091_2045
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
User avatar
GaryN
 
Posts: 2521
Joined: Tue Apr 01, 2008 8:18 pm
Location: Sooke, BC, Canada

Re: Mars - miscellaneous anomalies

Unread postby AltClut » Fri Jun 16, 2017 4:10 am

crater on Mars while viewed on google maps (link >here<), unsure of its name, but it is found near the southern pole. my googling skills havent been up to finding a mainstream explanation

Image Image

Image Image
AltClut
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2016 8:32 am
Location: Scotland

Previous

Return to Electric Universe - Planetary Science

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest