Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread postby moonkoon » Tue Nov 08, 2016 3:13 am

Re the chapter on "Carbon in the Core, Bin Chen and Jie Li"

... iron carbide, Fe7C3, provides a good match for the density and sound velocities of Earth's inner core under the relevant conditions.

... seismic waves called S waves travel through the inner core at about half the speed expected for most iron-rich alloys under relevant pressures.

Some researchers have attributed the S-wave velocities to the presence of liquid, calling into question the solidity of the inner core. In recent years, the presence of various light elements—including sulfur, carbon, silicon, oxygen and hydrogen—has been proposed to account for the density deficit of Earth's core.

... "This model challenges the conventional view that the Earth is highly depleted in carbon ...

http://ns.umich.edu/new/releases/22547- ... l-suggests

Note that this iron carbide model is just that, ...a model. The modelers acknowledge that it is provocative and speculative.
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Re: Hydrocarbons in the Deep Earth?

Unread postby Chromium6 » Wed Nov 23, 2016 10:31 pm

moonkoon wrote:Re the chapter on "Carbon in the Core, Bin Chen and Jie Li"

... iron carbide, Fe7C3, provides a good match for the density and sound velocities of Earth's inner core under the relevant conditions.

... seismic waves called S waves travel through the inner core at about half the speed expected for most iron-rich alloys under relevant pressures.

Some researchers have attributed the S-wave velocities to the presence of liquid, calling into question the solidity of the inner core. In recent years, the presence of various light elements—including sulfur, carbon, silicon, oxygen and hydrogen—has been proposed to account for the density deficit of Earth's core.

... "This model challenges the conventional view that the Earth is highly depleted in carbon ...

http://ns.umich.edu/new/releases/22547- ... l-suggests

Note that this iron carbide model is just that, ...a model. The modelers acknowledge that it is provocative and speculative.


That paper's mention of Diamond Anvil pressure to replicate deep Earth pressure reminded me of this paper. Some Chinese researchers found strange elements under a Diamond Anvil that are not ordinary.

Salt is not what we thought
http://milesmathis.com/salt.pdf
On the Windhexe: ''An engineer could not have invented this,'' Winsness says. ''As an engineer, you don't try anything that's theoretically impossible.''
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