Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

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Anaconda
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by Anaconda » Fri Dec 18, 2009 6:00 pm

webolife:

Please...there isn't a meaningful distinction between "detritus" and "debris".
webolife wrote:
My catastrophic view has much organic debris being buried by enormous flows of sediment in a very short time.
Fine.

But that does not allow for a large amount of organic "debris" to get buried.

I'm sorry to hear that "build-up" is barely in your vocabulary.

But your lack of vocabulary doesn't change the fact that for your scenario to have a scientific basis would require a build-up of organic debris or detritus or whatever, so it would have a chance to get buried.

No, your idea doesn't make sense and the scientific evidence doesn't support it, no matter how much you want to believe it.

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webolife
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by webolife » Thu Dec 31, 2009 6:02 pm

'Zat so, Anaconda?! (Have you nothing "nice" to say?) ;)
You still seem to be speaking from the standpoint of a "present is the key to the past" paradigm!
If what you are calling "scientific evidence" is looking around at present life cycles and spans, rates of erosion and deposition, flooding, etc. and trying to apply these rates to "fossilized" scenarios of geologic history, then you continue to miss my point. A bit of "scientific evidence" for you-- There are 80-ft deep coal seams in the mountains of Antarctica, indicating the compression of likely twice that depth of principally vegetative "debris" by a tremendous overburden of sedimentary and volcanic material, I would say, in a short period of time. Now perhaps your objection might be that you suppose these organic materials took a long time to accumulate before their burial, but I would say that apart from your own uniformitarian assumptions you lack scientific evidence for this.
As for oil "reservoirs", density sorting or some other nonexotic process in the formation of oil could bring several flows of deluvially transported debris into a somewhat consolidated mass we think of as an oil reservoir... there is no need to imagine long periods of time for accumulation under such circumstances.
Detritus generally refers to the refuse and decay products of living systems, in accordance with their life cycles.
Debris, while more general a term, I use to signify the material carried to some location by natural/physical processes, after which that material is transformed into hydrocarbons by whatever processs you might choose; but you and I both agree that this is not likely a long term process. We're left with the same evidence, the interpretation of which is subject to the paradigms of us, the observers, not what I "want to believe"...
Truth extends beyond the border of self-limiting science. Free discourse among opposing viewpoints draws the open-minded away from the darkness of inevitable bias and nearer to the light of universal reality.

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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by Anaconda » Tue Jan 12, 2010 1:20 pm

Cramped on Land, Big Oil Bets at Sea
by Ben Casselman and Guy Chazan
Wednesday, January 6, 2010
provided by The Wall Street Journal

http://finance.yahoo.com/real-estate/ar ... ets-at-sea
Big Oil never wanted to be here, in 4,300 feet of water far out in the Gulf of Mexico, drilling through nearly five miles of rock.
So, Chevron and other major oil companies are moving ever farther from shore in search of oil. That quest is paying off as these companies discover unexpectedly large quantities of oil -- oil that only they have the technology and financial muscle to find and produce.

In May, the first wells from Chevron's latest Gulf of Mexico project came online. The wells are now pumping 125,000 barrels of oil a day, making the project one of the gulf's biggest producers. In September, BP PLC announced what could be the biggest discovery in the gulf in years: a field that could hold three billion barrels.

Beyond the Gulf of Mexico, companies have announced big finds off the coasts of Brazil and Ghana, leading some experts to suggest the existence of a massive oil reservoir stretching across the Atlantic from Africa to South America. Production from deepwater projects -- those in water at least 1,000 feet deep -- grew by 67%, or by about 2.3 million barrels a day, between 2005 and 2008, according to PFC Energy, a Washington consulting firm.
Yes, the large oil companies are going out to sea and exploring the deep seabed much as has been previously discussed on this post with supporting links to scientific papers and news reports.
Beyond the Gulf of Mexico, companies have announced big finds off the coasts of Brazil and Ghana [West Africa], leading some experts to suggest the existence of a massive oil reservoir stretching across the Atlantic from Africa to South America.
Actually, a series of oil reservoirs which emanate from the "cracks of the world" which cover the seabed and land like a girdle (these "cracks of the world" have been covered earlier in this post with supporting links).

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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by Anaconda » Thu Jan 21, 2010 12:41 pm

The evidence for Abiotic Oil keeps piling up and is overwhelming. The following article is from Bloomberg:

Texas Wildcatter Moncrief Hits Latest Gusher Beneath Old Fields

Read the entire Bloomberg article (link to article below):
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid= ... keU&pos=14
Jan. 20 (Bloomberg) -- William “Tex” Moncrief, the billionaire wildcatter and scion of one of the founding families of the Texas oil industry, is betting the key to finding new gushers is to go deeper than anyone has gone before.

Moncrief agreed in September to help finance McMoRan Exploration Co.’s $70 million Davy Jones well off the Louisiana coast in exchange for a 10 percent stake in the prospect. The gamble paid off last week, when New Orleans-based McMoRan said the well hit what may be one of the biggest Gulf of Mexico oil and gas discoveries in decades.
McMoRan said today that its Davy Jones well found additional hydrocarbon-bearing sands after drilling deeper following the discovery announced last week. The well was drilled to 28,603 feet, all but about 20 feet of that beneath the seafloor. It has found 200 net feet of productive sands and will go deeper, according to McMoRan.

Moncrief bought a piece of Davy Jones after being impressed by McMoRan’s success with a former Exxon Mobil Corp. well known as Blackbeard at a then-record depth of 32,997 feet (10,057 meters). He said he’s eager to invest in more projects with McMoRan Co-Chairman James “Jim Bob” Moffett, a friend of 50 years and a pioneer in finding oil miles beneath old fields.

The biggest find so far in Moncrief’s 64 years in the oil patch was the Madden field in Wyoming, which he tapped at almost 28,000 feet underground in 1969. Four decades after its discovery, Madden is pumping out enough natural gas to rank as the state’s fifth-biggest producer, according to the Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission.
From the Nikolai Kudryavtsev, Russian Abiotic Oil pioneer, Wikipedia entry:
The Lost Soldier Field in Wyoming has oil pools, he [Kudryavtsev] stated, at every horizon of the geological section, from the Cambrian sandstone overlying the basement to the upper Cretaceous deposits. A flow of oil was also obtained from the basement itself.
This is major confirmation of Abiotic Oil theory.

This fits Abiotic Oil theory in all respects and contradicts the "oil window" hypothesis in all respects.

Deep oil & gas below land and sea bottom.

The people who cling to "peak" oil based on the "fossil" hypothesis do so not based on scientific evidence, but on ideology.

It's a litmus test: After studying the overwhelming scientific evidence supporting the reality of Abiotic Oil, if a person still maintains the belief in the discredited "fossil" hypothesis, you know they have no respect for scientific evidence and are captured and controlled by their ideology and their dogma.

It's that simple and that clear.

Thank goodness folks like William "Tex" Moncrief are only interested in finding and producing oil, not discredited ideology and dogma.

Finding oil deeper under exhausted oil fields is exactly as described by Abiotic Oil pioneer Nikolai Kudryavtsev:
Kudryavtsev's Rule states that any region in which hydrocarbons are found at one level will also have hydrocarbons in large or small quantities at all levels down to and into the basement rock. Thus, where oil and gas deposits are found, there will often be coal seams above them. Gas is usually the deepest in the pattern, and can alternate with oil. All petroleum deposits have a capstone generally impermeable to carbon's upward migration, and this capstone leads to the accumulation of the hydrocarbon.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikolai_Kudryavtsev

It would seem William "Tex" Moncrief has taken Kudryavtsev's Rule to heart and put his money where his mouth is -- and struck black gold.

Abiotic Oil is the reality on planet Earth :D

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webolife
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by webolife » Thu Jan 21, 2010 4:29 pm

C'mon, Anaconda!
I subscribe to abiotic factors in oil production... there is nothing in the above post to contradict the presence of pre-oil organisms as well. My point is that long periods of heat and pressure are not required for their transformation. Only the appropriate abiotic factors, especially silica rich matrix and [genrally upwward] flow of methane, along with the initial conditions of heating and overburden of sediments. The salt caps also provide a "hothouse" for the oil production. What in any of the scientific evidence you are presenting disproves the presence of biotics?
Truth extends beyond the border of self-limiting science. Free discourse among opposing viewpoints draws the open-minded away from the darkness of inevitable bias and nearer to the light of universal reality.

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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by Anaconda » Thu Jan 21, 2010 10:57 pm

webolife:
It's not my prior comment standing alone, but the entire body of scientific evidence (while this post is pretty complete, there is more evidence which hasn't been incorporated, as of yet, in this post). I'm left wondering whether you have read the thread. (Oil is being recovered from depths deeper [and hotter than 118 degrees celsius] than where organisms have been found in sufficient quantities to produce the large quantities of oil located and produced and when the deepest oil is examined for the presence of biologic remains -- there isn't any.)

You can believe what you want, you are entitled to your own opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts. I'll leave you to your ideology.

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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by Anaconda » Fri Jan 29, 2010 7:12 pm

Oil off the coast of Brazil -- old news -- but how far off the Brazil coast?

Apparently, a lot farther than most people realize (including myself):
Jan. 27 (Bloomberg) -- ...Papa Terra [oil field] is bigger and costlier than the Chevron-operated Frade field about 230 miles off the Brazilian coast. Frade began production in June. It cost about $3 billion and holds recoverable reserves estimated at 200 million to 300 million barrels of oil...
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid= ... dETeCf39mQ

Oil fields 230 miles off the coast of Brazil. We're getting along way offshore for prehistoric lakes to form.
June 23 (Reuters) - Chevron Corp (CVX.N) announced on Tuesday a slightly earlier start of oil output at the Frade field, a $3 billion project off Brazil's coast expected to produce 90,000 barrels per day by 2011.

Crude oil from Frade, located some 230 miles (370 km) from Rio de Janeiro in 3,700 feet (1,128 meters) of water...
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN23120220090623

$3 billion for recoverable reserves estimated at 200 million to 300 million barrels of oil.

Nobody said it was going to be cheap. But history suggests recoverable reserves go up during the life of an oil field sometimes by a multiplier of 2 or 3 which could potentially put this field up to close to a 1 billion barrels (another factoid that suggests Abiotic Oil), now, if recoverable reserves go up that much, a $3 billion investment is looking pretty smart.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
webolife wrote:
...there is nothing in the above post to contradict the presence of pre-oil organisms as well. My point is that long periods of heat and pressure are not required for their transformation. Only the appropriate abiotic factors, especially silica rich matrix and [genrally upwward] flow of methane, along with the initial conditions of heating and overburden of sediments. The salt caps also provide a "hothouse" for the oil production. What in any of the scientific evidence you are presenting disproves the presence of biotics?
Perhaps, I was too preemptive in my response. For every person who writes a message there are bound to be more (perhaps many more) who share the same beliefs. And, with the "fossil" theory inculcated from earliest childhood with cartoons of dinosaurs and repetitive messages in school, popular culture, and the media, belief in the "fossil" theory is strong -- noboby likes to give up a long-held conviction -- and any opportunity to retain a belief will be grabbed at no matter how slender the thread.

So, it is encumbent on me to discuss the evidence at hand. Let's look at the evidence:

The oil deposits are located far out from shore, off the coast of Brazil, well over a hundred miles offshore (some as far as 230 miles offshore), and over 5,000 feet deep from sea level to the sea bottom for some oil deposits with temperatures around 500 degrees Fahrenheit, 260 degrees Celsius, and sometimes deeper than 25,000 feet below the sea bottom, under a layer of salt over a kilometer thick, this makes the idea of millions of years ago, pre-historic, ancient "lakes" difficult to conceive.

And as discussed earlier in this comment thread, the geologic record suggests that pre-historic sea levels a hundred million years or so ago were much higher than today (an inland sea covered parts of North America), making the idea of pre-historic lakes even more unlikely.

This set of facts and evidence makes the probability of ancient prehistoric lakes 230 miles out to sea in the Atlantic Ocean in water over 3,500 feet deep remote.

See Bloomberg, Brazil Oil Trapped by 500-Degree Heat, Salt Barrier (Update2) April 28, 2008.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid= ... in_america

But what of an idea closer to Tommy Gold's idea of micro-organisms converting abiotic methane to oil by their biological processes, whether as detritus or biological metabolism (and alluded to by webolife)?

It doesn't work.

Not only is deep oil (over 25,00 feet) found without trace of organic detritus, but the environment at such depths and temperatures make the presence of miro-organisms very unlikely if not impossible.

Why?

Because the highest temperatures that micro-organisms have been found to survive is 113 degrees celsius.

"Cultivable microorganisms could not be demonstrated, possibly because of a too high temperature for life of the sampled fluids, which was 118 °C. So far, the highest culturing temperature for hyperthermophiles has not exceeded 113 °C."

(The quote above is from, The secrets of deep intra-terrestrial microbes.)
http://www.gmm.gu.se/groups/pedersen/popDetail.php?ID=8

Remember, from above, the oil off the coast of Brazil has been found to be as high a temperature as 500 degrees Fahrenheit which converts to 260 degrees Celsius. Over twice as high a temperature as these "hyperthermophiles" have been found to survive in the deep Earth and under tremendous pressure to boot. And as previously mentioned in the thread there are other deep oil deposits with temperatures 400 degrees Fahrenheit or more.

A close examination of the facts falsifies this "microbe" converts methane hypothesis.

Where the oil is located has physical conditions inhospitable to even the deepest living microbes, so there are no microbes to be either detritus (new or ancient) or living microbes that convert methane to oil.

Earth is an Abiotic Oil planet.

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StefanR
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by StefanR » Sun Jan 31, 2010 12:28 am

Maybe it is time to revisit the tectonic bananas again?
The Samoa tsunami-quake
unleashed a week-long tectonic storm of deadly quakes
and there is again panic
around the Ring of Fire
where the media concealed
all those fake red bananas in 2004
But this time the panic runs deeper and the stakes are higher
and as the Ship-of-Fools makes its way to Copenhagen it is swallowed up
Image
by the deadly Black-Hole-Triangle inside the Big BlueVortex
which is a big hole in the Ring of Fire swindle
http://tectonicbanana.org/J-Samoa-Storm.htm
http://tectonicbanana.org/
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.

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StefanR
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by StefanR » Sun Jan 31, 2010 3:00 am

To shine a little light on the Tectonic Banana pages:
Canterbury Basin is part of a worldwide array of IODP drilling investigations designed to examine global sea level changes during Earth's "Icehouse" period, when sea level was largely controlled by changes in glaciation at the poles.
Before Canterbury, IODP sea level change studies included sites near the New Jersey coast, the Bahamas, Tahiti, and on the Marion Plateau off northeastern Australia.
Canterbury Basin was selected as a premier site for further sea level history investigations because it expanded the geographic coverage needed to study a global process. It displays similar sequence patterns to New Jersey studies.
Data from both the Canterbury Basin and the New Jersey shelf IODP expeditions will be integrated to provide a better understanding of global trends in sea level over time.
Global sea level has changed in the Earth's past; these changes are influenced by the melting of polar ice caps, which increases the volume of water in the ocean.
Locally, relative sea level can also change as a result of tectonic activity, which causes vertical movement in the Earth's crust.
Together, glaciation and tectonic forces create a complex system that can be difficult to simulate with climate models. This necessitates field studies like the Canterbury Basin expedition, say geologists, to directly analyze samples.
http://www.physorg.com/news183663703.html

Well if you really believe one needs to do record depth-drilling to study climate change I got some Carbon-Credits to sell you.
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.

Anaconda
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by Anaconda » Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:49 pm

Hi StefanR:

Thanks for starting the thread. The links you provided about tectonic bananas is enigmatic for sure ;)

Would you care to elaborate about the Enigmaic tectonic "triangles" or know where else they are further discussed?

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Offshore magazine is the premiere trade publication for offshore oil exploration & development. In the January 2010 edition they have a very good article on oil exploration & development in the Gulf of Mexico:

Lower Tertiary play: Is it Gulf of Mexico’s final frontier?

http://www.offshore-mag.com/index/artic ... _play.html

Some sceptics might say, "sure, you make it sound like Abiotic Oil, but that's your take, what do the insiders have to say about all this ultra-deep water, ultra-deep drilling?"

The article gives a good account of what insiders within the oil industry have to say:
Just as the voyagers of the science fiction Starship Enterprise probed the outer reaches of space to reveal new worlds, oil and gas exploration teams, working in the real world, have boldly gone where no one has gone before to discover giant fields in the deepest reaches of the Gulf of Mexico. They have taken a peek at billions of barrels of potential reserves. There are no Klingons to battle, but the operators and service companies will have to deploy next-generation technologies, some still in design and development, to overcome the greatest risks the industry has encountered to date. The technology challenges include extreme water and target depths, seismically dense salt canopy, low-porosity and low-permeability reservoirs, and high-pressure/high-temperature (HP/HT) downhole conditions.
The above passage is the lead paragraph of the story and it gives a preview of what the oil industry is up to in ultra-deep water, ultra-deep drilling.

First we know it is huge:
“The Lower Tertiary play could be as wide as 300 mi (483 km) and involve as many as 3,000 blocks,” according to the Minerals Management Service (MMS) Gulf of Mexico Regional Director Lars Herbst.
Potential reserve estimates for the Lower Tertiary play vary wildly from 3 to 15 Bboe because much of the play remains untested. A better gauge of value can be discerned from the capacity of some of the production facilities currently under construction or in engineering design...
I have previously discussed the high temperature & pressure of the oil deposits:
Bottomhole pressure in the Lower Tertiary wells is expected to exceed 20,000 psi (138 MPa) and the temperature to exceed 400° F (204° C). Current technology can accommodate either high pressure or high temperature. With both high pressure and high temperature, the completion equipment has to be redesigned, possibly with new higher strength, low-corrosion metals and elastomers as higher temperature also increases corrosion effects. A similar redesign process is under way for extreme-condition packers and cementing equipment.
“Our customers in the Lower Tertiary play routinely encounter depths below 20,000 ft (6,096 m) and pressures above 20,000 psi, making it is necessary to use high-density fluids for reducing surface treating pressures,” explains Richard Vaclavik, GoM Region vice president, Halliburton.
The deep waters of the Gulf of mexico were not always looked at favorably by the oil companies:
Subsequently in the early 2000s, few geologists expected to find significant oil traps in the Lower Tertiary. The skeptics have been proven wrong with the discovery of long Lower Tertiary oil pay zones. These discoveries will require development efforts of several decades. Will the operators then discover another frontier beyond the Lower Tertiary in the abyssal depths of greater than 12,000 ft (3,658 m) in the Sigsbee Deep?
The fact that the author of the story would even ask about "abyssal depths of greater than 12,000 ft (3,658 m) in the Sigsbee deep" suggests oil companies are seriously considering that possibility. Also, there is more evidence to suggest the oil companies are serious beyond the say so of this story's author.

It's not what the oil companies say, it's what they do: Actions speak louder than words:
With five-year drilling contracts from Chevron in hand, Transocean has placed into service two ultra deepwater drillships built to the operator’s specifications. The Discoverer Clear Leader began drilling operations in August 2009. The second vessel, Discoverer Inspiration, is scheduled for delivery in early 2010. Both drillships are capable of drilling in 12,000 ft (3,658 m) of water to a total depth of 40,000 ft (12,192 m), exceeding the limitations of existing rigs.
In December 2008, Baker Hughes inaugurated its Center for Technology Innovation (CTI) in Houston. The primary focus of this facility is to develop next-generation completion and production tools for HP/HT conditions typically found in the Lower Tertiary wells. “The CTI is capable of testing full-size prototypes of the next generation of completion and production equipment in a test environment with gas pressure up to 40,000 psi and temperature up to 700° F (371° C),” says Rustom Mody, Baker Hughes vice president of Technology.
Research & development for oil deposits as high in temperature as 700 degrees Fahrenheit, and twice the pressures currently encountered, it strongly suggests the oil majors think there is oil much deeper than is even presently being located at, likely deeper than 30,000 feet below the bottom of the seabed (Mount Everest is 29,000 ft above sea level).

No, micro-organisms in those conditions and no ancient shallow lake beds either.

Here is some evidence to suggest the oil companies are right to think oil can be found in those kind of extreme (700 degrees F) physical parameters:
Andesitic pillow lavas containing biogenic, solid bitumen (SB) are a constituent of a Neoproterozoic volcanosedimentary sequence (Teplá-Barrandian unit, Bohemian Massif) in the Mítov area of the Czech Republic. A black shale formation that is crosscut by these andesitic basalts is 565 Ma old. Carbon disulfide extracts of two powdered samples of SB contain 0.2 and 0.3 ppm of C60 [a type of "buckyballs"], respectively, as determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_o ... 70629680d6

Calling it "biogenic" is an artifact from the then prevailing paradigm which couldn't conceive of Abiotic Oil.

The relevant issue for this discussion is that Andesitic pillow lavas typically are molten at around 2000 degrees Fahrenheit, yet when the lava cooled into these round shapes it retained "solid bitumen", a solid, heavy hydrocarbon, within the lava.

Most definitely not a process associated with shallow lake beds ancient or not, or with living micro-organisms. So, the oil companies are right to be developing technology that can handle higher temperatures and deeper oil formations (higher pressure).

(At the end of the article is a PDF of Gulf of Mexico discoveries and their water depth.)

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StefanR
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by StefanR » Thu Feb 04, 2010 11:04 am

Anaconda wrote:Thanks for starting the thread. The links you provided about tectonic bananas is enigmatic for sure ;)

Would you care to elaborate about the Enigmaic tectonic "triangles" or know where else they are further discussed?
No thanks for starting the thread, perhaps proper thanks is due to all the contributors.
To eloborate about this information and site I still find quite hard. The difficulty lies in the fact that the information is not given as lineary as most sites will. That makes it a bit hard to get down to the site-author's core idea, so to say ;) .
On an earlier thread I had posted a bit already:
And the link at the bottom gives an entry to some more info about the bananas, cucumbers and pumpkins. Sadly at the moment the site seems not reachable because of bandwidth troubles. :?
When the site gets back up it might be fun to explore it a little?
The illusion from which we are seeking to extricate ourselves is not that constituted by the realm of space and time, but that which comes from failing to know that realm from the standpoint of a higher vision. -L.H.

Anaconda
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by Anaconda » Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:11 pm

This is part two of the proceeding comment which presented an article on the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico: Lower Tertiary play: Is it Gulf of Mexico’s final frontier?

Offshore magazine presents a companion article: Imaging challenges in deepwater US/Mexico border zone, published January 1, 2010:

http://www.offshore-mag.com/index/artic ... enges.html

So, we've seen what oil industry insiders have to say about the prospects and technical challenges of ultra-deep drilling in ultra-deepwater. Now, it's time to look at what the oil industry is mapping in order to locate this ultra- deep oil, in other words, the tectonic structures in the seabed of the Gulf of Mexico where the oil industry thinks there will be petroleum.
Exploration in the deepwater US GoM has been the main offshore focus for the US petroleum industry since the 2001 discovery of thick Paleogene submarine turbidite sand in the Baha No. 2 well (Meyer et al. 2005). The presence of the Wilcox formation sands changed the perception of the industry to deepwater exploration and identified the presence of a new deepwater play – the “Lower Tertiary Wilcox Play.”
And from the previous Offshore article:
Subsequently in the early 2000s, few geologists expected to find significant oil traps in the Lower Tertiary. The skeptics have been proven wrong with the discovery of long Lower Tertiary oil pay zones.
Of course, the reason for "changed perception" was because the "fossil" theory's "oil window" corollary of hydrocarbon's generation, which claimed there exists from roughly 7,500 feet to 15,000 feet, an "oil window" within which temperatures are appropriate for oil formation has been completely falsified by the ultra-deep oil deposits.
The challenge on both sides of the US/Mexico border is to image and to locate the Wilcox (and other) prospects adjacent to and below the salt canopy.
The Offshore article goes on:
Understanding the play-fairway opportunities in this setting requires a regional, structural, and stratigraphic context for the Wilcox including subsalt sediment distribution and a better understanding of the tectonic framework of the basement.
And, here is the money quote of the article:
Mapping the structure of the rifted basement, its impact on sedimentation, the distribution of autochthonous salt, and the location of the continental-oceanic boundary (COB) all were crucial within the workflow, which culminated in a new deep allochthonous salt isopach used to confirm existing drilled structures and to identify new prospects within the subsalt environment.
The study had a number of additional key objectives to help reach the goal of subsalt prospect identification, including:

1. Delineation of an integrated basement surface across the area
...basement density and susceptibility, location of open salt feeders, and the position of the COB.
Reference to "basement density and susceptibility", while a little vague essentially means the crustal thickness and potential for fissures and cracks where petroleum would rise up from into covering sedimentary trapping structures (or potentially oil could be located in reservoirs within the basement below fracture lines).

The Continent-ocean boundary (COB) or continent-ocean transition is the boundary between continental crust and oceanic crust. The identification of continent-ocean boundaries is important in the definition of plate boundaries and the identification and mapping of fractures, tears, and rifts in the basement in association with this boundary area.


The prior Offshore article on the Lower Tertiary play, asked this question:
Will the operators then discover another frontier beyond the Lower Tertiary in the abyssal depths of greater than 12,000 ft (3,658 m) in the Sigsbee Deep?
The answer appears to be, "Yes", because oil already has been found in the abyssal depths of the Gulf of Mexico:
Asphalt volcanoes and lava-like flows of solidified asphalt on the seafloor were first discovered and described by MacDonald et al.. The flows covered more than one square kilometer of a dissected salt dome at abyssal depths (˜3000 m) in the southern Gulf of Mexico. “Chapopote” (93°26'W, 21°54'N) was one of two asphalt volcanoes they discovered.
http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2005/2 ... 0002.shtml

This area has been covered prior in this thread, but is germane to this discussion.
MacDonald et al. determined that the apparently fresh asphalt must initially have flowed in a hot state, and subsequently chilled, contracted, and solidified, much in the same way as normal lava does on the surface of the Earth.
So, it is already known that oil deposits are located in the abyssal depths of the Gulf of Mexico.

Notice what techniques are used to map the structures and find the oil:
•Construction of the final integrated basement using elements of seismic acoustic basement and magnetic basement
•2D gravity and magnetic modeling constrained with input from mapped seismic horizons, crustal thickness information, density/velocity data, and allochthonous salt distribution
Magnetic imaging has been in use by the oil industry along time and it has been previously pointed out in this discussion thread that oil deposits have a magnetic signature.
Results


Enhanced delineation of basement structure has lead to a better understanding of the original salt depositional environment and rift morphology, which in turn has had a significant control on subsequent salt mobilization.

The work confirmed that basement structure is dominated by NW-SE and NE-SW trending lineaments/faults. Deep allochthonous salt mobilization is controlled by many of these features.

The location of the COB has been delineated across the region using evidence from all three datasets. Due to the extremely attenuated nature of the continental crust in the region (6-12 km, 3¾ - 7½ mi thickness across the study area), differentiation between what is oceanic and what is attenuated crust was a major challenge and can only be resolved by combining all three datasets.
To highlight:
The work confirmed that basement structure is dominated by NW-SE and NE-SW trending lineaments/faults.
What are "trending lineaments"?

Could they be larger patterns of faulting "blocks", grabens, that trap oil in their cantilever angulation?

And how much oil could these protean shapes hold in cantilevered succession across the sea floor?

The article uses the word "attenuated" to describe the continental crust. Attenuated means "thin" crust. So, the continental crust in this area is "extremely" thin. Might this be why oil has risen up through cracks and fissures in Texas to such a noticable degree?

The reason for mapping in detail the basement (also called bedrock) structure and the cracks, fissures, and rifts is clear enough, that's where the oil emanates from.

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webolife
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by webolife » Tue Feb 09, 2010 7:00 pm

Anaconda,
First, please stop presuming [if you still are] that I present or represent a traditional view of biotic oil production. I do not.
Secondly, I do like Thomas Gold's stuff. I just reread one of his early articles... excellent. I believe oil formed and is still forming in relatively quick geologic time frame, not over millions of years, and am sure that abiotic factors are the major reason for this. And the "inland seas" you refer to over the N Amer protocontinent are good enough for me, I need no other "lakes".
Finally, the off-shore Brazilian deposits you are describing need not have formed because of organisms living there [impossibly] in situ. The material would likely have been transported and/or buried rapidly as the continents split apart and the spreading seafloor became the repository for a deluge of sediments from off the continents, as well as shifted from the influx of the ocean waters, some of which may have been teeming with [former] organisms. The current depths at which these are found could be a natural result of isostasy. The relatively extreme heat would have been one of the abiotic factors in their rapid transformation to oil.
Truth extends beyond the border of self-limiting science. Free discourse among opposing viewpoints draws the open-minded away from the darkness of inevitable bias and nearer to the light of universal reality.

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Ion01
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by Ion01 » Wed Feb 10, 2010 2:15 pm

I am a little late to the debate here but I keep noticing the continued reference to organic materials and thier supposed need in the "production" of oil. I recall, but, but cannot find, an experiment in which, I beleive, they used one of these machines that makes diamonds and put rock, water, and air or nitogen and compressed it and they got oil and gases and the types varied on the ratio of each component present. Does anyone else recall this or can find this?
The point is that if rock, water, air, and compression is all that is needed then electricity could provide the compressive force to make oil. Thus, the reason oil can be found in all levels of the crust and could could still be made deep in the earth right now.
I will keep looking for the experiment but if someone else remembers it that would be great. Thanks!

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Ion01
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread post by Ion01 » Wed Feb 10, 2010 2:33 pm

Here is an interesting article about diamond being created with plasma. http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.09/diamond.html
I know its not oil but the same concepts apply regarding the application of heat and pressure.

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